January/February 2019

January/February 2019

Editor’s Letter


Burgers and Basics

L

et me set the record straight for those still in doubt: Hamburgers are not made of ham.

We live in a politically divided time when fake news and alternative facts have regrettably become a common part of the lexicon. But on that basic culinary fact we should be able to agree.

Yet even that kind of common knowledge isn’t always common. It’s a useful reminder for chief learning officers as another year begins.

There will undoubtedly be many new developments in education technology this year, emerging applications and exciting methodologies that engage learners and provide powerful potential opportunities for development. Technology is advancing at a dizzying pace that is exhilarating to watch. Access to the world’s entire collection of knowledge and expertise is at the tips of our fingers and learning organizations will march ever forward with new initiatives and programs.

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10


Mike Kennedy of the National Basketball Association on his career journey; Vi’s Judy Whitcomb talks cultivating talent outside the organization; and what people are reading these days.

40


Profile

Sarah Fister Gale
Texas Health Resources’ ambitious CLO, Daniel Gandarilla, is transforming the learning culture and tearing down silos.

60


Case Study

Sarah Fister Gale
Campari Group is using political articles and lifestyle magazines to help employees learn English.

62


Business Intelligence

Ashley St. John
To navigate ongoing change, CLOs are prioritizing strategic alignment.

Features

22
Alida Miranda-Wolff
Is cultural immersion the next wave in leadership development and diversity, equity and inclusion?
44
Alexandra Levit
Success in today’s business world mandates a continuous, flexible approach to learning.
50
Ave Rio
Help employees take on an entrepreneurial spirit by fostering a safe environment that allows for failure and innovation.
56
David Woods
Is your organization still at the start of the digital learning path? These easy steps will bring your training into the digital age.

Experts

14
Elliott Masie
The Learning Blockchain Emerges
16
Bob Mosher
It’s Time to Include the BME
18
Ken Blanchard
Mastering Organizational Leadership
20
David DeFilippo
Learning From the Best and the Worst
66
Kelly Palmer
Combat Content Overload

Resources

4
Burgers and Basics

Your Career


Your Career


Career Advice From

Mike Kennedy

LEARNING AND DEVELOPMENT LEADER AND ASSOCIATE VICE PRESIDENT, NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION

Mike Kennedy, learning and development leader and associate vice president at the National Basketball Association, shares his career journey and how he came into L&D.

What’s been your career path?

I started out with the idea that I was going to be a therapist. My graduate training was in cognitive behavioral psychotherapy and at the time I was working in mental health services. I had the good fortune moving into a training capacity in that field. Once my education was finishing up and I started getting in front of people to practice therapy, I had the harrowing realization that it wasn’t really well-suited to my temperament. Thankfully I had by then discovered that the training department for the mental health agency was something that I was very well-suited for. It took me a while to realize it, but my preparation to be a therapist was actually very helpful at stages of my career — for teaching me some diagnostic tools and giving me the mindset to look more deeply for root causes, as opposed to just solutions, which has given me some differentiation in my field.

The most important part of learning is:
Learner values. If you can’t make the case that the learning merits attention, there’s no reason for the learner to commit.

The most overrated trend in L&D is:
Gamification. The notion that all learners are motivated by competition is misguided, and even those who are find many of our “gamified” solutions laughable.

Your Career


Your Career


What Are You Reading?

The Life of Patrick Henry

By William Wirt

I find that biographies help me to understand history better. More importantly, it helps me to understand myself better. Reading about the successes and failures of people who lived before helps me to understand that I’m not as far removed from some of them, which means that I could probably do more, better. It is always a challenge.

Your Career


Your Career


Top of Mind

Help Wanted: Cultivating Talent Outside Your Organization By Judy Whitcomb

As chief human resources and learning officer, Judy Whitcomb oversees the human resources functions and learning and organizational development for Vi, a national developer, owner and operator of resort-like senior living communities.

With unemployment at a 30-year low, many organizations are struggling with attracting and retaining talent. Immediately and in the many years to come, chief learning and talent officers will need to shift their focus on cultivating talent internally to developing and executing on strategies externally.

