Chief Learning Officer
April 2019
Chief Learning Officer
April 2019

Editor’s Letter


Kung Fu Leadership
Mike Prokopeak Editor in Chief
I

love kung fu movies.

Go ahead and judge me. It’s one of my healthier vices. Gulping down sugary sweet Swedish Fish like a barking seal on a bender? Not so much.

It’s not just me that enjoys the occasional martial arts flick. Successful movies can gross more than $150 million from a legion of international fans. That’s not to mention the success the genre’s stars have gone on to experience since kung fu burst onto the global cinema scene in the 1970s.

Jackie Chan, Michelle Yeoh and Chuck Norris all kicked their way to box office stardom. Academy Award-winning directors Ang Lee and Quentin Tarantino tackled the genre in breakthrough films like “Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon” and the “Kill Bill” series. Angelina Jolie and Jack Black brought it to a new generation of budding martial artists through the “Kung Fu Panda” movies.

APRIL 2019 | Volume 18, Issue 3

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Free,
Live,
Online.
Chief Learning Officer is pleased to offer live and on‑demand webinars!
UPCOMING!
MAR 20
The Skills Currency: Unlocking Internal Mobility With Real Skills Data
MAR 21
Develop and Maximize your Top Talent
PREVIOUSLY AIRED!
MAR 14
Attacking the Challenges of Aligning Learning to Organizational Goals and Bottom-Line Results
Check out more previously aired webinars at CLOmedia.com/on-demand/
Available live on the air date and on demand for one year after unless otherwise specified.
Check them out today and keep the education going!
Chief Learning Officer - April 2019
Chief Learning Officer - April 2019
Chief Learning Officer - April 2019
on the cover: photo provided by Discover

10


Jesse Jackson of JPMorgan Chase shares his career journey; EY’s Brenda Sugrue talks about user-driven learning strategies; and people share what they’re reading these days.
32


Profile

Agatha Bordonaro
At Discover Financial Services, Jon Kaplan infuses learning with humanity and humility.

56


Case Study

Sarah Fister Gale
Infosys’ open-source, user-friendly learning platform draws 10,000 learners daily and enables the company to drive a culture of continuous upskilling.

58


Business Intelligence

Ashley St. John
Women and minorities are scarce in leadership roles. Lack of targeted leadership development offerings could be a contributing factor.

Chief Learning Officer - April 2019
Uncertainty: Learning’s Final Frontier
Searching for a Higher Purpose
Debunking the Meritocracy Myth
A Tale of Student Debt

Features

24
Randall P. White
Learning leaders can help prepare their people to feel comfortable with ambiguity and uncertainty.
38
Michael E. Echols
Organizations have a stake in mounting student debt issues. Better investment decisions can help individuals and companies.
Leadership Development


44
Ave Rio
Understanding millennial expectations around leadership development can help learning leaders retain more young workers.
52
Rosina L. Racioppi
Developing women leaders requires an all-in mentality.

Experts

16
Michael E. Echols
Uncertainty Is the Future Certainty
18
Elliott Masie
Take the Humdrum Out of Homework
20
Jack J. Phillips & Patti P. Phillips
Predicting Learning Success
22
David DeFilippo
Friends and Family Feedback
62
Krissi Barr
Sniffing Out Strong Leaders

Resources

4
Kung Fu Leadership
Your Career


Your Career


Career Advice From

Jesse Jackson

Chief Learning Officer of Consumer and Community Banking, JPMorgan Chase

Jesse Jackson, CLO of consumer and community banking for JPMorgan Chase, shares his career journey and how he came into L&D.
Career Advice from Kathleen Gallo
Jesse Jackson

What’s been your carrer path?

