April 2018

April 2018

Sponsored Content


Don’t Lose Sight of Competence and Connection in a Digital World

By Leah Clark, Director, Strategy & Development
BlessingWhite, A Division of GP Strategies

I

t’s no surprise to anyone that digital transformation is likely to continue with increasingly profound impact on how organizations conduct business. This disruption is massive, requiring new rules for operating in a digital world as well as changing how employees and customers want to interact with organizations. As a result, businesses need to shift to a new way of working.

A recent Harvard Business Review study indicated that “70% of CEOs believe they do not have the right skills, leader, or operating structure to adapt.” As organizations evolve and try to figure out how to shift to a digital business leadership model—from recruiting and sales to customer service and internal communications—what are the implications for the leaders of these organizations? How does leadership change in a digital age? And what skills will become most critical to lead successfully?

Editor’s Letter


Dad Rules

A

ccording to some estimates, companies spend as much as $50 billion a year on leadership development in the hope of finding and developing their future leaders.

While that commitment is certainly crucial, in many cases the most important investment in leadership starts way earlier with our first role models: mom and dad.

Take my dad, for example. The son of a bus driver and retail worker from a working class neighborhood on the South Side of Chicago, he was the first in the family to attend college, much less graduate from it.

Dad parlayed his first job as manager in the appliance department at a Sears store into a decades-long career that ended with him as a regional manager for Sears service centers across a large swath of Chicagoland.

Day in and day out, he was out the door before sunrise often getting home only after the sun had gone to bed. I’m sure he had days he didn’t feel his best but I never heard him complain about it. There was no mystery to it: Hard work was simply what you did.

APRIL 2018 | Volume 17, Issue 3

CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER
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PRESIDENT
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Ave Rio
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CONTRIBUTING WRITERS
Philios Andreou
Josh Bersin
David DeFilippo
Michael E. Echols
Soren Eilertsen
Sarah Fister Gale
Jack J. Phillips
Patti P. Phillips
Joe Raelin
Marygrace Schumann
Todd M. Warner

CHIEF LEARNING OFFICER EDITORIAL ADVISORY BOARD

Cedric Coco, EVP, Chief People Officer, Brookdale Senior Living Inc.
Lisa Doyle, Head of Retail Training, Ace Hardware
David DeFilippo, Chief People and Learning Officer, Suffolk
Tamar Elkeles, Chief Talent Executive, Atlantic Bridge Capital
Thomas Evans, (Ret.) Chief Learning Officer, PricewaterhouseCoopers
Gerry Hudson-Martin, Director, Corporate Learning Strategies, Business Architects
Kimo Kippen, President, Aloha Learning Advisors
Rob Lauber, Vice President, Chief Learning Officer, McDonald’s Corp.
Maj. Gen. Erwin F. Lessel, (Ret.) U.S. Air Force, Director, Deloitte Consulting
Justin Lombardo, (Ret.) Chief Learning Officer, Baptist Health
Adri Maisonet-Morales, Vice President, Enterprise Learning and Development, Blue Cross Blue Shield of North Carolina
Alan Malinchak, CEO, Éclat Transitions LLC and STRATactical LLC
Lee Maxey, CEO, MindMax
Bob Mosher, Senior Partner and Chief Learning Evangelist, APPLY Synergies
Rebecca Ray, Executive Vice President, The Conference Board
Allison Rossett, (Ret.) Professor of Educational Technology, San Diego State University
Diana Thomas, CEO and Founder, Winning Results
David Vance, Executive Director, Center for Talent Reporting
Kevin D. Wilde, Executive Leadership Fellow, Carlson School of Management, University of Minnesota
James P. Woolsey, President, Defense Aquisition University

Chief Learning Officer (ISSN 1935-8148) is published monthly, except bi-monthly in January/February and July/August by MediaTec Publishing Inc., 111 E. Wacker Dr., Suite 1200, Chicago IL 60601. Periodicals postage paid at Chicago, IL and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Chief Learning Officer, P.O. Box 8712 Lowell, MA 01853. Subscriptions are free to qualified professionals within the US and Canada. Digital free subscriptions are available worldwide. Nonqualified paid subscriptions are available at the subscription price of $199 for 10 issues. All countries outside the US and Canada must be prepaid in US funds with an additional $33 postage surcharge. Single price copy is $29.99

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ON THE COVER: PHOTO BY DAVID LUBARSKY

24


Profile

Ave Rio
Jesse Jackson leads JPMorgan Chase on a digital learning journey.

