Chief Learning Officer
December 2019

Editor’s Letter


Uncertainty as Opportunity
Mike Prokopeak
T

he three most powerful words in education are “I don’t know.”

They’re also the most terrifying. Those three simple words conjure up that helpless feeling you get when your freshman algebra teacher calls your name while you’re idly daydreaming of yourself as Magnum, P.I., zooming down a sun-drenched Hawaii highway behind the wheel of a cherry red Ferrari 308 GTS after another successful caper with your best buds T.C. and Rick. Oh, that was just me?

For many, not having the answer is shameful. It means we aren’t paying enough attention or didn’t study hard enough. Worst of all, it may feel as though we’re incapable of learning and too stupid to get it right.

DECEMBER 2019 | Volume 18, Issue 10

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CLO Contents December 2019 typography top
Defense Acquisition University's Jim Woolsey table of contents
Defense Acquisition University's Jim Woolsey table of contents
on the cover: Photo by Jeff Millies
10
Dorie Blesoff of Relativity shares her career journey; DAU’s Marina Theodotou reflects on the Chief Learning Officer Fall Symposium; and people share what they’re reading.
32
2019 CLO of the Year
Elizabeth Loutfi
Throughout his career, Jim Woolsey has focused on progress and moving forward. As president of DAU, he’s continuing this tradition.
56

Case Study

Sarah Fister Gale
Through its Learn.Develop.Perform global program, AbbVie has transformed its learning culture.
58

Business Intelligence

Ashley St. John
CLOs express a positive outlook going into the new year.
CLO Contents December 2019 typography
Practitioner Award Winners table of contents
Provider Award Winners table of contents
Embrace Design Thinking to Advance Diversity, Equity and Inclusion table of contents

Features

20
Donald Fan
Double down on the right problem to yield twice the result with half the effort.
30
Ashley St. John
This year’s winners demonstrated leadership, vision, business acumen and strategic alignment.
34
CLO Staff
Learning leaders who have exhibited excellence in the design and delivery of employee development programs.
48
CLO Staff
Learning providers and vendor companies that have delivered highly impactful learning.

Experts

14
Rosina L. Racioppi
Let’s Start at the Very Beginning
15
Lee Maxey
Reining in Efficiency for the Greater Good
16
Josh Bersin
How Will Content Discovery Evolve?
18
Jack J. & Patti P. Phillips
Black Boxes and Talent Development
62
Todd Maddox
Scenario-Based Microlearning for Soft Skills

Resources

4
Uncertainty as Opportunity
Your Career


Your Career


Career Advice From

Dorie Blesoff

chief people officer, Relativity

Dorie Blesoff, chief people officer at Relativity, answers our questions about her career and the time she’s spent in L&D.
Dorie BlesoffHow did you start your career in learning?

My career did not move into the learning field until I realized in my late 30s that I had a passion for working with organizations moving through and adapting to change — and that learning was instrumental to that. I decided to shift my career focus and went back to school for a master’s in organizational development as I also explored jobs within the learning and development field. At the time, the entry-​level job that made the most sense in the field was in HR’s training and development function. Since then, I’ve held roles in organizational development and strategic HR, which often included creating programs for leadership development or building out corporate learning programs. I also have been fortunate to serve as adjunct faculty since 1996 at Northwestern University’s undergraduate and graduate learning and organizational change degree programs as part of my continued growth. Now I’ve seen how a learning career can evolve. Prior to my role as chief people officer at Relativity, I was a strategic HR consultant there focused on establishing a foundation for workforce and leadership development, which was a long-term investment leaders saw as critical.

