December 2018

December 2018

Sponsored Content


6 Ways Companies Can Support Degree Completion for Employees

Many colleges and universities are struggling with improving persistence and completion rates for students. But what can companies that support education for their workforce do to impact completion?

M

any colleges and universities are struggling with improving persistence and completion rates for students. But what can companies that support education for their workforce do to impact completion? They can make progress toward a degree a cornerstone of company culture, says Jaime Fall, Director of Upskill America at the Aspen Institute, an employer-led organization focused on opportunity for American workers.

On the one hand, many companies invest heavily in tuition assistance programs because they can deliver a strong return on investment. For example, an analysis of the education reimbursement program of health insurance company Cigna showed that every dollar the company spends on the program generates a $1.29 savings, according to a study by the Lumina Foundation.

Sponsored Content


Data Shows More Jobs Need Tech Skills: Here’s How to Keep Up

Technology is changing the way we do nearly every job, from manual labor to healthcare to law enforcement. But the occupations that are changing most rapidly aren’t necessarily the ones you’d think.

W

e’ve written before about how technology is changing what skills are required for many jobs, particularly in frontline positions like customer service. With headline-grabbing innovations in artificial intelligence and automation, it’s no wonder these types of jobs are dominating conversations about talent development.

In fact, technology is changing the way we do nearly every job, from manual labor to healthcare to law enforcement. But which occupations are changing most rapidly? Not necessarily the ones you’d think.

Editor’s Letter


Business Is Learning

D

on’t take this wrong but you’re not doing it right. It’s not the outcomes of what you do that are most important. It’s the process.

Now before we go too far, I am not saying corporate learning should ignore the business outcomes of what you do. I’m all for a healthy and growing bottom line. You don’t have a job if what you do doesn’t help your organization in some meaningful way. I don’t have a job if you don’t have a job.

So by all means, continue to collect data on learning’s effect on sales growth, cost savings and risk aversion. Make clear the link between the development of people and more engaged workers and higher workforce productivity. Perform sophisticated statistical modeling, use a regression analysis and continue to do all the things a modern data-driven business function should be expected to do.

December 2018 | Volume 17, Issue 10

on the cover: Photo by Brian Flaherty

10


Electronic Arts’ Brad Margolis on his career journey; Allison Horn of Accenture talks social physics; and quick hits on what you’re using and reading.

32


2018 CLO of the Year

Ave Rio
The 16th CLO of the Year is leading EY into the future with purposeful design and calculated measurement.

56


Case Study

Sarah Fister Gale
The city of Wichita, Kansas, is attracting talent from across the nation through its Wichita Promise MOVE program.

58


Business Intelligence

Mike Prokopeak
Plans for the coming year indicate CLOs are feeling good about the road ahead.

Features

24
Joseph Santana
Employee resource groups: a valuable, overlooked leadership gem.
30
Ashley St. John
This year’s winners demonstrated excellence in the design and delivery of learning.
34
CLO Staff
Learning leaders who have exhibited excellence in the design and delivery of employee development programs.
48
CLO Staff
Learning providers and vendor companies that have delivered highly impactful learning.

Experts

16
Michael E. Echols
We Are Underinvesting in Human Capital
18
Josh Bersin
A Whole New World (of Learning)
20
Jack J. Phillips & Patti P. Phillips
A Legend’s Look at Learning
22
David DeFilippo
Putting Into Practice What We Preach
62
Adrian Gostick and Chester Elton
Impact and Learning Span the Generations

Resources

4
Business Is Learning

Are you a part of the CLO Network?

Your Career


Your Career


Career Advice From

Brad Margolis

senior director of executive development and organization effectiveness, electronic arts

Brad Margolis, senior director of executive development and organization effectiveness at Electronic Arts, shares his career journey and how he came into L&D.
This transcript has been edited for space and clarity.

How did you get into learning and development?

I was always interested in three things: people, creativity and problem solving. I came out of school with a degree in business and a degree in computer science. That was mostly my father’s influence, saying, “Get a degree in computer science and you’ll have a job.” And then I was working in Philadelphia for a tech firm, and the blizzard in ’96 happened. There was six feet of snow on my car, and then the backhoe came and put six more feet of snow on my car. I thought, I’m done. I’ve just got to go west. I moved to San Francisco and started exploring options and was still in technology. I moved from tech and did project management, then program management to marketing. I spent three years in marketing and was still trying to find the right combo of people, creativity and problem solving.