While many organizations may have strategies and resources dedicated to college campus or trade school recruitment, a new focus on developing a talent pipeline through high school relationships and apprenticeships is essential. There is value in exposing high school students to career pathing and/or apprenticeship programs early on as there is potential to combine work-based, on-the-job learning with relevant technical education in the classroom. Students who participate in these programs may graduate with a high school diploma and real work experience and, in some cases, earn college credits and industry credentials. They also may start on a career path that continues after high school graduation.

imperatives


The Learning Blockchain Emerges

Blockchains focused on learning have great potential By Elliott Masie

Elliott Masie is CEO of The Masie Center, an international think tank focused on learning and workplace productivity, and chairman and CLO of The Masie Center’s Learning Consortium.
He can be reached at editor@CLOmedia.com.

D

uring the past 20 years, the learning field has evolved through a range of learning systems — learning management systems, learning content management systems, learning experience/record systems, curation collection systems and more. The hope was to build an enterprise system that would contain much of the content, record-keeping and transactions around learning. And it sort of works.

But a conversation echoes in my brain from a meeting many years ago. I was on a board with Eric Schmidt, who was then head of Google, and he asked why learning departments were trying to “stuff everything into a single system” (like an LMS). He was perplexed about why we didn’t just find a way to track the content or data that we needed — from a wide spectrum of systems — and call it up in real time when necessary.

We started to imagine a simpler LMS or a dimension of a talent system that could do some of the core tracking and access elements of corporate learning. But we recognized that the data and resources we wanted to use lived in a wide and open set of other systems:

selling up, selling down


It’s Time to Include the BME

The business matter expert: a new stakeholder By Bob Mosher

Bob Mosher is a senior partner and chief learning evangelist for APPLY Synergies, a strategic consulting firm.
He can be reached at editor@CLOmedia.com.

I

recently heard from a colleague who shared the following story with me. He was facilitating a design meeting to create a course for new managers. In the room were his traditional stakeholder subject matter experts. Two new managers also were invited in to listen.

According to my colleague, one and a half days into what felt like an amazing data-gathering exercise, one of the new managers spoke up. She said, “Although all of this information is amazing and will ultimately help me become an effective manager, my biggest concern is surviving my first 30 days without being fired or sued. You just filled four whiteboards with tasks each of you do every day. I hope to get there someday as well. However, if this is the class you create for me, I’ll be overwhelmed by noon of the first day, and I won’t be able to use most of this anytime soon.”

leadership


Mastering Organizational Leadership

Leadership style should depend on an organization’s development By Ken Blanchard

Ken Blanchard is chief spiritual officer of The Ken Blanchard Cos. and co-author of “Servant Leadership in Action.”
He can be reached at editor@CLOmedia.com.

J

ust as leading a team is more complicated than one-on-one leadership, leading an entire organization is more complicated than leading a single team. Yet organizational leadership is worth mastering because an effective leader’s influence on an organization can bring people and systems together into a harmonious whole.

The first step in leading an organization is to diagnose the organization’s development level. The second step is to adapt your leadership style to that development stage. How do you diagnose the development level of an entire organization? The answer is to look at the organization’s results — the amount and quality of work accomplished in relation to the organization’s purpose and goals — and its relationships — the quality of interactions people have within and outside the organization.

ON THE FRONT LINE


Lessons From the Best and the Worst

Learning from good and bad managers BY DAVID DeFILIPPO

David DeFilippo is chief people officer for Suffolk.
He can be reached at editor@CLOmedia.com.

A

person’s connection with their direct manager is often one of the most important they have at work, and the quality of that relationship has an impact on their day-to-day satisfaction. In his book, “First Break All of the Rules,” author and motivational speaker Marcus Buckingham notably stated, “People leave managers, not companies.” In my regular review of employee attrition trends, this cause is typically among the top three reasons that employees vote with their feet for any given time period. How can the current and aspiring people managers of the world learn from those bosses who inspired them as well as those who demotivated them and diminished their contributions?

BY ALIDA MIRANDA-WOLFF

Diversity and inclusion is one of the most pressing issues facing companies today. But after years of rolling out initiatives that reap few to no rewards, diversity fatigue is setting in.

The numbers in Atlassian’s “State of Diversity and Inclusion in U.S. Tech” show just how much diversity fatigue is affecting the tech industry. While 80 percent of the 1,900 respondents surveyed agreed that diversity, equity and inclusion was important, individual participation in related initiatives fell by as much as 50 percent, with more than 40 percent of respondents believing their companies needed no improvement despite fewer than 30 percent of underrepresented groups experiencing representation, retention and a sense of belonging.

