July/August 2018

Editor’s Letter


The Buck Stops With Education

A

t one point in our not-too-distant past, we could look to our leaders as models of judgment and responsibility.

They weren’t flawless. They made imperfect decisions with incomplete information. They recognized there was a good chance a majority of people would disagree. But whatever the outcome, they shared credit if it turned out well and took the blame if it didn’t.

As former president Harry Truman was fond of saying, “The buck stops here.” He even had a sign with the saying on his desk in the Oval Office.

July/August 2018 | Volume 17, Issue 6

CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER
John R. Taggart
jrtag@CLOmedia.com

PRESIDENT
Kevin A. Simpson
ksimpson@CLOmedia.com

Vice President, GROUP PUBLISHER
Clifford Capone
ccapone@CLOmedia.com

VICE PRESIDENT, EDITOR IN CHIEF
Mike Prokopeak
mikep@CLOmedia.com

Editorial Director
Rick Bell
rbell@CLOmedia.com

Managing Editor
Ashley St. John
astjohn@CLOmedia.com

SENIOR EDITOR
Lauren Dixon
ldixon@CLOmedia.com

ASSOCIATE EDITORS
Andie Burjek
aburjek@CLOmedia.com

Ave Rio
ario@CLOmedia.com

ASSISTANT MANAGING EDITOR
Christopher Magnus
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editorial art director
Theresa Stoodley
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Video and Multimedia Producer
Andrew Kennedy Lewis
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Editorial Associates
Aysha Ashley Househ
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Rocio Villaseñor
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Vice President, RESEARCH & Advisory Services
Sarah Kimmel
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RESEARCH MANAGER
Tim Harnett
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Data Scientist
Grey Litaker
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Media & Production Manager
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Production Coordinator
Nina Howard
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VICE PRESIDENT, EVENTS
Trey Smith
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Events Content Editor
Malaz Elsheikh
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Webcast Manager
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BUSINESS MANAGER
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Marketing Director
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Marketing Specialist
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Regional Sales ManagerS
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Robert Stevens
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Director, Business Development 
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CONTRIBUTING WRITERS
Ken Blanchard
Rebecca G. Chandler
Walter Davis
Soren Eilertsen
Sarah Fister Gale
Elliott Masie
Lee Maxey
Jack J. Phillips
Patti P. Phillips
Tim Rahschulte

CHIEF LEARNING OFFICER EDITORIAL ADVISORY BOARD

Cedric Coco, EVP, Chief People Officer, Brookdale Senior Living Inc.
Lisa Doyle, Head of Retail Training, Ace Hardware
Dave DeFilippo, Chief People and Learning Officer, Suffolk
Tamar Elkeles, Chief Talent Executive, Atlantic Bridge Capital
Thomas Evans, (Ret.) Chief Learning Officer, PricewaterhouseCoopers
Gerry Hudson-Martin, Director, Corporate Learning Strategies, Business Architects
Kimo Kippen, President, Aloha Learning Advisors
Rob Lauber, Vice President, Chief Learning Officer, McDonald’s Corp.
Maj. Gen. Erwin F. Lessel, (Ret.) U.S. Air Force, Director, Deloitte Consulting
Justin Lombardo, (Ret.) Chief Learning Officer, Baptist Health
Adri Maisonet-Morales, Vice President, Enterprise Learning and Development, Blue Cross Blue Shield of North Carolina
Alan Malinchak, CEO, Éclat Transitions LLC
Lee Maxey, CEO, MindMax
Bob Mosher, Senior Partner and Chief Learning Evangelist, APPLY Synergies
Rebecca Ray, Executive Vice President, The Conference Board
Allison Rossett, (Ret.) Professor of Educational Technology, San Diego State University
Diana Thomas, CEO and Founder, Winning Results
David Vance, Executive Director, Center for Talent Reporting
Kevin D. Wilde, Executive Leadership Fellow, Carlson School of Management, University of Minnesota
James P. Woolsey, President, Defense Aquisition University