Practical Applications

Asana
Asana is a team collaboration tool. This intuitive web-based tool (mobile app is available) keeps teams organized without needing to rely on email. Simply create a project, add as many tasks that relate to the project and assign the tasks to one or more team members. Handy alerts notify you when your tasks are due or overdue, and you can follow the progress of tasks and projects even if you’re not specifically responsible for the deliverable. You can post supporting files and give people a “like” when they complete a task. If email is where knowledge goes to die, Asana is where knowledge thrives.
Pam Boiros, founder of Bridge Marketing Advisors and learning adviser at Training Orchestra

Your Career


Your Career


What Are You Reading?

Help Them Grow or Watch Them Go: Career Conversations Employees Want

By Julie Winkle Giulioni and Beverly L. Kaye

I’m reading this book because I coach leaders and managers, many of who find it challenging to have semi-annual reviews and get a little lost in long conversations around career development. This book breaks down those conversations and touch points into bite-size conversations spread throughout the year, so they are not as intimidating to the leader or the employee. I’m loving how small, bite-size conversations can support front-line managers to help their reports have conversations that matter without intimidating either of them and making it easy to do often.

Your Career


Your Career


Top of Mind

Experimenting with Social Physics By Allison Horn

Allison Horn is the managing director of learning and leadership development at Accenture, which serves more than 425,000 employees in 120 countries and 40 industries. Accenture was the first-place winner of the 2018 Chief Learning Officer LearningElite program.

W e experiment a lot at Accenture. Some experiments are more successful than others, but we learn something new from each. Usually we write about the more successful experiments, offering lessons learned and recommended paths forward. But here, I’d like to share a nascent, not yet tested idea: applying “social physics” to our learning and leadership development programs.

What Is Social Physics?

MIT professor Alex “Sandy” Pentland, often called the father of social physics, defines social physics in his 2015 book, “Social Physics: How Social Networks Can Make Us Smarter,” as “a quantitative social science that describes reliable, mathematical connections between information and idea flow on the one hand and people’s behavior on the other.” He’s used social physics to forecast productivity of small groups, corporate departments and even entire cities with this fundamental thesis: Because we are impacted by those we physically interact with as individuals, teams and societies, we can change outcomes by changing patterns of interaction.

BUSINESS IMPACT


We Are Underinvesting in Human Capital

Despite underinvestment, L&D is more important than ever By Michael E. Echols

Michael E. Echols is principal and founder of Human Capital LLC and author of “Your Future Is Calling.”
He can be reached at editor@CLOmedia.com.

R

apid changes are impacting virtually every aspect of business. Learning and development is no exception. Here I’ll examine new data and explore implications for corporate L&D investment.

At the macro level, two unprecedented developments have occurred in the past year. The first is the relationship between unemployed workers and unfilled jobs. In 2018, for the first time in U.S. history, the number of unfilled positions in the United States economy was greater than the number of unemployed individuals seeking employment. As of June 2018, there were 6.66 million unfilled jobs while there were 6.58 million individuals seeking employment. The gross numbers are sufficiently grim but an even greater problem lurks beneath the surface. There is strong evidence that many of the unemployed lack the skills and experience required to meet the specifications of the unfilled jobs. L&D is more important than ever.

BEST PRACTICES


A Whole New World (of Learning)

The end of the LMS as we know it is coming By Josh Bersin

Josh Bersin is an industry analyst and founder of Bersin by Deloitte.
He can be reached at editor@CLOmedia.com.

W

hen I began my career as an analyst, I started out studying the LMS market. At that time (early 2000s), learning management systems were an innovative new business application that helped companies build and manage e-learning and track and organize all forms of training. These systems were actually the first practical employee-centric portals.

Fast forward to today. Now we carry around smartphones, watch videos and live streams from a wide range of sources, and communicate through multiple social media channels. We’re all used to nudges, AI-based suggestions and a steady stream of messages coming our way throughout the day.

This change in the way we interact with information has made the original LMS paradigm, that of a portal-based online university, increasingly obsolete.

ACCOUNTABILITY


A Legend’s Look at Learning

Let’s view training as an investment versus a cost BY JACK J. PHILLIPS AND PATTI P. PHILLIPS

Jack J. Phillips is the chairman and Patti P. Phillips is president and CEO of the ROI Institute.
They can be reached at editor@CLOmedia.com.