The most important part of learning is:
Being open to adjusting your mental model.
Circle graph and Bar Graph
Circle graph and Bar Graph
The most overrated trend in L&D is:
The belief that personalized, tech-based learning will replace the collective, live learning community.
Your Career


Your Career


What Are You Reading?
Successful Women Think Differently: 9 Habits to Make You Happier, Healthier, and More Resilient
Successful Women Think Differently: 9 Habits to Make You Happier, Healthier, and More Resilient
By Valorie Burton
It is more of a coaching positive psychology book. It causes you to examine the excuses we make for ourselves and why we don’t achieve our goals we have set for ourselves, then points us in the right direction to achieve them in small chunks. Any book by Valorie Burton I have found to be inspiring, motivational and certainly achievable. Listening to her podcast, “Positively Psyched,” her three-minute YouTube video and reading her book has inspired me to pursue a coaching certification next spring.
Your Career


Your Career


Top of Mind
Are you ready for 2020? By Marina Theodotou
Reflections from Marina Theodotou, director of operations and analytics, Defense Acquisition University.
Marina Theodotou
Marina Theodotou
This past October, I attended Chief Learning Officer’s Fall 2019 Symposium in Chicago. If you weren’t able to be there, I’d like to share 10 practices I gleaned from chief learning officers and thought leaders at the conference for you and your team to consider as you plan for 2020 and the continuing onslaught of change.

Use the agile process to develop learning assets. Accenture CLO Allison Horn discussed in detail how using the agile scrum process has accelerated the delivery time and quality of learning assets.

Growing Diverse Talent


Let’s Start at the Very Beginning
A very good place to start By Rosina L. Racioppi
Rosina L. Racioppi

Rosina L. Racioppi is president and CEO of Women Unlimited Inc.

M

ore and more research highlights the enduring benefits to both women and their organizations of developing female talent early. Leadership development at the start of a woman’s career is proving to be a major contributor to greater numbers of women reaching the C-suite.

A recent KPMG study of more than 3,000 women found that early development of leadership skills boosted women’s confidence and competence. Eighty percent of respondents to the study believe that the most important time to support a woman’s career development is in her 20s.

In my years working with major organizations, I’ve found that budgets for female talent development are mostly allocated to the midcareer level. No doubt, it’s needed and warranted because that’s where organizations see a large drain of female talent. However, the need to start earlier is undeniable. As the KPMG study shows, by midcareer, women have formulated points of view about themselves and their organizations that are often hard to undo.

making the grade


Reining in Efficiency for the Greater Good
A healthy pursuit has become an obsession By Lee Maxey
Lee Maxey Headshot

Lee Maxey is CEO of MindMax, a marketing and enrollment management services company.

D

avid Elkind writes in his book “The Hurried Child” that society is increasingly rushing children and students through life in the name of achievement and efficiency. Pushing oneself beyond what’s comfortable to grow physically, emotionally and spiritually is valuable. But we’re seeing signs of what happens when a healthy pursuit becomes an obsession.

“I’ve inflicted more damage than I could’ve ever imagined,” said actress Felicity Huffman in early September as a judge prepared to sentence her to federal prison for paying $15,000 to have SAT scores corrected for her 19-year-old daughter. The conviction is the first of what will likely be more such decisions in the college admissions scandal. There’s no way to know for sure what motivated Huffman. But there’s an argument to be made that greed and impatience played a starring role. Perhaps with a warped sense of efficiency in mind, Huffman was too impatient to let her daughter find her own way. So she took the reins and bought the score she decided her daughter deserved, maybe thinking it would ultimately bring happiness.

best practices


How Will Content Discovery Evolve?
The challenge of guiding learning By Josh Bersin
Josh Bersin Headshot

Josh Bersin is an industry analyst and founder of Bersin by Deloitte.

I

t’s more important than ever to think about how employees will find the content they need. This is how the learning experience platform market came to be.

I want to give you a sense of how complex this challenge has become. Google has thousands of engineers optimizing search. LXP companies, which may have 10 engineers at most working on this, have to make some choices. Let’s examine our options for guiding learning.

By far the simplest and most useful way to help employees find what they need is to provide them with a learning path. The focus on self-directed learning has gone too far — most of us simply do not know what we need to know. I also believe the LXP market has gotten way ahead of itself. We now have companies building “flea markets” of learning content, making it harder than ever for employees to decide what to learn. But if you take the time to study the domain, you can build or buy a curriculum, learning path or certification program that gets people to where they need to be.

accountability


Black Boxes and Talent Development
Design for success and measure it along the journey By Jack J. Phillips and Patti P. Phillips
Jack J. Phillips Headshot
Patti P. Phillips Headshot

Jack J. Phillips is the chairman and Patti P. Phillips is president and CEO of the ROI Institute.