My role as a CLO for JPMorgan Chase, specifically with our consumer community banking business, is a bit nontraditional. I didn’t come up through a normal HR program; I had the privilege to enter the bank through our management development program. I spent time in our consumer community banking group as a general manager moving through various roles, predominantly for our branch banking business. I also had the opportunity to move into our commercial bank, where I served as an underwriter and as a commercial banker lending to hallmark names in the New York marketplace. Additionally, I supported the business, specifically the commercial bank, as a client service manager for our global network. Having worked within the commercial bank for a number of years, I also transitioned back into business banking, which is one of the sublines of businesses within the consumer community bank. It was in that role where the opportunity to transition into the chief learning officer role emerged. It allowed me to meet and work with another set of leaders within business focused on some of the same goals and objectives as we think about truly enhancing and transforming the experiences that we deliver to our clients across the globe.

The most important part of learning is:
The beginning, the middle and the end. Learning is lifelong, and we should all maximize each part of the journey.
The most overrated trend in L&D is:
Virtual reality. While it has significant promise, current price points make wide adoption impractical.
The most overrated trend in L&D is:
Virtual reality. While it has significant promise, current price points make wide adoption impractical.
Your Career


Your Career


What Are You Reading?
Life 3.0: Being Human in the Age of Artificial Intelligence by Max Tegmark
Life 3.0: Being Human in the Age of Artificial Intelligence
By Max Tegmark
How will artificial intelligence affect jobs? The author provides insight to the general reader on how AI is increasingly mimicking the human brain and what the repercussions can be to organizations, the workforce and humanity at large depending on how we train, treat and talk about AI. As Elon Musk describes, the book is a “compelling guide to the challenges and choices we need to consider in our quest for understanding and leveraging AI.” This is of particular interest to CLOs and L&D teams because it provides a solid background on AI and arms CLOs with answers on how AI can and will impact learning and development.
Chanda Frenton
Marina Theodotou, learning faculty, Defense Acquisition University
Your Career


Your Career


Top of Mind
Balancing Guidance With User-Driven Learning Strategies By Brenda Sugrue
Brenda Sugrue, EY global chief learning officer and Chief Learning Officer magazine’s 2018 CLO of the Year, explains why and how the learning organization provides guidance for learners.
Brenda Sugrue
Fred Harburg on the The Growth Mindset Culture for Leadership Development.

As the volume of learning content explodes, how do we guide learners to make good choices? How do we ensure that fast content, like fast food, has the nutritional ingredients that the human mind, like the human body, needs? How do we avoid empty calories and wasted time spent searching for relevant material? How can we engineer the fastest path to expertise and avoid cognitive overload?

Recent research by global research and advisory firm Gartner indicates that when organizations move to self-serve and user-driven content strategies, learning and performance suffer. Learners are overwhelmed and confused. This reaffirms academic research published in the 2006 Educational Psychologist article, “Why Minimal Guidance During Instruction Doesn’t Work,” which concludes that, when left to their own devices, learners do not know what learning activities are best for them.

BUSINESS IMPACT


Uncertainty Is the Future Certainty

We need a strategy to face it head on By Michael E. Echols

Michael E. Echols is principal and founder of Human Capital LLC

Michael E. Echols is principal and founder of Human Capital LLC and author of “Your Future Is Calling.”
He can be reached at editor@CLOmedia.com.

U

ncertainty — it’s the one thing in our future that is certain. Look to our politics and financial markets for affirmation. But what does it mean for learning? And what are the issues learning leaders need to address to set priorities in the face of growing uncertainty?

The driver is a darling of our contemporary world: innovation.

Innovation is not new. It has always been a part of life in America. Agriculture at the time of our nation’s founding was more than 90 percent of the U.S. economy. Today it is less than 2 percent. That massive shift is compelling evidence that something big has been going on for a very long time. Now change is accelerating.

imperatives


Take the Humdrum Out of Homework

Making workplace homework effective By Elliott Masie

Chief Learning Officer author, Elliot Masie's headshot.

Elliott Masie is CEO of The Masie Center, an international think tank focused on learning and workplace productivity, and chairman and CLO of The Masie Center’s Learning Consortium.
He can be reached at editor@CLOmedia.com.

S

tudents have come to expect and accept homework as an element of the learning process. But what about homework for learners in the workplace?