F

or almost four decades, Tom Peters has been preaching the gospel of putting people first, a message more urgent than ever in today’s rapidly changing business environment. Peters is a leading business management guru and the best-selling author of 16 books, including “In Search of Excellence,” co-authored with Robert H. Waterman Jr., which is often cited among the best business books written with more than six million copies sold.

Peters has condensed his years of teaching and consulting into a new book titled “The Excellence Dividend: Meeting the Tech Tide with Work That Wows and Jobs That Last.” A chapter is devoted to the importance of training. Peters prefers the word training instead of learning, development and preparation. His advice is particularly important as he has spent much time in the past four decades with top executives.

In this chapter, Peters underscores the importance of training and its role in an organization. He reminds us that training is critical and investments in training should be significant. For example, training investments are huge in military organizations, fire departments and police departments, where lives are at stake. In the Army, he points out, three-star generals obsess about training, while in most businesses, it’s a midlevel staff function. Sports teams, theater groups and ballet companies also focus extensively on training, he adds.

ON THE FRONT LINE


Putting Into Practice What We Preach

As leaders, we need to do what we say BY DAVID DeFILIPPO

David DeFilippo is chief people and learning officer for Suffolk.
He can be reached at editor@CLOmedia.com.

I

n the practice of leadership and among firms there have been many books and much talk about various leadership styles, including authentic, collaborative or even inspirational leadership to name a few. All these make sense and have value as frameworks to define and develop one’s leadership approach, so I am going to introduce a simple and practical way that I think about leadership. Simply put, are we really doing what we say?

In their seminal 1974 book “Theory in Practice: Increasing Professional Effectiveness,” Chris Argyris and Donald Schön define this relationship as “theories of action” comprised of two components: espoused theory and theory-in-use. Essentially, their work affirms that espoused theory is the belief one’s intended behavior is based on, while theory-in-use is the actual action employed. In both cases the litmus test of effectiveness is evaluated based on the achievement of the desired outcomes. Since there is potential for incongruence between one’s espoused theory and theory-in-use, raising one’s self-awareness to bridge this potential gap is key to efficacy and self-correction.

By Joseph Santana

Employee resource groups: A valuable, overlooked leadership development gem waiting to be mined.

The need for leaders at all levels in organizations continues to grow as the business ecosystem becomes more complex and competitive due in part to globalization, emerging technologies and an acceleration in the speed of disruption. On top of this, a growing number of baby boomer leaders are leaving their companies to pursue other noncorporate business or personal interests. So it’s not surprising that a 2014 Deloitte University Press survey of global organizations revealed that 86 percent of participating companies said having more effective leaders at all levels was their No. 1 business issue.

Unfortunately, according to the same study, despite investing about $14 billion in leadership development, only 8 percent of these companies felt they had a good leadership development process. This low percentage represents a huge gap in an area where organizations are spending so much money and focusing so much energy.

By Joseph Santana

Employee resource groups: A valuable, overlooked leadership development gem waiting to be mined.

The need for leaders at all levels in organizations continues to grow as the business ecosystem becomes more complex and competitive due in part to globalization, emerging technologies and an acceleration in the speed of disruption. On top of this, a growing number of baby boomer leaders are leaving their companies to pursue other noncorporate business or personal interests. So it’s not surprising that a 2014 Deloitte University Press survey of global organizations revealed that 86 percent of participating companies said having more effective leaders at all levels was their No. 1 business issue.

Unfortunately, according to the same study, despite investing about $14 billion in leadership development, only 8 percent of these companies felt they had a good leadership development process. This low percentage represents a huge gap in an area where organizations are spending so much money and focusing so much energy.

Is your culture innovation capable?

Embedding innovation within work cultures leads to organizational success

By Tim Harnett

Business transformation has been a long time coming for every industry, challenging organizations that grew and matured in a more analog society. With consumers living digital lives, Andrew Webster, vice president of transformation for ExperiencePoint, believes traditional approaches can no longer deliver what consumers want and need. “As conditions and expectations change at an unprecedented pace, organizations and employees require new ways of thinking and tackling more and more complex business challenges,” Webster says.