There are many reasons for burnout. Diversity programs are often introduced into companies that are struggling with representation already, which means filling diversity slates takes longer and requires more investment. Plus, while D&I is largely viewed by companies as valuable, leaders aren’t held accountable to progress the same way they are when it comes to earnings.

BY ALIDA MIRANDA-WOLFF

Diversity and inclusion is one of the most pressing issues facing companies today. But after years of rolling out initiatives that reap few to no rewards, diversity fatigue is setting in.

The numbers in Atlassian’s “State of Diversity and Inclusion in U.S. Tech” show just how much diversity fatigue is affecting the tech industry. While 80 percent of the 1,900 respondents surveyed agreed that diversity, equity and inclusion was important, individual participation in related initiatives fell by as much as 50 percent, with more than 40 percent of respondents believing their companies needed no improvement despite fewer than 30 percent of underrepresented groups experiencing representation, retention and a sense of belonging.

There are many reasons for burnout. Diversity programs are often introduced into companies that are struggling with representation already, which means filling diversity slates takes longer and requires more investment. Plus, while D&I is largely viewed by companies as valuable, leaders aren’t held accountable to progress the same way they are when it comes to earnings.

BY ALIDA MIRANDA-WOLFF

Diversity and inclusion is one of the most pressing issues facing companies today. But after years of rolling out initiatives that reap few to no rewards, diversity fatigue is setting in.

The numbers in Atlassian’s “State of Diversity and Inclusion in U.S. Tech” show just how much diversity fatigue is affecting the tech industry. While 80 percent of the 1,900 respondents surveyed agreed that diversity, equity and inclusion was important, individual participation in related initiatives fell by as much as 50 percent, with more than 40 percent of respondents believing their companies needed no improvement despite fewer than 30 percent of underrepresented groups experiencing representation, retention and a sense of belonging.

There are many reasons for burnout. Diversity programs are often introduced into companies that are struggling with representation already, which means filling diversity slates takes longer and requires more investment. Plus, while D&I is largely viewed by companies as valuable, leaders aren’t held accountable to progress the same way they are when it comes to earnings.

But perhaps the biggest reason for burnout is the simplest: The existing programs aren’t working. Focused more on quotas, multiyear program roll-outs and company restructuring, many of the diversity, equity and inclusion initiatives in play today are missing the point.

Ultimately, creating inclusive environments that foster diversity comes down to understanding and appreciating individuals as full-fledged people rather than categories, which leads teams to support and fight for equity in ways that combat fatigue.

Agile HR Is Here Now. Is Your Organization Ready?

“Agile” isn’t just for tech anymore. Are you leading the charge for agile HR, or taking a wait-and-see approach? Find out how HR leaders in major firms from IBM to Cigna to Bank of Montreal are innovating agile talent practices to meet the swiftly changing needs of today’s business.

Agile practices have spread from technology into product development, manufacturing, and marketing, and now into HR. Many human resources executives and chief learning officers are faced with moving away from their familiar rules- and planning-based approach toward a faster, participant-driven model. Is your HR organization on board?

In the recent Harvard Business Review article “HR Goes Agile,” Wharton’s Peter Cappelli and NYU’s Anna Tavis discuss how the agile methodology affects a wide range of industries. Cappelli is the director of Wharton’s Center for Human Resources, and his thought leadership has been widely published, including in the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, Forbes, and the Atlantic.

Yes, You Need a Talent Management System

In an era of talent scarcity, employer separation from the crowd is essential to compete.

By Adina Sapp

With only 0.87 workers per available position,1 it’s likely that you must recruit internally to find the right candidate. This has clear implications for the talent management (TM) capabilities of your HR system.

Many large organizations have invested in a one-sizefits- all HR generalist system with the aim of satisfying all HR needs. But recent research suggests 39 percent of organizations don’t believe their HR systems provide enough data to make talent decisions.2

The problem is that many of these systems neglect the TM cycle, both in design and in practice. Mike Bollinger, global vice president of thought leadership and advisory services at Cornerstone OnDemand, points out that specialist TM systems aren’t necessarily better than generalist systems; they simply serve different purposes.