A

irline travel is the safest transportation system in the world and being in an airplane is one of the safest places you can be. You are a hundred times more likely to be struck by lightning on a golf course than killed in an airplane crash.

How did it get this way? It happened through the concept of black box thinking. Each airplane has two black boxes, one for systems recording and the other for voice recording. When a plane crashes, these boxes usually identify the cause of the crash. The analysis of data results in changes in design, procedures, processes or training. Black box analysis is required by regulations and standards and is enforced globally.

Mathew Syed, in his book “Black Box Thinking: Why Most People Never Learn From Their Mistakes — But Some Do,” argues that black box thinking should permeate the health care industry. With dramatic examples, Syed describes the dire state of today’s health care situation, where errors in the system kill thousands of people every month. This book has prompted many discussions and inspired some action, but, due to resistance, little progress has been made in the health care industry.

Scott Shackleford’s June 5 article in The Wall Street Journal, “We Need an NTSB for Cyberattacks,” suggested that black box thinking should also be brought into the cybersecurity industry. Shackleford asserts that when there is a cybersecurity breach, it must be investigated, and that investigation should lead to legal and regulatory changes, dramatically reducing the number of cyberattacks. Currently, when an attack occurs, the organization will investigate and adjust, but rarely do these events prompt industrywide changes.

By Donald Fan
Despite best intentions, our diversity, equity and inclusion efforts often fail. Let’s consider two questions: How can we challenge the thinking and assumptions in DEI from past decades to redefine our ways of working to effectively solve problems? And how can we approach our work as a design challenge in this fast-changing digital world?

DEI executives and practitioners often want to challenge assumption and inspire innovation. The traditional DEI approach of “best practices” is tactical because of its reactive mode and because it is compliance-driven with marginal thinking. That is why we witness stagnant results and limited value creation in the workforce. Thinking like a designer can help us transform and advance DEI efforts by being more strategic and human-centric.

With its signature traits of establishing systemic and growth mindsets, being problem-oriented, and seeking out-of-box solutions and innovative breakthroughs, design thinking can offer us an effective tool to grapple with speedy change and complex problems and can propel our workforce to outperform the competition in the future.

Stanford University maps out the design thinking process as shown in the figure on page 22.

Let’s follow this road map and examine how design thinking principles can assist us to holistically solve more complex and intertwined DEI challenges today.

Embrace Design Thinking
By Donald Fan
Despite best intentions, our diversity, equity and inclusion efforts often fail. Let’s consider two questions: How can we challenge the thinking and assumptions in DEI from past decades to redefine our ways of working to effectively solve problems? And how can we approach our work as a design challenge in this fast-changing digital world?

DEI executives and practitioners often want to challenge assumption and inspire innovation. The traditional DEI approach of “best practices” is tactical because of its reactive mode and because it is compliance-driven with marginal thinking. That is why we witness stagnant results and limited value creation in the workforce. Thinking like a designer can help us transform and advance DEI efforts by being more strategic and human-centric.

With its signature traits of establishing systemic and growth mindsets, being problem-oriented, and seeking out-of-box solutions and innovative breakthroughs, design thinking can offer us an effective tool to grapple with speedy change and complex problems and can propel our workforce to outperform the competition in the future.

Stanford University maps out the design thinking process as shown in the figure on page 22.

Let’s follow this road map and examine how design thinking principles can assist us to holistically solve more complex and intertwined DEI challenges today.