One new approach involves realigning work cultures to be more receptive to innovation. These cultures are more capable of addressing any predictable or emerging challenges organizations face. “Many organizations currently draw against the bank of previously used solutions,” Webster says. “But solutions that may have worked in the past might not solve today’s challenges. As organizational complexity increases, you need fresh, new thinking, or you’ll be vulnerable to the future instead of being poised to grow with it. In truly complex environments, where there are no right or wrong answers, we’re a little less equipped to approach things with creativity, and that needs to change.”

The road to excellence is often long and fraught with obstacles and lessons. Achieving excellence in anything requires perseverance and diligence. To borrow the wise words of Aristotle, “Excellence is never an accident. It is always the result of high intention, sincere effort and intelligent execution; it represents the wise choice of many alternatives — choice, not chance, determines your destiny.”

This year marked the 16th anniversary of Chief Learning Officer’s Learning In Practice Awards, a recognition program to honor learning industry leaders who have demonstrated excellence in the design and delivery of employee development programs through a combination of qualities such as leadership, vision, business acumen and strategic alignment. Judges selected the nearly 70 winners from almost 200 submitted nominations. The winners were honored at a special reception during the 2018 CLO Fall Symposium held Sept. 30 to Oct. 2 in Houston.

Practitioners received awards across eight categories in two divisions: Division 1 for companies with 10,000 employees or more and Division 2 for companies with less than 10,000 employees. Categories included Business Impact, Innovation and Technology, to name a few, as well as the industry’s top honor, CLO of the Year. Learning providers and vendor companies were also recognized for their excellence in eight categories, including academic partnerships, blended learning, e-learning and more.

This year’s winners included executives from across the United States, as well as international finalists from as far as Canada, England, India, the Netherlands, Spain and Switzerland.

Congratulations to this year’s winners for the pursuit and achievement of excellence in the design and delivery of learning! Nominations for the 2019 Learning In Practice Awards will open in April.

PRACTITIONER AWARDS

CLO of the Year: For the learning executive who is without peer in developing and executing learning and development strategies, marshaling and managing resources, and achieving measurable success. The CLO of the Year award recognizes executives for their body of work over the course of their career.

Business Impact: For learning executives who have implemented a significant measurement or evaluation program that has demonstrated exceptional business impact from their workforce development programs. Potential results may include measures of employee retention, sales, revenue growth, customer satisfaction or cost reduction, among others.

Business Partnership: For learning departments that have partnered in a progressive way with business partners or external organizational divisions and functions such as the sales and marketing department or external customer groups to develop and deliver a targeted employee development program that supports the partner’s goals.

Innovation: For learning executives who have marshaled resources and applied innovative practices, processes and/or technologies in a new and groundbreaking way to address a significant business or organizational opportunity.

Strategy: For learning executives who have demonstrated exceptional business acumen combined with forward-looking vision to develop and execute a comprehensive learning strategy that clearly aligns employee development with broader organizational strategy.

Talent Management: For learning executives who have developed a program that effectively integrates learning into broader talent management initiatives such as employee engagement, onboarding, succession planning, recruiting or performance management.

Technology: For learning executives who have delivered new and unique applications of emerging technology to employee learning and development.

Trailblazer: For learning executives who have either launched a new enterprise learning function or completely overhauled existing workforce development initiatives in the past year.

PROVIDER AWARDS

Excellence in Academic Partnerships: Recognizes accredited academic learning institutions that have partnered with an organization in the past year to develop skills, competency or knowledge in a general employee population.

Excellence in Blended Learning: Recognizes vendors that have deployed a variety of tools in support of a client’s learning program that delivers engaging learning combining multiple modalities.

Excellence in Community Service: Recognizes vendors that have provided significant investment of company resources and time in support of a community service project or initiative.

Excellence in Content: Recognizes vendors that have created superior customized and/or off-the-shelf learning content.

Excellence in E-Learning: Recognizes vendors that have rolled out an innovative and effective e-learning program or suite for a client.

Excellence in Executive Education: Recognizes executive education providers that have delivered a targeted executive education program for a client that has delivered measurable results.

Excellence in Technology Innovation: Recognizes vendors that have rolled out an innovative learning technology for a client such as machine learning, artificial intelligence, apps, video, social collaboration tools or games and simulations.

Excellence in Partnership: Recognizes vendors or consultants that have effectively supported a client’s learning and development function to set strategy or establish or implement a program via consulting or whole or partial outsources services.