Why Corporate Culture is Hard

How to ‘Walk the Talk’ of a Values-Focused Culture

By Shiva Rajgopal, professor of accounting and auditing and vice dean of research at Columbia Business School

For more than 10 years, my colleagues and I have been surveying CEOs and CFOs, exploring the financial and accounting challenges faced by today’s companies, large and small. And even in the context of issues such as financial reporting or disclosure or earnings management, many CEOs or financial executives would tell us, unprompted, “It’s not in our culture to do X,” and “It’s not in our culture to do Y.”

We thus began to realize that culture is universally important, but nevertheless, we hesitated to launch a study of the topic for several reasons. First, it’s a difficult topic to capture: it’s hard to define — it means different things to different people — and hard to measure. Second, the topic is not part of the competitive advantage of our accounting and auditing discipline and might be better left to management strategy specialists. Finally, corporate culture is seen by many in my field as unscientific because it is often used as the residual claimant: in other words, if I can’t find some other reason to explain, for example, why banks fail, I might claim its culture as a culprit.

Closing the soft skills gap

Recent Bellevue University research shows soft skills assessment needs leader investment and objective evidence

By Tim Harnett

Soft skills are critical for business success. They have the power to deliver substantial returns — a recent MIT and Boston College joint case study found an in-house soft skills training course brought a 250 percent return on investment.1 Yet there’s a commonly held belief that soft skills are non-measurable,2 which might hinder efforts to incorporate soft skills training into other initiatives. Learning leaders are convinced of the need to develop soft skills at their organizations. How do they go about it? To discover the answer to this question and more, Bellevue University partnered with Chief Learning Officer magazine for the Making the Business Case for Soft Skills survey. While full survey results will be published in a forthcoming white paper, here’s a snapshot of what nearly 600 learning leaders told us about the state of soft skills at their organizations.

Transitioning from managing process to leading people

By Tim Harnett

Organizations today are being increasingly judged on their relationships with their employees as much as by their ability to produce goods or services.1 As we move further into the next industrial age, tools and processes will become less important than how leaders interact with their people. Poor communication accounts for an average loss of $62.4 million per year at companies with 100,000 employees and $420,000 per year at companies with fewer than 100 employees.2

The need for leaders to have superlative communication skills is one factor in the rise of the demand for more and better soft skills among leaders. Soft skills development has emerged as one of the biggest needs in companies today, according to Richard Richards, champion of presence: leader, individual and virtual for Ariel. “There’s been a shift from people managing organizations to leading people. Managing may be more focused around processes, while leading inspires people toward a common strategic vision or organizational goal.”

Talent Activation

Turning Potential into Performance

By Adina Sapp

Despite research from the DeVry University Career Advisory Board’s 2018 annual survey showing that 77 percent of L&D experts feel their organizations are doing a good job of developing the workforce, the persistent skills gap and high rate of employee disengagement across the industry says otherwise. So, what’s missing?

In keeping with its commitment to providing workforce solutions and forming employer education partnerships, DeVryWORKS, the employer partnership team of DeVry University, put together a panel of learning leaders to explore this topic in a discussion titled Activate Talent and Unleash Potential. The intent was to provide tangible strategies to activate your talent, trigger improved performance and energize your business growth trajectory.

Profile


Status Quo? Not This CLO

Texas Health Resources’ ambitious CLO, Daniel Gandarilla, is transforming the learning culture, tearing down silos and saving millions of dollars in the process.

By Sarah Fister Gale

Daniel Gandarilla was always drawn to the idea of helping people — though he wasn’t entirely sure which path to follow. He began his college career studying psychology but switched to education. After getting a master’s degree, he taught middle school and high school, volunteered with the Red Cross, and spent time in Mexico City teaching English to American Express executives.

He didn’t find his true calling until he returned from Mexico and was promoted to director of student activities at the school he was teaching at during the time. That’s when he realized he wanted to build a career in educational leadership. “I loved it,” he said. So he went to Texas Christian University’s Neeley School of Business to pursue a dual Master of Business Administration/doctorate in education — and it changed his life.

By Alexandra Levit

Employees can no longer master a single skill set and expect to skate by for the rest of their careers. Success in today’s business world mandates a continuous approach to learning.

A former manager once told me I had the ability to quickly assimilate information, that he could tell me how to do something and I would then apply that knowledge to a variety of different situations. I now see this feedback as the ultimate compliment, for my manager felt I had learning agility.