Chief Learning Officer (ISSN 1935-8148) is published monthly, except bi-monthly in January/February and July/August by MediaTec Publishing Inc., 111 E. Wacker Dr., Suite 1200, Chicago IL 60601.  Periodicals postage paid at Chicago, IL and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Chief Learning Officer, P.O. Box 8712 Lowell, MA 01853. Subscriptions are free to qualified professionals within the US and Canada. Digital free subscriptions are available worldwide. Nonqualified paid subscriptions are available at the subscription price of $199 for 10 issues. All countries outside the US and Canada must be prepaid in US funds with an additional $33 postage surcharge. Single price copy is $29.99.

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ON THE COVER: PHOTO BY DAVID LUBARSKY

22


Profile

Sarah Fister Gale
At Northwell Health, CLO Kathy Gallo built a world-renowned learning center to help tackle the biggest learning challenges in health care.

60


Case Study

Walter Davis
Temporary power generation supplier Aggreko is using mobile apps to revitalize its learning experience.

62


Business Intelligence

Mike Prokopeak
Spending remains consistent but changing student demographics and talent management needs point to the need for fresh thinking.

Features

18
Soren Eilertsen
To understand engagement, we must first understand human development.
54
Rebecca G. Chandler
Shifting the learning strategy focus from efficiency to agility will allow organizations to adjust swiftly in an uncertain future.

Special Report: Executive Education

42
Sarah Fister Gale
46
Ashley St. John

Special Report: Executive Education

42
Sarah Fister Gale
46
Ashley St. John

Experts

10
Elliott Masie
Try a Learnathon: Crowdsourced UX
12
Jack J. Phillips & Patti P. Phillips
Keep It Simple
14
Ken Blanchard
So You Want to Be a Servant Leader…
16
Lee Maxey
Consider the Unconsidered Worker
66
Tim Rahschulte
The Need for Continuous Learning

Resources

4
The Buck Stops With Education

Are you a part of the CLO Network?

imperatives


Try a Learnathon: Crowdsourced UX

Disrupting traditional models of learning design By Elliott Masie

Elliott Masie is CEO of The Masie Center, an international think tank focused on learning and workplace productivity, and chairman and CLO of The Masie Center’s Learning Consortium.
He can be reached at editor@CLOmedia.com.

W

hile there is widespread interest, dialogue and experimentation in new forms of learning technologies (chatbots, smart speakers, wearables, immersive reality) and new formats of learning content (curated segments, agile module lengths, shoulder-to-shoulder on the job), where are the innovations in new models of learning design?

We can’t create a radically new learning ecosystem if we are simply going to rely on a dusted-off version of ADDIE (analysis, design, development, implementation, evaluation), a more video-rich webinar construction or a more compressed use of a subject matter expert distilled by an instructional designer.

I advocate that our colleagues experiment with a learnathon, a crowdsourced way to create a different approach to teaching, training and supporting skills, competencies or compliance in a workforce setting.

Accountability


Keep It Simple

It’s the best approach to business evaluation By Jack J. Phillips and Patti P. Phillips

Jack J. Phillips is chairman and Patti P. Phillips is president and CEO of the ROI Institute.
They can be reached at editor@CLOmedia.com.

A

s we assist talent development teams in showing the business value of what they do, we often encounter roadblocks, verbalized as, “This is too complicated” or “This will take too much time.” These typically are symptoms of resistance based on myths rather than facts. The process is simple, and we want to keep it that way. Let’s dispel these myths right now.

Myth 1: There is no framework available to show the ROI for every type of learning program.

Fact: More than 5,000 organizations evaluate programs along the five levels of outcomes of our Phillips ROI Methodology. These build on a four-level model created by industrial-organizational psychologist Raymond Katzell in the 1950s and further popularized by Donald Kirkpatrick. So, this is not a new concept. We have modified Katzell’s work to include these levels: reaction, learning, application, impact and ROI. This is a logical chain of value that must exist for any program to have a business connection and a financial contribution.