58


Case Study

Ave Rio
Fast-food giant Taco Bell created a searchable training library for a frequently changing menu.

62


Business Intelligence

Mike Prokopeak
Learning investment shows that leadership development remains a top priority for most organizations.

Features

18
Todd M. Warner
Relationships matter in organizations. Avoid overlooking them by embedding learning into the context of work and promoting connection and dialogue.
46
Sarah Fister Gale
Artificial intelligence may power the next generation of mentors, but can technology really replace a human touch?
52
Soren Eilertsen
The right leader can help an organization leverage tribal instinct for maximum business performance.

Experts

10
Michael E. Echols
Revising Beliefs, Behaviors and Value
12
Josh Bersin
Learning in the Flow of Work
14
Jack J. and Patti P. Phillips
Do You Have a CEO-Friendly Scorecard?
16
David DeFilippo
It’s Not All About the Technology
66
Joe Raelin
Learning Your Way Out

Resources

Are you a part of the CLO Network?

Business Impact


Revising Beliefs, Behaviors and Value

Reactions to the 2017 federal tax restructuring speak volumes By Michael E. Echols

Michael E. Echols is principal and founder of Human Capital LLC and author of “Your Future Is Calling.” He can be reached at editor@CLOmedia.com.

F

ew recent events have impacted beliefs and behaviors as rapidly as the federal tax code passed by U.S. Congress in December 2017. Within weeks of passage, a wave of corporate actions swept over the mantra of “the new normal” broadcast to defend sub-2 percent GDP growth. Actions spoke louder than words.

What, exactly, is the lesson to be learned? And how can that lesson be effectively applied to advance the goals of learning?

Let’s first examine the lesson itself. Deservedly, an immense amount of media is directed at the new tax law’s financial and economic implications. States with high state income and property taxes are squealing like stuck pigs about the unfairness of the law for residents within their state boundaries. At the same time, the vast majority of economists stalwartly defend their econometric models. Those models show that demographics and anemic productivity growth make 3 to 4 percent GDP growth impossible. The phrase “new normal” has proven to be a security blanket most mainstream economists have found extremely difficult to discard.

Best Practices


Learning in the Flow of Work

Make workflow-integrated learning a reality By Josh Bersin

Josh Bersin is founder of Bersin, known as Bersin by Deloitte, and a principal with Deloitte Consulting. He can be reached at editor@CLOmedia.com.

F

or years we have been talking about the need to integrate learning into the flow of work. This domain has been called performance support, on-demand learning, microlearning, adaptive learning and even learning nuggets. Today this ambitious idea is within reach.

I’ll start with a simple idea: Break all the learning programs you have into two types — micro and macro.

Microlearning content is short and focused enough to meet an immediate need. It is a video, article, blog, e-book, audio clip or other form of content that can be indexed and found easily.

An example of microlearning might be a software engineer who forgets the syntax for a certain type of data structure. They could look online, find an example, and quickly copy it or review it before continuing work. It might be a pricing guide, compliance overview or set of rules about how to log in or complete a transaction.

ACCOUNTABILITY


Do You Have a CEO-Friendly Scorecard?

An L&D scorecard can increase support and funding By Jack J. & Patti P. PhilLips

Jack J. Phillips is chairman and Patti P. Phillips is president and CEO of the ROI Institute. They can be reached at editor@CLOmedia.com.