The road to excellence is often long and fraught with obstacles and lessons. Achieving excellence in anything requires perseverance and diligence. To borrow the wise words of Aristotle, “Excellence is never an accident. It is always the result of high intention, sincere effort and intelligent execution; it represents the wise choice of many alternatives — choice, not chance, determines your destiny.”

This year marked the 16th anniversary of Chief Learning Officer’s Learning In Practice Awards, a recognition program to honor learning industry leaders who have demonstrated excellence in the design and delivery of employee development programs through a combination of qualities such as leadership, vision, business acumen and strategic alignment. Judges selected the nearly 70 winners from almost 200 submitted nominations. The winners were honored at a special reception during the 2018 CLO Fall Symposium held Sept. 30 to Oct. 2 in Houston.

Practitioners received awards across eight categories in two divisions: Division 1 for companies with 10,000 employees or more and Division 2 for companies with less than 10,000 employees. Categories included Business Impact, Innovation and Technology, to name a few, as well as the industry’s top honor, CLO of the Year. Learning providers and vendor companies were also recognized for their excellence in eight categories, including academic partnerships, blended learning, e-learning and more.

This year’s winners included executives from across the United States, as well as international finalists from as far as Canada, England, India, the Netherlands, Spain and Switzerland.

Congratulations to this year’s winners for the pursuit and achievement of excellence in the design and delivery of learning! Nominations for the 2019 Learning In Practice Awards will open in April.

PRACTITIONER AWARDS

CLO of the Year: For the learning executive who is without peer in developing and executing learning and development strategies, marshaling and managing resources, and achieving measurable success. The CLO of the Year award recognizes executives for their body of work over the course of their career.

Business Impact: For learning executives who have implemented a significant measurement or evaluation program that has demonstrated exceptional business impact from their workforce development programs. Potential results may include measures of employee retention, sales, revenue growth, customer satisfaction or cost reduction, among others.

Business Partnership: For learning departments that have partnered in a progressive way with business partners or external organizational divisions and functions such as the sales and marketing department or external customer groups to develop and deliver a targeted employee development program that supports the partner’s goals.

Innovation: For learning executives who have marshaled resources and applied innovative practices, processes and/or technologies in a new and groundbreaking way to address a significant business or organizational opportunity.

Strategy: For learning executives who have demonstrated exceptional business acumen combined with forward-looking vision to develop and execute a comprehensive learning strategy that clearly aligns employee development with broader organizational strategy.

Talent Management: For learning executives who have developed a program that effectively integrates learning into broader talent management initiatives such as employee engagement, onboarding, succession planning, recruiting or performance management.

Technology: For learning executives who have delivered new and unique applications of emerging technology to employee learning and development.

Trailblazer: For learning executives who have either launched a new enterprise learning function or completely overhauled existing workforce development initiatives in the past year.

PROVIDER AWARDS

Excellence in Academic Partnerships: Recognizes accredited academic learning institutions that have partnered with an organization in the past year to develop skills, competency or knowledge in a general employee population.

Excellence in Blended Learning: Recognizes vendors that have deployed a variety of tools in support of a client’s learning program that delivers engaging learning combining multiple modalities.

Excellence in Community Service: Recognizes vendors that have provided significant investment of company resources and time in support of a community service project or initiative.

Excellence in Content: Recognizes vendors that have created superior customized and/or off-the-shelf learning content.

Excellence in E-Learning: Recognizes vendors that have rolled out an innovative and effective e-learning program or suite for a client.

Excellence in Executive Education: Recognizes executive education providers that have delivered a targeted executive education program for a client that has delivered measurable results.

Excellence in Technology Innovation: Recognizes vendors that have rolled out an innovative learning technology for a client such as machine learning, artificial intelligence, apps, video, social collaboration tools or games and simulations.

Excellence in Partnership: Recognizes vendors or consultants that have effectively supported a client’s learning and development function to set strategy or establish or implement a program via consulting or whole or partial outsources services.

Brenda Sugrue Is the 2018 CLO of the Year

Treating learning as a science and a business has Brenda Sugrue and EY looking forward to 2020.

By Ave Rio

An elementary school teacher, a university professor, a company owner, an industry researcher and now an award-winning corporate learning leader, Brenda Sugrue has spent her career in learning. She says working in so many roles has allowed her to identify principles to guide the development and delivery of effective learning regardless of audience, content or context. She said those principles are the anchor from which she makes decisions in her role as global chief learning officer for EY, a $35 billion professional services organization with more than 260,000 people worldwide.