Sponsored Content
Human-Centered Design for a Brave New Workforce
As a younger generation takes the reins of business leadership, can design thinking help ease the growing pains?
Last year, Tom Merrill, a Master Facilitator at ExperiencePoint (a leading innovation training company), began working with a new client. The small American logistics firm was struggling with a major transition inside their executive team; the baby boomers who had founded the company thirty-odd years ago were suddenly retiring en masse. A new generation was stepping in to replace them, but this younger crop of leaders had come of age in a vastly different world and had wildly divergent ideas about company priorities and culture.
Sponsored Content
Sponsored Content
Giving employees a new lease on LiFE
Case study: FedEx Express and the University of Memphis Global created a successful business-academic partnership designed to reduce attrition and drive growth
By: Tim Harnett

With low unemployment and flat university enrollment rates, both businesses and academic institutions need new tactics to boost attendance and drive recruiting and retention efforts. This environment is driving the need to new business-academic partnerships to give employees the skills they need to thrive in the workplace.

One such partnership is the one between FedEx Express and the University of Memphis Global. The two organizations recently teamed up to create several academic programs that would boost retention rates at the Memphis Hub of FedEx Express and increase enrollment numbers for the University of Memphis. Along the way, both organizations disrupted the traditional models of adult education and tuition assistance.

2019 Learning In Practice Awards title

“Acharismatic and passionate leader with fearless vision makes this L&D initiative an example of cultural and change management ‘guts.’ ”

“The outcomes prove that the design, deployment and leadership were spot on.”

“This sounds like an amazing undertaking.”

These were just a few of the comments received from judges of Chief Learning Officer’s 2019 Learning In Practice Awards.

This year marked the 17th anniversary of the awards program, honoring learning industry leaders who have demonstrated excellence in the design and delivery of employee development programs through a combination of qualities such as leadership, vision, business acumen and strategic alignment. Judges selected the winners from almost 150 submitted nominations. The winners were honored at a reception during the 2019 CLO Fall Symposium in Chicago.

Practitioners received awards across eight categories in two divisions: Division 1 for companies with 10,000 employees or more and Division 2 for companies with fewer than 10,000 employees. Categories included Business Impact, Innovation and Talent Management, to name a few, as well as the industry’s top honor, CLO of the Year. Learning providers and vendor companies were also recognized for their excellence in eight categories, including Academic Partnerships, E-Learning, Technology Innovation and more.

This year’s winners included executives from acrossthe United States, as well as international finalists from Canada, Denmark, England, France, the Netherlands and Switzerland.

Congratulations to this year’s winners for the pursuit and achievement of excellence in the design and delivery of learning! Nominations for the 2020 Learning In Practice Awards will open in April.

PRACTITIONER AWARDS

CLO of the Year: For the learning executive who is without peer in developing and executing learning and development strategies, marshaling and managing resources, and achieving measurable success. The CLO of the Year award recognizes executives for their body of work over the course of their career.

Business Impact: For learning executives who have implemented a significant measurement or evaluation program that has demonstrated exceptional business impact from their workforce development programs. Potential results may include measures of employee retention, sales, revenue growth, customer satisfaction or cost reduction, among others.

Business Partnership: For learning departments that have partnered in a progressive way with business partners or external organizational divisions and functions such as the sales and marketing department or external customer groups to develop and deliver a targeted employee development program that supports the partner’s goals.

Innovation: For learning executives who have marshaled resources and applied innovative practices, processes and/or technologies in a new and groundbreaking way to address a significant business or organizational opportunity.

Strategy: For learning executives who have demonstrated exceptional business acumen combined with forward-looking vision to develop and execute a comprehensive learning strategy that clearly aligns employee development with broader organizational strategy.

Talent Management: For learning executives who have developed a program that effectively integrates learning into broader talent management initiatives such as employee engagement, onboarding, succession planning, recruiting or performance management.

Technology: For learning executives who have delivered new and unique applications of emerging technology to employee learning and development.

Trailblazer: For learning executives who have either launched a new enterprise learning function or completely overhauled existing workforce development initiatives in the past year.

PROVIDER AWARDS

Excellence in Academic Partnerships: Recognizes accredited academic learning institutions that have partnered with an organization in the past year to develop skills, competency or knowledge in a general employee population.

Excellence in Blended Learning: Recognizes vendors that have deployed a variety of tools in support of a client’s learning program that delivers engaging learning combining multiple modalities.