I

n 2010, the ROI Institute conducted a major study sponsored by the Association for Talent Development to understand the executive view of learning and development investments. With responses from 96 Fortune 500 CEOs, the results were comprehensive, representing the largest input from this important group specifically on this topic. The initial results, presented in a keynote at the 2011 Chief Learning Officer Symposium, showed that the No. 1 measure of L&D investments preferred by executives is business impact, followed by ROI.

We also asked how many executives see a learning scorecard — only 22 percent said they did. However, we know from our work with ATD, CLO and others that most major learning functions have some kind of scorecard. The problem is that L&D scorecards usually are not presented to the top executives in organizations.

Why does this matter?

One of the questions in the ROI Institute’s study was, “What is your role in learning and development?” The No. 1 answer selected (78 percent) was: “I approve the budget with input from others.” The top executive is a major stakeholder in L&D with ultimate approval, and a meaningful scorecard is important — possibly even critical. The scorecard should offer insight into how L&D programs contribute to improvements in bottom-line measures.

So how should the scorecard be populated?

First, consider the inputs — or indicators — such as the number of people involved in programs, their involvement time and the investment in learning (per person). Executives want to see learning’s reach and costs.

on the front line


It’s Not All About the Technology

Technology can boost user experience, but it’s not the whole solution BY DAVE DeFILIPPO

Dave DeFilippo is chief people & learning officer for Suffolk. He can be reached at editor@CLOmedia.com.

I

have a pet peeve.

While the digital age has spawned technology that enables organizations and individuals to do more with a laptop, tablet or phone today than a mainframe computer in its heyday, I think this positive progress has led us to become somewhat lazy about the original reasons for these advances.

There — I said it. As blasphemous as this may sound, I began my career in the ’80s, and I remember a world of paper-based phone messages and no email. For learning and talent practitioners, I make this assertion so that we all remember to breathe a sigh of relief the next time we are asked to develop a training plan, job descriptions and any other underlying human capital support requirements for said technology.

By Todd M. Warner

Relationships matter in organizations. Avoid overlooking them by embedding learning into the context of work and promoting connection and dialogue.

We make many assumptions about organizational learning. Most of them are wrong.

On the surface we seem to know what organizational learning is: People attend programs or complete e-learning modules, they learn something new and they somehow become better. But this approach doesn’t represent how people in organizations actually learn. Hence we see massive failures across the board in the effectiveness of organizational learning.

As a result of this quandary, most organizations pursue efficiency in learning. They drive down internal learning budgets and replace costly face-to-face programs with less expensive e-learning solutions despite the fact that the completion rates of many e-learning modules are in the single digits. The thinking is “if it isn’t going to work it might as well be cheap and we should have a lot of it.” As a result, organizational learning is caught in a downward spiral of ineffectiveness.

What is missing from this assessment is that people are social and work is a social act. Despite our attempts to simplify employees’ tasks down to job descriptions and efficiently place them in a position on the hierarchical chart, relationships matter in organizations and we overlook them far too often.

By Todd M. Warner

Relationships matter in organizations. Avoid overlooking them by embedding learning into the context of work and promoting connection and dialogue.

We make many assumptions about organizational learning. Most of them are wrong.

On the surface we seem to know what organizational learning is: People attend programs or complete e-learning modules, they learn something new and they somehow become better. But this approach doesn’t represent how people in organizations actually learn. Hence we see massive failures across the board in the effectiveness of organizational learning.

As a result of this quandary, most organizations pursue efficiency in learning. They drive down internal learning budgets and replace costly face-to-face programs with less expensive e-learning solutions despite the fact that the completion rates of many e-learning modules are in the single digits. The thinking is “if it isn’t going to work it might as well be cheap and we should have a lot of it.” As a result, organizational learning is caught in a downward spiral of ineffectiveness.

What is missing from this assessment is that people are social and work is a social act. Despite our attempts to simplify employees’ tasks down to job descriptions and efficiently place them in a position on the hierarchical chart, relationships matter in organizations and we overlook them far too often.