In her first few months as EY’s CLO, Sugrue presented her vision for learning at the company: to increase the alignment, effectiveness and brand of learning at EY. This strategy accelerated the development of the skills needed to achieve the company’s Vision 2020 plan, which aims to make EY the leading global professional services organization by 2020.

“I am very interested in the science of learning and how to apply it at scale to engineer effective and efficient learning experiences,” Sugrue said. “The more we know about how the mind works and the best ways to build expertise, the more confident and successful we will be in designing systems and content to develop knowledge and skills in any audience.”

Read Full Article

BUSINESS IMPACT
DIV. 1

Chris Bower

Global Director, GM Center of Learning

When General Motors’ Chevrolet brand marketing team faced the challenge of preparing its sales force for the launch of seven new vehicles in 2017, it teamed up with GM’s Center of Learning and GP Strategies to brainstorm a ride-and-drive event that would provide hands-on training in an “experiential way.” In a highly competitive market, providing educational and motivational training is key to preparing sales consultants to discuss and compare the product to its competitors.

With that in mind, the team, led by Chris Bower, collaborated to come up with “Find New Roads Tour,” a five-city tour developed to create an exciting experiment around the new products and provide insights to share with their dealerships. The team began by analyzing the overarching learning strategy for all new product launches developed by the Center of Learning two years ago, including gaining awareness, building knowledge, putting into practice and accessing the details. The final design included three major components: hands-on driving experiences, interactive learning labs and the Possibilities Pavilion.

To enroll in the event, salespeople were able to view a video via an enrollment website and then register to sign up. Those enrolled were provided hotel and travel information as well as agendas for the dealer and sales consultant events. The events included 50 staff, 130 vehicles, tires, tents and more, with limited downtime, but paid off: More than 6,500 dealer managers and sale consultants attended.

Chevrolet has since seen the success of the event, with monthly unit sales gains of 1.9 percent in the four months following the tour (compared to the 0.3 percent gain to those who did not attend), totaling $49 million in gross profits to GM.

— Brooke Pawling

▲ Brenda Sugrue

Global Chief Learning Officer, EY

London-based EY was in need of a new strategy initiative to help reach their goal of becoming the leading global professional services organization. With a lack of comprehensible and accessible data, the strategy initiative created four years ago had to get an upgrade to meet the company’s goal of increasing market share, brand and revenue and enabling the organization to continue thriving.

Brenda Sugrue stepped in to help develop a measurement strategy that included a new program evaluation framework and methodology. The framework’s elements were developed in consultation with a firm specializing in measuring the business impact of learning, and included business alignment, readiness, quality and consumption, according to the company application. Within this framework were four phases — satisfaction, learning, application and business impact — where a qualitative and quantitative study was conducted to extract accurate data on program participants.

With 50,000 employees impacted by this specific initiative, EY has outperformed external benchmarks and experienced an increased win rate by 22 points.

— Brooke Pawling

Excellence in
Academic Partnerships

▲ Davenport University

Research conducted by direct sales business Amway in 2008 revealed a significant gap in development opportunities for midlevel and functional leaders who wanted to improve their leadership knowledge and skills. Amway identified five areas that servant leaders would need to master: difficult interactions, engagement and influence, global collaboration, innovation and creativity, and the ability to lead people. Then it searched for an outside team to serve as a partner in developing, organizing and implementing a leadership development certification program that could deliver these skillsets. Davenport University, with its Institute for Professional Excellence, was the answer.

Together, Davenport University and Amway designed the Amway Leadership Certification Program, which blends self-guided instruction, discussion-based learning and live engagement. An annual program, the ALCP lasts for seven months and requires about two to three hours of self-paced work per week. Instructors include members of Davenport University MBA faculty and Amway experts and leaders. Amway facilitates learning on key concepts of corporate leadership philosophy. Davenport faculty teaches the five key people-leadership topics using a four-week learning cycle for each, called the FLARE cycle — Fuel, Learn, Apply, Reflect, Evaluate.

Throughout the program’s 10 years, 665 participants have come from all regions in which Amway operates, with leaders joining the program from 21 countries. In 2017, of the 76 program participants, 92 percent passed the program and received academic credit and 83 percent passed with excellence and were on the program’s honor roll. Amway research shows 98 percent of participants report that the program has had a positive impact on their leadership performance.