Excellence in Community Service: Recognizes vendors that have provided significant investment of company resources and time in support of a community service project or initiative.

Excellence in Content: Recognizes vendors that have created superior customized and/or off-the-shelf learning content.

Excellence in E-Learning: Recognizes vendors that have rolled out an innovative and effective e-learning program or suite for a client.

Excellence in Executive Education: Recognizes executive education providers that have delivered a targeted executive education program for a client that has delivered measurable results.

Excellence in Technology Innovation: Recognizes vendors that have rolled out an innovative learning technology for a client such as machine learning, artificial intelligence, apps, video, social collaboration tools or games and simulations.

Excellence in Partnerships: Recognizes vendors or consultants that have effectively supported a client’s learning and development function to set strategy or establish or implement a program via consulting or whole or partial outsources services.

“Acharismatic and passionate leader with fearless vision makes this L&D initiative an example of cultural and change management ‘guts.’ ”

“The outcomes prove that the design, deployment and leadership were spot on.”

“This sounds like an amazing undertaking.”

These were just a few of the comments received from judges of Chief Learning Officer’s 2019 Learning In Practice Awards.

This year marked the 17th anniversary of the awards program, honoring learning industry leaders who have demonstrated excellence in the design and delivery of employee development programs through a combination of qualities such as leadership, vision, business acumen and strategic alignment. Judges selected the winners from almost 150 submitted nominations. The winners were honored at a reception during the 2019 CLO Fall Symposium in Chicago.

Practitioners received awards across eight categories in two divisions: Division 1 for companies with 10,000 employees or more and Division 2 for companies with fewer than 10,000 employees. Categories included Business Impact, Innovation and Talent Management, to name a few, as well as the industry’s top honor, CLO of the Year. Learning providers and vendor companies were also recognized for their excellence in eight categories, including Academic Partnerships, E-Learning, Technology Innovation and more.

This year’s winners included executives from acrossthe United States, as well as international finalists from Canada, Denmark, England, France, the Netherlands and Switzerland.

Congratulations to this year’s winners for the pursuit and achievement of excellence in the design and delivery of learning! Nominations for the 2020 Learning In Practice Awards will open in April.

PRACTITIONER AWARDS

CLO of the Year: For the learning executive who is without peer in developing and executing learning and development strategies, marshaling and managing resources, and achieving measurable success. The CLO of the Year award recognizes executives for their body of work over the course of their career.

Business Impact: For learning executives who have implemented a significant measurement or evaluation program that has demonstrated exceptional business impact from their workforce development programs. Potential results may include measures of employee retention, sales, revenue growth, customer satisfaction or cost reduction, among others.

Business Partnership: For learning departments that have partnered in a progressive way with business partners or external organizational divisions and functions such as the sales and marketing department or external customer groups to develop and deliver a targeted employee development program that supports the partner’s goals.

Innovation: For learning executives who have marshaled resources and applied innovative practices, processes and/or technologies in a new and groundbreaking way to address a significant business or organizational opportunity.

Strategy: For learning executives who have demonstrated exceptional business acumen combined with forward-looking vision to develop and execute a comprehensive learning strategy that clearly aligns employee development with broader organizational strategy.

Talent Management: For learning executives who have developed a program that effectively integrates learning into broader talent management initiatives such as employee engagement, onboarding, succession planning, recruiting or performance management.

Technology: For learning executives who have delivered new and unique applications of emerging technology to employee learning and development.

Trailblazer: For learning executives who have either launched a new enterprise learning function or completely overhauled existing workforce development initiatives in the past year.

PROVIDER AWARDS

Excellence in Academic Partnerships: Recognizes accredited academic learning institutions that have partnered with an organization in the past year to develop skills, competency or knowledge in a general employee population.

Excellence in Blended Learning: Recognizes vendors that have deployed a variety of tools in support of a client’s learning program that delivers engaging learning combining multiple modalities.

Excellence in Community Service: Recognizes vendors that have provided significant investment of company resources and time in support of a community service project or initiative.

Excellence in Content: Recognizes vendors that have created superior customized and/or off-the-shelf learning content.