If we imagine homework as a reading assignment or a lesson, our learners generally will not respond well. A great example of this includes the pretraining readings that many organizations send out to participants in leadership development programs. If I am one of those participants, I will probably skim the articles on the plane ride to the leadership retreat.

Your colleagues are busy, distracted and often are not confident that the assigned readings are essential to their learnings. But homework for workplace learners can be effective if we design it in a creative, engaging and user experience-validated format.

ACCOUNTABILITY


Predicting Learning Success

Predictions of success should be part of the evaluation mix BY JACK J. PHILLIPS AND PATTI P. PHILLIPS

Jack J. Phillips, ROI Institute chairman
Patti P. Phillips, ROI Institute president and CEO

Jack J. Phillips is the chairman and Patti P. Phillips is president and CEO of the ROI Institute.
They can be reached at editor@CLOmedia.com.

P

art of the evaluation mix should be the predictions of success. Predictions serve as leading indicators of success and facilitate process improvement. Think about the logical chain of value from any learning program: level 1, reaction; level 2, learning; level 3, application; level 4, impact; and level 5, ROI. We know from experience that programs are evaluated infrequently at level 3, less often at level 4 and rarely at level 5. Unfortunately, these are data sets executives would like to see.

But can we use the lower levels to predict the higher levels? The answer is yes, but first, there are four issues that should be explored.

Precondition versus prediction. Sometimes, one level is a precondition to another, but not necessarily a predictor. For example, learning is a precondition for application, but just because a participant learned doesn’t mean there will be application.

Barriers and enablers. For any program to achieve success, there are often barriers, which get in the way of actually using the learning. Enablers help participants learn and apply that learning. Barriers and enablers can inhibit or distort predictions.

on the front line


Friends and Family Feedback

Expanding the 360-degree assessment process BY David Defilippo

David DeFilippo

David DeFilippo is principal of DeFilippo Leadership Inc. and an executive coach at Harvard Business School.
He can be reached at editor@CLOmedia.com.

A

s part of the learning and leadership development portfolio, the practice of 360-degree assessments or multisource feedback is a tried-and-true method to identify strengths and weaknesses. Simply put, I think of the 360-degree assessment process as a way to help individuals understand the actions they should keep taking to become more effective and also to identify those behaviors to stop doing or change that get in the way of their success.

Tracing its commercial beginnings to the ESSO Research and Engineering Co. in the 1950s, the multi-rater process entails gathering feedback from subordinates, peers, supervisors and customers in order to provide insight into employees’ strengths and weaknesses for the purposes of professional development. Further popularized as a leadership development and performance management best practice among firms, a 2016 Forbes article by Jack Zenger estimated that more than 85 percent of Fortune 500 companies use 360-degree feedback as part of their human capital development portfolio.

Uncertainty Learning leaders
Learning leaders can help prepare their people to understand and feel comfortable with ambiguity and uncertainty — and their organizations will reap the benefits.
By Randall P. White
The opening of the sci-fi television series “Star Trek” told us space is the final frontier to which only a few elite travelers would “boldly go.” It was inferred that the rest of us would stay safely on Earth where living was as stable and predictable as NBC’s programming schedule.

In 1987, well before the end of the 20th century, Michael Stipe, of the band REM, wrote the lyric, “It’s the end of the world as we know it,” assaulting us with a dizzying kaleidoscope of world-changing events that we were all powerless to alter.

Fast forward to the attacks of 9/11, Arab Spring followed by Arab chaos, Brexit, Donald Trump’s election and unorthodox presidency, social media concepts growing out of control, and all of our most private and marketable data being tossed to the digital wind.

We can’t ignore uncertainty today. It’s harder than ever to pretend anything is certain.

Have we reached the final frontier? Will we be continually forging into the unknown of occurrences, consequences and disasters that nobody can predict?

Yes, and we need to come out of denial about it.

Learning's Final Frontier
Uncertainty Learning leaders
Learning leaders can help prepare their people to understand and feel comfortable with ambiguity and uncertainty — and their organizations will reap the benefits.
By Randall P. White
The opening of the sci-fi television series “Star Trek” told us space is the final frontier to which only a few elite travelers would “boldly go.” It was inferred that the rest of us would stay safely on Earth where living was as stable and predictable as NBC’s programming schedule.