Learning agility is openness to new information and the ability to gain and apply insights derived from this information. People with this trait often follow a nontraditional path and can develop professionally from an array of diverse experiences. Learning-agile people aren’t perturbed by shifts in direction. They are focused on the end state and are willing to put themselves out there. When they fall, they get back up. They take risks and often receive commensurate rewards.

By Alexandra Levit

Employees can no longer master a single skill set and expect to skate by for the rest of their careers. Success in today’s business world mandates a continuous approach to learning.

A former manager once told me I had the ability to quickly assimilate information, that he could tell me how to do something and I would then apply that knowledge to a variety of different situations. I now see this feedback as the ultimate compliment, for my manager felt I had learning agility.

Learning agility is openness to new information and the ability to gain and apply insights derived from this information. People with this trait often follow a nontraditional path and can develop professionally from an array of diverse experiences. Learning-agile people aren’t perturbed by shifts in direction. They are focused on the end state and are willing to put themselves out there. When they fall, they get back up. They take risks and often receive commensurate rewards.

Learning leaders can help employees seize the entrepreneurial spirit by fostering a safe environment that allows for failure and innovation.

BY AVE RIO

In 2007, two designers struggling to pay bills had an idea to rent out three air mattresses on their living-room floor and cook breakfast for their guests. The idea struck during a design conference in San Francisco when the city’s hotels were fully booked. The two men created a website, Airbedandbreakfast.com, and charged $80 per night.

The designers, Joe Gebbia and Brian Chesky, decided to target conferences, aiming to have locals list their rooms for conference attendees to book. Next, they attempted to take the idea to the South by Southwest conference in Austin, Texas, but the idea flopped. Only six people put up listings and just two people booked them — one being Chesky himself. In an interview with National Public Radio host Guy Raz in the podcast “How I Built This,” Gebbia said this failure was “completely demoralizing.”

Learning leaders can help employees seize the entrepreneurial spirit by fostering a safe environment that allows for failure and innovation.

BY AVE RIO

In 2007, two designers struggling to pay bills had an idea to rent out three air mattresses on their living-room floor and cook breakfast for their guests. The idea struck during a design conference in San Francisco when the city’s hotels were fully booked. The two men created a website, Airbedandbreakfast.com, and charged $80 per night.

The designers, Joe Gebbia and Brian Chesky, decided to target conferences, aiming to have locals list their rooms for conference attendees to book. Next, they attempted to take the idea to the South by Southwest conference in Austin, Texas, but the idea flopped. Only six people put up listings and just two people booked them — one being Chesky himself. In an interview with National Public Radio host Guy Raz in the podcast “How I Built This,” Gebbia said this failure was “completely demoralizing.”

Gebbia and Chesky sought feedback from guests and discovered that people found exchanging money in person awkward, especially inside a home. Taking the feedback, Gebbia and Chesky decided to bring the transaction online, allowing people to seamlessly pay with a credit card. Suddenly, the two realized they had a business model — a 3 percent service fee from hosts to cover the cost of processing payments online and to help operate the Airbnb platform, as well as a 6 to 12 percent guest service fee from bookers. Today, Airbnb is the preferred lodging experience for millions of people around the world and has expanded into a multimillion-dollar business.

Raz summed up this lesson as “failure is your friend” in his keynote at the Chief Learning Officer Symposium in Houston last October. Through interviewing entrepreneurs for his podcast, Raz has unique insight into the minds of the most successful entrepreneurs. But lessons from entrepreneurs can be extended outside the entrepreneurial field and into the world of learning and development. Learning leaders can nurture and support an entrepreneurial mindset inside organizations by creating a culture that supports failure, problem-solving and innovation.

In the pursuit of business success and bottom-line results, joy is an attribute that can often seem trivial or unimportant. But the irony is that joy originally evolved to motivate our early human ancestors to pursue goals, and psychologists are beginning to understand that rather than being a distraction from success, joy actually fuels it.

Can you define joy? We tend to confuse it with happiness and/or positivity.

The words joy and happiness are often used interchangeably, but from a scientific perspective, they actually have different meanings. Happiness is a kind of broad evaluation of how we feel about our lives over time. It’s complex and is influenced by a range of factors, from how fulfilled we are at work to the strength of our relationships to our genetic set point. But joy is simpler and more immediate. Joy is an intense, momentary experience of positive emotion, one that we can recognize by certain telltale expressions and sensations: smiling and laughter, and sensations of lightness or warmth, or a feeling like you want to jump up and down. I find this distinction important because while it’s sometimes hard to know if we feel happy, small moments of joy are much more accessible to us, even in difficult times.