Excellence in E-Learning: Recognizes vendors that have rolled out an innovative and effective e-learning program or suite for a client.

Excellence in Executive Education: Recognizes executive education providers that have delivered a targeted executive education program for a client that has delivered measurable results.

Excellence in Technology Innovation: Recognizes vendors that have rolled out an innovative learning technology for a client such as machine learning, artificial intelligence, apps, video, social collaboration tools or games and simulations.

Excellence in Partnerships: Recognizes vendors or consultants that have effectively supported a client’s learning and development function to set strategy or establish or implement a program via consulting or whole or partial outsources services.

Jim Woolsey Is the 2019 CLO of the Year

By Elizabeth Loutfi

Throughout his career, Jim Woolsey has focused on progress. As president of DAU, he’s continuing this tradition.
Jim Woolsey started planning for the future of Defense Acquisition University when he became the organization’s president in January 2014, and he hasn’t stopped planning since.

In fact, before leaving his office the day before hopping on a plane to attend Chief Learning Officer’s 2019 Fall Symposium in Chicago, where he would receive this year’s 2019 CLO of the Year award, he sent a note to his team about setting up the next step in evolution they will head at DAU.

As president of DAU, Woolsey oversees all acquisition education activities and programs, including online and instructor-led training, knowledge sharing, job support tools, consulting engagement, customized workshops, research and the university’s strategic partnerships across five geographical regions, which support and serve a defense acquisition workforce of more than 173,000 military and federal civilian employees.

BUSINESS IMPACT
DIV. 1
Kristin Cassino holding gold award
▲ Kristin Cassino
Manager, Learning Services, Liberty Mutual Insurance Global Risk Solutions
Many companies are content with finding a positive correlation between learning delivery and business impact, but Liberty Mutual found a way to separate itself from the pack. The learning services team, managed by Kristin Cassino, set out to create an entire methodology to track the relationship between training and outcomes, with hard data to back it up.

The discontent with differing measurements and communication between business partners and the learning services department inspired the need to design a new blueprint to scale how effective learning can affect business revenue. Time savings, cost savings, customer experience, retention, efficiency gained and change in quality assurance scores are all factors now being considered in new programs’ evaluations.

Learning Services not only developed an infrastructure able to support the amount of data collected from sources across the company, they also created a measurement and evaluation philosophy. Aligning their own distinct business values with practical data collection tactics proved worthwhile when presenting their findings to business partners.

With a new methodology to track effective changes in training and streamlined values across departments, Liberty Mutual can try out and assess new training techniques with relative ease.

— Kerry Snider
Mark Boccia holding silver award
▲ Mark Boccia
Director of L&D,
Royal Caribbean Cruises Ltd.
Faced with a swelling number of new hires and the need to upskill promoted current employees, Royal Caribbean departed from their rigid training model of over-the-shoulder, on-the-job training, which had proved an ineffective use of time for both crew members and managers. Mark Boccia oversaw the shift to EMBARK, Royal Caribbean’s latest learning initiative.

EMBARK increases job skills proficiency for multiple job roles onboard Royal Caribbean ships by offering short, interactive digital learning modules. Hundreds of modules have been created for different departments, including Food and Beverage, Housekeeping, Lifeguard and Guest Services. The platform offers a clean, mobile-responsive user interface, videos, interactive content, quizzes and practicals.

Consistent from ship to ship, crew members across departments were able to implement EMBARK, access it from any device they wished, both on land and at sea, and provide any feedback they had along the way.

— Kerry Snider
Excellence in
Academic Partnerships
Christobal Valdez
Partners in Leadership ►
Partners in Leadership ▲
Richland Community College was facing a number of challenges that were hindering its ability to operate at full potential. The institution lost more than 22 percent of student enrollment over six years. The student retention rate was even lower at 46.24 percent for next term and 8.46 percent for fall to fall. Departments were functioning in silos with minimal collaboration. Employees were unclear on the institution’s goals. A division between the faculty and staff was apparent. Ownership was lacking on all projects.