In 1987, well before the end of the 20th century, Michael Stipe, of the band REM, wrote the lyric, “It’s the end of the world as we know it,” assaulting us with a dizzying kaleidoscope of world-changing events that we were all powerless to alter.

Fast forward to the attacks of 9/11, Arab Spring followed by Arab chaos, Brexit, Donald Trump’s election and unorthodox presidency, social media concepts growing out of control, and all of our most private and marketable data being tossed to the digital wind.

We can’t ignore uncertainty today. It’s harder than ever to pretend anything is certain.

Have we reached the final frontier? Will we be continually forging into the unknown of occurrences, consequences and disasters that nobody can predict?

Yes, and we need to come out of denial about it.

Learning's Final Frontier
Sponsored Content
Sponsored Content
How L&D supports the leaders of tomorrow

Leveraging succession planning within L&D to build a healthy pipeline

By Adina Sapp, edited by Tim Harnett

Throughout all the changes to the workplace over the past several decades, it’s clear that the need to develop employees is something business leaders should take seriously. Results from LinkedIn’s 2018 Workplace Learning Report show that talent devel-opers, executives and people managers agree that providing resources to enable talent is crucial to the business. There is a consensus that learning and development programs are a necessary benefit to employees. Intangible priorities (job creation, career development, improving people’s lives) should be included as successful indicators of business performance.

While succession planning and talent pipeline creation could often be an end result of employee development, it may turn out to be a lengthy process. Identifying top talent early, readying candidates for promotion and then moving employees through jobs to prepare them for future opportunities could take years.

Profile


Putting People First

At Discover Financial Services, Jon Kaplan infuses learning with humanity and humility.

By Agatha Bordonaro

At Discover Financial Services, Jon Kaplan infuses learning with humanity and humility.

When it comes to learning, Jon Kaplan truly understands the importance of emotional engagement. Growing up south of San Francisco, the self-described “terrible student” found himself, in the fourth grade, unable to read — but hid it from everyone he knew, including his teachers. “I was really good at faking people out,” he said. “I was able to pay attention to social cues, and I learned how to cheat on multiple-choice tests.”

Kaplan finally confessed his secret to a classmate and got the remedial help he needed, but by then he had become “incredibly ashamed” and his academic performance suffered through grade school.

However, that all changed when Kaplan made a new friend in high school — one who “was very driven academically,” he recalled. “And I remember a light went off in my head: ‘Oh, I can try.’ I started trying, and I did really well after that.”

“I

t was the best of times, it was the worst of times” — so it is with learning today. What can be done to increase the best while dialing down the worst? Companies have a stake in the results as well as an active role to play.

The $1.5 trillion in student debt represents both the best and the worst and serves as the foundation for this conversation. On the best side, it represents the willingness of young people to invest personal capital in themselves. The eventual potential cost to American taxpayers of $600 billion, however, is part of the worst.

How individual investments in education are being made is a real problem. The initial corporate impact of these personal decisions is the critical issue of finding and recruiting new workers with needed skills. And companies are not helping themselves.

The Debt Dilemma

Historically, investment in a college degree has been viewed as a matter of individual choice largely paid for by the individual. Governments were the primary source of public funds for these investments in the form of state-subsidized tuition at land grant schools and federal student loans. For a long time, the system worked. In the twentieth century, state budgets could subsidize tuition costs. These public subsidies made a college degree affordable for students and their families. Those days are over.

“I

t was the best of times, it was the worst of times” — so it is with learning today. What can be done to increase the best while dialing down the worst? Companies have a stake in the results as well as an active role to play.

The $1.5 trillion in student debt represents both the best and the worst and serves as the foundation for this conversation. On the best side, it represents the willingness of young people to invest personal capital in themselves. The eventual potential cost to American taxpayers of $600 billion, however, is part of the worst.