Myth 2: You cannot sort out the effects of learning.

Fact: While many influences work together in collaboration to produce business impact, senior executives and the sponsor need to know how much goes to a learning program. There are 10 ways to tackle this issue, which can be accomplished with the simplicity of fourth-grade math. To date, more than 5,000 professionals have successfully addressed this task to become Certified ROI Professionals, or CRPs. Without this step, you lose respect among the senior team.

leadership


So You Want to Be a Servant Leader…

Don’t let your ego trip you up By ken blanchard

Ken Blanchard is chief spiritual officer of The Ken Blanchard Cos. and coauthor of “Collaboration Begins with You: Be a Silo Buster.”
He can be reached at editor@CLOmedia.com.

A

s someone who believes servant leadership is the best way to lead, I often get asked what the biggest obstacle is for someone who wants to become a servant leader. Simple: The biggest obstacle in the path to servant leadership is the human ego.

For some people, the letters in ego can stand for “edging good out” or “everything good outside,” where self-serving leaders put themselves first and want to be served by their people. Ego can also stand for “exalting good only,” where leaders with humility put their people first and want to serve and support them.

Making the grade


Consider the Unconsidered Worker

In the struggle for talent, education is key By Lee maxey

Lee Maxey is CEO of MindMax, a marketing and enrollment management services company.
He can be reached at editor@CLOmedia.com.

T

oday’s 20- and 30-somethings, the oft-talked about millennials, attract a lot of attention on the job. But what about the baby boomers and Generation X?

A lack of education may be all that stands in the way of some of these “unconsidered” workers making a big difference in a company. While some boomers are semiretired, many could easily fill complex roles in the workforce if employers entertained that possibility.

According to the Pew Research Center, in the U.S. today there are approximately 73.5 million baby boomers (born 1946 to 1964) and 66 million Gen Xers (born 1965 to 1980) compared with 72 million millennials (born 1981 to 1996). The fact is schools and employers need to be more flexible about what constitutes talent.

To understand engagement, we must first understand human development.

By Soren Eilertsen

From a business perspective, employee engagement is about productivity and outcomes. From an employee perspective, engagement is ultimately about living a full life that actualizes potential and enables individuals to display their true identity, thoughts and feelings. Can these two perspectives be reconciled? The answer is complicated.

Typically, when optimizing for one factor, the other will be suboptimized. Under capitalism, business has traditionally optimized for business results. Some emerging business leaders are challenging this by prioritizing individual development and then setting tough business goals that can act as a pull for individual development toward self-actualization.

To understand engagement, we must first understand human development.

By Soren Eilertsen

From a business perspective, employee engagement is about productivity and outcomes. From an employee perspective, engagement is ultimately about living a full life that actualizes potential and enables individuals to display their true identity, thoughts and feelings. Can these two perspectives be reconciled? The answer is complicated.

Typically, when optimizing for one factor, the other will be suboptimized. Under capitalism, business has traditionally optimized for business results. Some emerging business leaders are challenging this by prioritizing individual development and then setting tough business goals that can act as a pull for individual development toward self-actualization.

Profile


Agent of Change

At Northwell Health, CLO Kathy Gallo built a world-renowned learning center where simulation rooms and debrief sessions help staff tackle the biggest learning challenges in health care.

BY SARAH FISTER GALE

PHOTOS BY DAVID LUBARSKY

When Michael Dowling was promoted to CEO of Northwell Health in 2002, one of his first moves was to lay out plans for a new learning center to support the fast-growing health care network in New York state. He envisioned a corporate campus where the health care system’s now 63,000 employees could take part in continuous learning opportunities and develop the knowledge, skills and experience they needed to help the health care network thrive.