To create a learning strategy that would develop a workforce based on accountability and employee engagement, RCC brought on Partners in Leadership. In 2017, RCC launched its initiative on personal accountability utilizing the Accountability Builder program. The workshops and assessments were designed to help break down silos, encourage collaboration, and get employees personally invested in the specific goals of the organization. A group of four internal volunteers became the mentors and champions of Partners in Leadership’s models and methodologies. This group acts as the liaisons between the institution’s daily practices and implementation of Partners in Leadership’s curriculum. Supervisor training was also implemented.

Today, RCC is surpassing its three key results: improving enrollment, employee engagement and economic sustainability.

— Ashley St. John
Christobal Valdez
Center for Leadership at Florida International University
Daikin Industries, based in Osaka, Japan, has experienced rapid global growth over the past several decades, especially in the U.S. This growth led to several key challenges: How could Daikin continue to grow while still retaining a strong, values-based culture with people at the center? And how could they ensure that leaders were equipped for current and future challenges?

Daikin’s CHRO worked closely with the Center for Leadership to develop the Daikin North America Leadership Program, an initiative designed to build strategic capacity, drive development and effectiveness using multimodal learning, and energize the organization, starting with core leaders. This collaboration resulted in the creation of a rigorous developmental program with sessions led by seven subject matter experts and Daikin leadership. The program design emphasized practical application and practice sessions as learning mechanisms. The use of experiential as well as classroom learning was critical to ensure the sustainability of learning and equipped participants with strategies to share out to their teams upon return to work.

The program design included a robust evaluation protocol including various surveys and evaluation forms. In their overall evaluation of the program, ninety-four percent of participants rated it as “very good” or “excellent.” One hundred percent agreed or strongly agreed that participating in the program will help them become better leaders for Daikin.

— Ashley St. John

Case Study


A Development-Focused Organization
By Sarah Fister Gale
A

bbVie has defined a radical new approach to live, web-based content that captivates its audience and has transformed the learning culture at the $33 billion biopharma company.

AbbVie, based in North Chicago, Illinois, was spun off from Abbott Laboratories in 2013, taking over all of the global company’s pharmaceutical activities. Rather than replicating the Abbott Labs environment in the new organization, AbbVie’s leaders saw an opportunity to create a new corporate culture that reflected the scientific focus of the business and its people.

“AbbVie is full of scientists who love to learn,” said Michael Poll, director of talent development. But he knew that if they were just learning for learning’s sake, it wouldn’t help them perform any better.

Business Intelligence


Cheers to Alignment and Agility in 2020
Chief learning officers express positivity going into the new year.
By Ashley St. John
Y

et another year is drawing to a close, and it’s time to break out the bubbly and celebrate. As they look toward 2020, chief learning officers are in generally good spirits, at least regarding their outlook for learning and development.

According to data from the Chief Learning Officer Business Intelligence Board’s “2019 Learning State of the Industry” report, 71 percent of CLOs say their outlook for the next 12 to 18 months is more optimistic than last year (Figure 1). Twenty-two percent say it’s about the same as last year, and 7 percent are less optimistic.

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In Conclusion


Scenario-Based Microlearning for Soft Skills
A neuroscience perspective on people skills training By Todd Maddox
Author Todd Maddox
Todd Maddox is CEO and founder of Cognitive Design and Statistical Consulting LLC.
J

ob success requires strong hard and technical skills, and strong interpersonal and people (or soft) skills. Hard and technical skills training involves imparting information, knowledge, facts and figures on a learner. Training an employee on the rules and regulations of appropriate conduct, how to use a new software program, or the technical and mathematical skills needed to conduct data science are examples. Interpersonal and people skills involve a deep understanding of another’s perspective (e.g., empathy) and of how our actions are interpreted by and affect others. How to communicate and collaborate effectively and how to lead are examples.

Research by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching suggests that 85 percent of job success comes from having strong people skills, with only 15 percent coming from technical skills and hard skills. With the rapid rate of change in the workplace associated with digital transformation, people skills are becoming even more important. Therefore, effective people skills training is a must to keep organizations and their employees competitive.

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