Despite the amount of money organizations invest in content and experts for learning programs, it is the relationships that participants value the most. The highest rated item on almost every organizational learning program’s smile sheet assessment is networking. This ranking is frequently dismissed as nice but inconsequential yet it teaches us a lot about what is missing from organizational learning.

The reality is that content is now a commodity. If people want to learn something new, they can go to TED, Khan Academy or a myriad of other locations that offer content for free. What people yearn for is context and connection — ways to make the social aspect of work more meaningful and impactful. Real learning is social in organizations and people — through their scores on smile sheets — have been telling us this for years.

Profile


Accidental CLO, Intentional Learning

Building on decades of experience at JPMorgan Chase, Jesse Jackson leads the firm on a digital learning journey.

By Ave Rio

photos by David Lubarsky

Aself-proclaimed “accidental CLO,” Jesse Jackson has served in numerous roles at the multinational banking and financial services firm JPMorgan Chase & Co. After completing five years of active duty in the U.S. Navy, he joined the bank’s management development program more than 25 years ago, starting as a teller and a banker. He eventually moved on to consumer banking management roles such as sales manager, branch manager and division sales manager.

Jackson said his career path has been opportunistic. “It’s about crushing the job that you’re doing very effectively and performing as well as possible, and as a result, other opportunities will open,” he said. “As jobs are being destroyed, new jobs are being created. Individuals should not necessarily be focused on a set of jobs as opposed to a set of skill sets and attributes needed to perform effectively.”

5 Learning & Development Metrics That Actually Matter to the C-Suite

Track these KPIs, Earn Your Seat at the Table

By Doug Stephen, SVP of Enterprise Learning, CGS

In PwC’s most recent global CEO survey, roughly 75% of respondents ranked Availability of Key Skills as a top concern affecting their organization’s growth prospects. Only Over Regulation and Uncertain Economic Growth ranked higher. The implication is clear: CEOs recognize the crucial reliance on a workforce with the right skills. The need is especially true given the rapid advances in workplace technology and the persistent skills gap for those workers with outdated or underdeveloped skills.

Since businesses continue to invest in learning and talent management, one can reasonably assume that these programs deliver results. Nevertheless, in CGS’s annual research report on the top priorities for L&D executives, aligning learning with business priorities and ROI continues to be a top-three challenge.¹

Rethinking Talent Management

A Brave New World

By Kati Frazier and Lisa Cannell

Overview

Lisa Cannell, Managing Director and CHRO at the UVA Darden School of Business, set out to learn answers to the questions: “What talent management practices have stood the test of time in companies, which ones are changing, and why? What impact are these changes having on talent management leaders today?” She conducted 50 interviews with a variety of industries, including a majority of Fortune 500 companies, to get to the source of the driving forces of change.

As can be expected, the interviews with such diverse companies revealed that companies fall on a broad spectrum of approaches to talent management and organizational design. Some are committed to completely rebuilding talent management systems within their organizations; some are committed to their tried & true approaches. While the differences in industry influenced some of the changes, they all reported on macro trends that are shaping their future.

Getting the most out of your training system

Using the DuPont Capability Engine for assessment and data collection

By George Haber, Ph.D.

Learning and Development (L&D) activity is often challenged with proving its own value. L&D investments are often difficult to connect directly with operational outcomes. Even if these correlations are proven, they often take time to have measurable impact. This delay in correlative evidence creates a risk. If errors are made in the initial planning and executions of such programs, it could lead to a contaminated embedding of knowledge, skill and performance.

DuPont’s Capability Engine is a system design that when fully integrated, provides immediate and in-real-time feedback about the learning systems and operational applications the learning system is meant to impact. Continuous assessment data from multiple sources provide actionable data that allows for early corrections in any L&D campaign.

Driven by complexity and fueled by rapid change, the practice of leadership development continues to evolve.

By almost any measure, Scott Kriens was a successful leader.

After taking over as CEO of Juniper Networks Inc. in 1996, the veteran technology entrepreneur led the company’s growth into a global powerhouse by supplying the routers, switches, software and networking products that form the infrastructure of the internet economy. But when his father died in 2004 it forced Kriens to hit the pause button.