— Ashley St. John

▲ Penn State Smeal College of Business / Penn State Executive Programs / CorpU

In 2015, Agilent Technologies Inc., a public company focused on life sciences, diagnostics and applied chemical markets, spun off its electronic measurement business to focus exclusively on life science technologies. To ensure the success of this new direction, Agilent CEO Mike McMullen launched a massive restructuring to make the company more efficient, nimble and customer-focused.

Agilent supply chain teams that had been supporting individual product lines were consolidated into a global organization that required tight alignment of purpose, capabilities and best practices. Agilent engaged Penn State’s Smeal College of Business and CorpU, which partnered in 2015 to launch the Supply Chain Leadership Academy, a program that helps supply chain leaders of tomorrow apply leadership concepts and best practices in supply chain management.

The SCLA program for Agilent was renamed OFS Supply Chain Program and used a two-prong approach that involved strategy sprints for department heads and managers and secondary learning sprints for a broader range of employees.

As a result of the program, Agilent saw a reduced time for its strategy rollout for 150 leaders from four months to nine days. Ninety-two percent of manufacturing and supply chain employees confirmed understanding how their work contributed to strategy and how their organization contributed to company success, and 91 percent understood how the strategy supports customers’ needs, according to survey results.

— Ashley St. John

Case Study


Welcome to Wichita

BY SARAH FISTER GALE

Snapshot

The city of Wichita, Kansas, through its Wichita Promise MOVE program, is attracting talent from across the nation to fill its industry talent gap.

W

ichita, Kansas, is best known for being a center of aviation manufacturing. The city, which refers to itself as the “Air Capital of the World,” is home to multiple major aircraft companies and industry suppliers, including Textron Aviation, Spirit AeroSystems Holdings and Airbus Americas Engineering. But what the city is increasingly short of is talent to work at these companies.

“It’s a constant struggle for Wichita,” said Sheree Utash, president of Wichita State University Tech. “There are a lot of job openings and not enough talent. We need a bigger pipeline to fill these jobs.”

It’s an ongoing problem that city leaders have attempted to address through high school training programs, internship opportunities and scholarships to local students. But none of these programs have made a big enough impact.

Business Intelligence


Reason for Optimism

Plans for the coming year indicate CLOs are feeling good about the road ahead.

By Mike Prokopeak

C

hief learning officers tend to be an optimistic bunch. So it’s not surprising their expectations for the future often come with a rosy tint. With intervention, bad outcomes can be turned to good. A struggling worker can be transformed into a high performer.

The same sunny disposition holds true for their outlook on learning and development in 2019.

According to a survey of the Chief Learning Officer Business Intelligence Board, a majority (65 percent) of CLOs say their outlook for 2019 is more optimistic than 2018, with 26 percent saying their outlook is the same and 10 percent less optimistic (Figure 1).

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in conclusion


Impact and Learning Span the Generations

Today’s best teams share these common motivators By Chester Elton and Adrian Gostick

Chester Elton and Adrian Gostick are The New York Times best-selling authors of “The Best Team Wins,” “All In” and “The Carrot Principle.” They can be reached at editor@CLOmedia.comeditor@CLOmedia.com.

W

e are smack-dab in the middle of a massive shift toward more teamwork in the workplace. In the average company, up to 80 percent of employees’ days are spent working collaboratively, and yet only 14 percent of leaders are satisfied with their ability to collaborate and make decisions as teams.

Sounds like an opportunity for L&D.

Let’s face it: Leading a team has never been harder. We have five generations at work, many of whom are global, remote or gig employees. We are told to break down silos and work cross-functionally, but no one has taught us how. We used to have a year to bring a new employee up to speed; now we have weeks. And so on. That’s why, in writing “The Best Team Wins,” we drew on our surveys of more than 850,000 people to identify the traits of today’s most successful team leaders — those who are facing and overcoming these obstacles.

Included in our data are 50,000 people who have completed our Motivators Assessment, a 100-question test that ranks human motivators (out of 23 possible choices) from the strongest to weakest. As our research team sorted through this database, one of the most striking findings was that the most common top two motivators are the same across all generations in the workplace today: (1) impact and (2) learning.

Thanks for reading our December 2018 issue!