How individual investments in education are being made is a real problem. The initial corporate impact of these personal decisions is the critical issue of finding and recruiting new workers with needed skills. And companies are not helping themselves.

The Debt Dilemma

Historically, investment in a college degree has been viewed as a matter of individual choice largely paid for by the individual. Governments were the primary source of public funds for these investments in the form of state-subsidized tuition at land grant schools and federal student loans. For a long time, the system worked. In the twentieth century, state budgets could subsidize tuition costs. These public subsidies made a college degree affordable for students and their families. Those days are over.

Special Report Leadership Development
Uncertainty Learning leaders
Understanding millennial expectations and perceptions about leadership development can help learning leaders retain more young workers, improve company culture and benefit the bottom line.
By Ave Rio
Stacey Engle worked her way up to become the president of the company she began her career with almost a decade ago. In 2009, she joined Fierce Conversations as an account executive/marketing lead, and as of November 2018, she was running the leadership development and training company that focuses on helping clients have effective conversations. And she’s only 33.

While Fierce, a small, growing company, doesn’t have a formal leadership development program, Engle said company leaders and mentors taught her how the business works and gave her a sense of connection to the company.

Searching for a Higher Purpose
Uncertainty Learning leaders
Understanding millennial expectations and perceptions about leadership development can help learning leaders retain more young workers, improve company culture and benefit the bottom line.
By Ave Rio
Stacey Engle worked her way up to become the president of the company she began her career with almost a decade ago. In 2009, she joined Fierce Conversations as an account executive/marketing lead, and as of November 2018, she was running the leadership development and training company that focuses on helping clients have effective conversations. And she’s only 33.

While Fierce, a small, growing company, doesn’t have a formal leadership development program, Engle said company leaders and mentors taught her how the business works and gave her a sense of connection to the company.

Symposium Preview
Q&A with Karla Star Title

Luck seems intangible, one of the few parts of life that we have no control over.

That’s why people think of gambling and sports when they think of luck in the random aspects of those endeavors: it’s only in those situations where we can clearly see which elements are beyond our control. In real life, we have no idea how much our actions will influence the outcomes, so it’s adaptive to assume that we can control a lot more than we realize. This motivates us to focus on our part and improve what we bring to the table, which can only help the ultimate outcome.

Karla Starr
Symposium Preview
Q&A with Karla Star Title

Luck seems intangible, one of the few parts of life that we have no control over.

That’s why people think of gambling and sports when they think of luck in the random aspects of those endeavors: it’s only in those situations where we can clearly see which elements are beyond our control. In real life, we have no idea how much our actions will influence the outcomes, so it’s adaptive to assume that we can control a lot more than we realize. This motivates us to focus on our part and improve what we bring to the table, which can only help the ultimate outcome.

Special Report Leadership Development
Debunking the Meritocracy Myth Title
Developing women leaders requires an all-in mentality.
By Rosina L. Racioppi
A few years ago, I was the keynote speaker at a women’s diversity conference. That morning, I was chatting with Annie McKee, director of the University of Pennsylvania CLO program. We are both from the same generation, having entered the workforce with the hope of a more promising future for women in corporations. As we got ready to go into the conference, Annie asked me, “Why aren’t we seeing more success in advancing women? Did we drop the ball?”

I’ve often thought about Annie’s question and my best answer is that there are a lot of us who have dropped the ball and even more who didn’t realize the ball was in play. That being said, we have made progress, and my goal is to help corporations continue to do so.

The Meritocracy Fallacy
Unfortunately, many women and corporate leaders continue to cling to what I call the “meritocracy fallacy.” It’s the belief that female talent will be noticed and promoted to leadership roles and, as a result, gender parity will be achieved. If that were the case, we would have been at parity years ago, since large numbers of talented women have been part of the workforce for almost half a century and, today, the workforce is more than 50 percent women.
Debunking the Meritocracy Myth Title
Developing women leaders requires an all-in mentality.
By Rosina L. Racioppi
A few years ago, I was the keynote speaker at a women’s diversity conference. That morning, I was chatting with Annie McKee, director of the University of Pennsylvania CLO program. We are both from the same generation, having entered the workforce with the hope of a more promising future for women in corporations. As we got ready to go into the conference, Annie asked me, “Why aren’t we seeing more success in advancing women? Did we drop the ball?”