“It was a really difficult time in my life,” said Kriens. “I was ignoring a lot of things. I was ignoring my personal life and my relationship at home.”

After years of charging hard, Kriens began to reflect on his leadership journey and what came next. “It really became clear that being a leader meant being a skilled practitioner of relationships,” he said. “Being able to be in authentic relationships and show up in a way that could be trusted and relied upon by other people.”

That insight was so powerful that when he retired as Juniper CEO in 2009, he and his wife Joanie founded the 1440 Foundation, a nonprofit that takes its name from the 1,440 minutes in the day. While Kriens remains chairman of the board at Juniper, his focus is now trained on the foundation and 1440 Multiversity, the 75-acre campus that is part conference facility, spa, lodge and education center they built on the redwood-filled grounds of a former bible college near Santa Cruz, California.

Driven by complexity and fueled by rapid change, the practice of leadership development continues to evolve.

By almost any measure, Scott Kriens was a successful leader.

After taking over as CEO of Juniper Networks Inc. in 1996, the veteran technology entrepreneur led the company’s growth into a global powerhouse by supplying the routers, switches, software and networking products that form the infrastructure of the internet economy. But when his father died in 2004 it forced Kriens to hit the pause button.

“It was a really difficult time in my life,” said Kriens. “I was ignoring a lot of things. I was ignoring my personal life and my relationship at home.”

After years of charging hard, Kriens began to reflect on his leadership journey and what came next. “It really became clear that being a leader meant being a skilled practitioner of relationships,” he said. “Being able to be in authentic relationships and show up in a way that could be trusted and relied upon by other people.”

That insight was so powerful that when he retired as Juniper CEO in 2009, he and his wife Joanie founded the 1440 Foundation, a nonprofit that takes its name from the 1,440 minutes in the day. While Kriens remains chairman of the board at Juniper, his focus is now trained on the foundation and 1440 Multiversity, the 75-acre campus that is part conference facility, spa, lodge and education center they built on the redwood-filled grounds of a former bible college near Santa Cruz, California.

When It Comes to Gender Bias in Leadership, Talk is Cheap

Despite the fact that women earn almost 60 percent of undergraduate degrees and 60 percent of master’s degrees in the U.S., they comprise only 25 percent of executive- and senior-level officials and managers, hold 20 percent of board seats, and only 6 percent are CEOs, according to the “Women’s Leadership Gap” report by The Center for American Progress.

According to a 2017 study by Lee Hecht Harrison, “Elevating Women in Leadership,” organizations see this as a problem but haven’t been successful in fixing it. The study found that 82 percent of organizations surveyed believe advancing women is a critical business issue — yet only 28 percent of HR leaders are satisfied with their organization’s ability to do so.

Jill Ihsanullah, senior vice president of consulting at consulting firm Linkage Inc., said many organizations and leaders are well-intentioned, but they don’t follow through. “Organizations will say all the right things about advancing women, but when it comes down to it, the decision they make is to promote a man,” she said.

A 2016 American Association of University Women report, “Barriers and Bias: The Status of Women in Leadership,” found that the lack of women in leadership roles can be examined through structural barriers preventing women’s ascent to leadership and the gender bias that continues to affect them in the workplace.

As the younger workforce moves into higher-level roles, generational leadership differences provide insight into where leadership development should focus.

By Marygrace Schumann

The face of leadership is starting to shift. According to “Global Generations,” a study conducted by accounting firm EY, 62 percent of millennial employees are managing others — only slightly less than the 65 percent of Generation X employees who are managers.

As younger employees move into more powerful positions, it’s important to consider how their leadership styles compare with those who came before them. Are they the virtually the same or dramatically different? How can we best help them grow as business leaders?

As the younger workforce moves into higher-level roles, generational leadership differences provide insight into where leadership development should focus.