BY DAVID WOODS


he landscape of employee learning and engagement is constantly shifting, but what does that mean for organizations that are just beginning their digital learning journey?

Artificial intelligence, adaptive learning and virtual reality: While these technologies are exciting for the potential they bring in training employees and offering more engaging experiences, there are many organizations that are still stuck in outdated modalities for whom such leaps are unthinkable. Many organizations are still printing and shipping manuals and binders all over the country or even the world to get information to their people.

But it doesn’t have to be that way.

BY DAVID WOODS


he landscape of employee learning and engagement is constantly shifting, but what does that mean for organizations that are just beginning their digital learning journey?

Artificial intelligence, adaptive learning and virtual reality: While these technologies are exciting for the potential they bring in training employees and offering more engaging experiences, there are many organizations that are still stuck in outdated modalities for whom such leaps are unthinkable. Many organizations are still printing and shipping manuals and binders all over the country or even the world to get information to their people.

But it doesn’t have to be that way.

BY DAVID WOODS


he landscape of employee learning and engagement is constantly shifting, but what does that mean for organizations that are just beginning their digital learning journey?

Artificial intelligence, adaptive learning and virtual reality: While these technologies are exciting for the potential they bring in training employees and offering more engaging experiences, there are many organizations that are still stuck in outdated modalities for whom such leaps are unthinkable. Many organizations are still printing and shipping manuals and binders all over the country or even the world to get information to their people.

But it doesn’t have to be that way.

In many industries, small, incremental changes can often be more practical to accomplish at speed than large, sweeping changes, and the same can be true for learning and development departments that feel stuck in their current training methods. The good news is that small steps along the digital learning path can lead to significant changes in your learners’ lives and in your training department’s efficacy.

Dusty binders and manuals are a thorn in the heel of many a CLO. Here’s where to start to bring your training into the digital age.

Case Study


The Language of Business

BY SARAH FISTER GALE

C

ampari Group may be best known for its signature aperitif, but the 158-year-old company has more than 50 brands in its portfolio, including Grand Marnier, Skyy Vodka and Wild Turkey bourbon. The $2 billion organization has more than 4,000 employees in offices in every region of the world. Its global presence means Campari employees often do business with clients in other countries, making language barriers a frequent concern.

Many global organizations rely on English as a language of choice when communicating across borders because it is so widely spoken. That’s great for English speakers, but it can be a challenge for everyone else. “Being a multinational company, our employees have had increasingly more contact with the English language in their day-to-day activities,” said Ana Claudia Gonçalves, human resources manager for Campari Group in Sao Paulo, Brazil. “Moreover, Campari is highly committed to its employees’ careers and development, and we understand how important English proficiency is for professional growth in today’s world.”

Business Intelligence


Disruption, Meet Strategy

CLOs are prioritizing strategic alignment to navigate ongoing change.

By Ashley St. John

A

s we begin 2019, the learning landscape continues to be dynamic.

When asked how the role of chief learning officer is changing, 76 percent of respondents to a 2018 survey of current and aspiring CLOs cited increased use of technology, 53 percent pointed to the importance of content curation versus creation, 47 percent cited expanding audiences and 46 percent noted CLOs are being tasked with modernizing legacy processes (Figure 1).

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in conclusion


Combat Content Overload

Resist the urge to create your own learning content By Kelly Palmer

Kelly Palmer is chief learning officer of Degreed and co-author of “The Expertise Economy: How the Smartest Companies Use Learning to Engage, Compete, and Succeed” with David Blake. She can be reached at editor@CLOmedia.com.

W

hen employees want to learn something new, where do they turn? In 2016, my company, Degreed, conducted a survey to find out. The responses showed that today’s workers turn first to their peers, bosses or mentors before searching the internet. The last thing they do is consult their learning organization.

This makes intuitive sense. Given the digital landfill bombarding today’s work environments, people know that consulting Google in order to learn something will give them millions of options — and that the top results might not be the best for them. So they instead want guidance from individuals they trust. They want to know how these people learned critical skills.

Thanks for reading our January/February 2019 issue!