I’ve often thought about Annie’s question and my best answer is that there are a lot of us who have dropped the ball and even more who didn’t realize the ball was in play. That being said, we have made progress, and my goal is to help corporations continue to do so.

The Meritocracy Fallacy
Unfortunately, many women and corporate leaders continue to cling to what I call the “meritocracy fallacy.” It’s the belief that female talent will be noticed and promoted to leadership roles and, as a result, gender parity will be achieved. If that were the case, we would have been at parity years ago, since large numbers of talented women have been part of the workforce for almost half a century and, today, the workforce is more than 50 percent women.
The Meritocracy Fallacy
Unfortunately, many women and corporate leaders continue to cling to what I call the “meritocracy fallacy.” It’s the belief that female talent will be noticed and promoted to leadership roles and, as a result, gender parity will be achieved. If that were the case, we would have been at parity years ago, since large numbers of talented women have been part of the workforce for almost half a century and, today, the workforce is more than 50 percent women.

Case Study


The Success of Lex

BY SARAH FISTER GALE

I

nfosys has always been committed to continuous education for its employees. The global IT business consulting and outsourcing services firm headquartered in Bengaluru, India, has more than 200,000 employees in 87 countries, and they rely on a continuous stream of content and learning opportunities to stay up to date on the latest technology, business and leadership trends. “Everyone who works at Infosys has to upskill continuously,” said Thirumala Arohi, Infosys vice president and head of education, training and assessments in Bengaluru. “It has always been part of who we are and what we do.”

But for years, Infosys’ learning delivery was decentralized, with multiple apps offering a subset of content targeting different employee groups or learning needs, including an app offering just tech training for service delivery people and another for client-facing staff who needed to rapidly review a topic or trend. But in October 2017, the learning and development team decided they needed a more centralized learning platform to keep up with everyone’s learning needs. They envisioned a single destination for learning content where every employee could pursue all kinds of training and managers could see what their people were learning and where there were gaps.

Business Intelligence


Seeking Targeted Talent Development
Women are scarce in leadership roles. Lack of targeted leadership development offerings could be a contributing factor.

By Ashley St. John

O

n Feb. 26, Chicago voters narrowed the giant field of 2019 mayoral candidates from 14 to two in an historic election that will send two African-American female candidates to an April runoff election. The winner will be the city’s first African-American female mayor.

It’s an exciting time, as more women and people of color are moving into leadership positions in both government and business. But it’s safe to say there’s still plenty of room for improvement. According to 2019 data from Catalyst, women — particularly minority women — are still scarce in corporate leadership roles: In S&P 500 companies, women represent 26.5 percent of executive and senior-level officials and managers and 5 percent of CEOs. Women of color represent only 4.7 percent of executive and senior-level roles.

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in conclusion


Sniffing Out Strong Leaders

Unleash your development efforts By Krissi Barr

Headshot of Krissi Barr
Krissi Barr is a keynote speaker, executive coach, strategic planner and co-author of “The Fido Factor.” She can be reached at editor@CLOmedia.com.
T

he leadership wisdom of dogs. Those are five words most chief learning officers likely never thought they’d see in a professional setting. Don’t worry, your career hasn’t gone to the dogs — just your inspiration for leadership development.

That’s because great leaders — and great dogs — share some of the same traits.

  • Faithful leaders earn loyalty by wearing their positive emotions front and center, and doing what they say they’re going to do when they say they’ll do it.
  • Inspirational leaders move people to do the extraordinary with their optimism and passion.
  • Determined leaders focus on what matters most, shake off setbacks and keep moving toward their goals.
  • Observant leaders spot problems and opportunities sooner by sensing things other people miss.

Thanks for reading our April 2019 issue!

Thanks for reading our April 2019 issue!