By Marygrace Schumann

The face of leadership is starting to shift. According to “Global Generations,” a study conducted by accounting firm EY, 62 percent of millennial employees are managing others — only slightly less than the 65 percent of Generation X employees who are managers.

As younger employees move into more powerful positions, it’s important to consider how their leadership styles compare with those who came before them. Are they the virtually the same or dramatically different? How can we best help them grow as business leaders?

Not only has she cracked the code for successful online dating in her book the “Data, A Love Story” but the founder of the Future Today Institute, Amy Webb convincingly explains “the future” isn’t a concept that just happens to us submissively. In her Washington Post Best Seller that has also been named #1 Best Seller on Amazon and recipient of the Gold Axiom Medal Winner for Best Book About Business & Technology- “The Signals Are Talking”- the NYU Stern School of Business professor presents us with the opportunity to see ahead, giving us the chance to forecast what’s to come, as Amy regularly has to answer to the question “What does the future hold for us?” when advising her Fortune 500 and Global 1000 clients.

How do we predict the future when we live in what seems to be an increasingly unpredictable world?

MIT mathematician Edward Lorenz once observed that “only one thing can happen next,” and that the impact of that act — whatever it is — changes everything else that follows. You know this as the “butterfly effect,” but this is the heart of chaos theory. Because we acknowledge that chaos is real and that chaotic events will at some point occur, as futurists our goal is not to predict, with total accuracy, what will happen x-number of years from now. Instead, the goal is to reduce the ambiguity — to develop probable, plausible and possible scenarios using data and evidence.

Artificial intelligence may power the next generation of mentors, but can technology really replace a human touch?

By Sarah Fister Gale

In 2017, Slice, a New York tech company that builds software solutions for independent pizzerias, had a management problem.

The company’s tech staff is based in Macedonia, where high unemployment rates mean most of their new hires have never held a formal job prior to Slice. “We have a lot of first-time managers who need coaching,” said Rick Pereira, chief people officer.

Instead of moving to Macedonia himself, Pereira implemented Butterfly.ai, an artificial intelligence coaching app that provides feedback to managers on their leadership skills. The tool uses anonymous employee survey results and past performance data to rate managers’ performance, then offers tips and training content to help them improve.

Pereira, who is able to review all of the feedback, said it has helped many of his team members become better managers, including their general manager who initially had a gruff communication style. “People loved what he was saying but not how he said it,” Pereira said. Based on consistent feedback about the general manager’s rough approach, the Butterfly coach recommended a series of communication courses and articles. “Now he’s one of our strongest leaders,” Pereira said.

Artificial intelligence may power the next generation of mentors, but can technology really replace a human touch?

By Sarah Fister Gale

In 2017, Slice, a New York tech company that builds software solutions for independent pizzerias, had a management problem.

The company’s tech staff is based in Macedonia, where high unemployment rates mean most of their new hires have never held a formal job prior to Slice. “We have a lot of first-time managers who need coaching,” said Rick Pereira, chief people officer.

Instead of moving to Macedonia himself, Pereira implemented Butterfly.ai, an artificial intelligence coaching app that provides feedback to managers on their leadership skills. The tool uses anonymous employee survey results and past performance data to rate managers’ performance, then offers tips and training content to help them improve.

Pereira, who is able to review all of the feedback, said it has helped many of his team members become better managers, including their general manager who initially had a gruff communication style. “People loved what he was saying but not how he said it,” Pereira said. Based on consistent feedback about the general manager’s rough approach, the Butterfly coach recommended a series of communication courses and articles. “Now he’s one of our strongest leaders,” Pereira said.

The right leader can help an organization leverage tribal instinct for maximum business performance.

By Soren Eilertsen

Evolutionarily speaking, humans are conditioned to seek affiliation through families and tribes. These groups band together and establish rules to create a sense of safety and belonging, fight a common enemy or accomplish something meaningful.

In business, tribes are often social groups linked by a leader, shared purpose or goal, common culture or organizational boundary.

Belonging to a tribe in business can infuse hope among team members and awaken collaborative instincts. Tribe members frequently identify key competitors and work collectively to defeat them.

However, affiliation with a tribe can be strong enough to result in protectiveness of the tribe, which, coupled with competitiveness, can override individual moral integrity. The tribal force can backfire, causing silos to form and halting collaboration.

Businesses can either become victims of this force or leverage tribal instinct for maximum business performance.

The right leader can help an organization leverage tribal instinct for maximum business performance.

By Soren Eilertsen

Evolutionarily speaking, humans are conditioned to seek affiliation through families and tribes. These groups band together and establish rules to create a sense of safety and belonging, fight a common enemy or accomplish something meaningful.

In business, tribes are often social groups linked by a leader, shared purpose or goal, common culture or organizational boundary.

Belonging to a tribe in business can infuse hope among team members and awaken collaborative instincts. Tribe members frequently identify key competitors and work collectively to defeat them.

However, affiliation with a tribe can be strong enough to result in protectiveness of the tribe, which, coupled with competitiveness, can override individual moral integrity. The tribal force can backfire, causing silos to form and halting collaboration.

Businesses can either become victims of this force or leverage tribal instinct for maximum business performance.

Case Study


Yo Quiero Learning!

By Ave Rio

G

hosts of menus past include the Naked Chicken Chalupa, Cheetos Burrito and Chicken Biscuit Taco. The Mexican-inspired fast-food giant Taco Bell is known for creating unique limited-time offers multiple times a year. But with each new menu item comes the need to train employees on how to prepare and serve it.

That’s where Taco Bell saw room for improvement. Ferril Onyett, director of learning and organizational development at Yum, Taco Bell’s parent company, said the past couple of years have been a journey to simplify and enhance team member experience.

“We wanted to make it easier for employees to get training materials and easier to understand why we launch the products that we do and how it relates to our customer insights,” she said. “It’s been quite a challenge going from all in-person training six or seven years ago to more of a blended approach with online, on-the-job activities and classroom learning.”

Business Intelligence


Follow the Leader(ship) Spending

Learning investment shows that leadership development remains a top priority for most organizations.

By Mike Prokopeak

A

s some wisecracker once noted, the war for talent is over. The talent won.

Corporations are waving the white flag, recognizing that simply competing to attract the best and brightest is not enough to maintain their edge. The scarcity of in-demand talent and high cost of attracting and retaining them makes that an expensive proposition.

Instead many are setting their sights on inside talent. Developing the next generation of leaders is the top priority for a majority of organizations, according to a recent survey of more than 28,000 business leaders conducted by The Conference Board.

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in conclusion


Learning Your Way Out

Action learning can develop leadership as a collaborative practice By Joe Raelin

Joe Raelin holds the Knowles Chair of Practice-Oriented Education at Northeastern University and is principal of the firm The Leaderful Consultancy. He can be reached at editor@CLOmedia.com.

L

eadership in the current knowledge era cannot rely on a single source of expertise; rather, it needs to be a collaborative practice. We need to respond to complexity in our internal and external markets through the contribution and creativity of all stakeholders.

At the same time, how might we bring this focus on collaboration to a practice-based method of learning? Instead of relying on traditional teacher-to-student instruction, we would need to expose learners to live engagements and then have them collectively reflect on those experiences to expand and even create knowledge while working to improve the given practice.

When it comes to developing practice-based collaborative leadership and management, it is axiomatic that we begin by immersing managers in their own practices, not removing them from their lived experience. For the sake of learning, we may choose to accelerate the process by having facilitators place managers in problem domains or dilemmas to see how they might “learn their way out.” The critical change facilitators would make is to introduce novel forms of conversation that can bring out the skills of collaborative learning and dialogue. Learners would engage in empathic listening, understand the value of reflecting on perspectives different from their own and entertain the prospect of being changed by what they learn. This collaborative process opens up space for innovative ways to accomplish work or even reconceive how the work should be done.

Thanks for reading our April 2018 issue!