“I have always believed in the importance of creating a culture of continuous learning,” Dowling said. “If you don’t, you will get left behind.”

Creating Consistency

How to Centralize L&D in a Decentralized Organization

By Adina Sapp

How can decentralized organizations effectively implement a centralized learning model? In a spotlight webinar hosted by Cornerstone on Demand on March 14, 2018, Kacie Walters, vice president of strategic programs (human relations) at Northern Trust, tells how her company successfully made the transition. While Cornerstone recognizes that each organization has unique needs and that this path may work for some and not others, Walters has valuable insight on the challenges and benefits of global coordination of goals and values.

The Business Case for Adaptive Learning: Applications Across Industries

McGraw-Hill Education explores how adaptive learning uses neuroscience theories to deliver an
efficient, effective, engaging experience to every learner

By Christina Yu and Geoff Broderick, McGraw-Hill Learning Science Platforms

These days, we can listen to personalized music on the radio, order transit on demand and watch online streams customized to our preferences. Our entertainment and e-commerce experiences are now hyper-optimized. The question then becomes: how can we optimize learning?

McGraw-Hill Education Learning Science Platforms apply artificial intelligence to learning to unlock human potential. The platforms transform static content into dynamically personalized experiences, adapting content to behavior and performance in real time. The result is more efficient, effective and engaging learning.

Several neuroscience theories are embedded in the algorithms that power the personalized learning paths taken on the platforms. Here are some examples.

The Personal, Virtual Touch

How Stanford GSB disrupts the online executive education space

By Tim Harnett

As organizations focus on keeping high-performing leaders in-house, they’ll need to develop them, not only with the skills they need for their role, but also the soft skills needed to manage their teams. The leader-employee relationship is critical to organizational success, especially as people leave managers, not companies. To this end, many organizations target leaders for development in emotional intelligence, situational leadership, communication and collaboration.1 With nearly every industry facing disruption, leaders will also need innovation skills to push their organizations forward.

Hierarchy Is Good, Except When It’s Not

The accountability and information-sharing created by hierarchy is beneficial, but not if status ranks executives as more important and underlings as less valuable

By the Eli Broad College of Business at Michigan State University

Hierarchy isn’t bad, per se. It’s all in what you do with it.

Decisions made at the top are fine, even desirable. But only if people at all levels are respected for their contributions, allowing ideas to rise and fall based on merit.

“Hierarchy has a bad name among organizational leaders right now. You hear a lot about flattening hierarchies and getting rid of hierarchies and layers of management. Some of that is based on the idea that hierarchies are bad for the culture and squash creativity,” said Nicholas Hays, an assistant professor in the Department of Management at Michigan State University’s Eli Broad College of Business.

BY AVE RIO

In times of continuous change, can an array of executive education offerings develop the skills and leadership capabilities of tomorrow?

Dave Weinstein, associate dean of executive education at the Stanford Graduate School of Business, has an MBA from Stanford, which he believes to be a solid foundation for a business education, especially for someone like him. He came from a liberal arts undergraduate program and his first job was in the public sector. He said the concepts of successful business that he learned as part of his MBA program were foundational to the rest of his career.

But Weinstein’s experience was several years ago, and since then the value of an MBA has come into question. “We’re in an interesting world now where opportunity costs to leave the workforce for a year or two are high,” he said.

Executive education options are ever-increasing. To develop leaders today, executives can choose to set up custom courses with an academic institution, give employees freedom for a more self-directed approach, implement a program for certificates, badges and microcredentials or, of course, send employees off to complete the more traditional part-time or full-time MBA program.

Robin Frkal, director of the MBA program at Assumption College in Massachusetts, said an MBA continues to be a valuable degree for anyone who wants to advance in the career of business. She said an MBA gives a breadth of knowledge, which allows people to adapt more quickly to rapidly changing conditions in the marketplace.

Read Full Article

BY AVE RIO

In times of continuous change, can an array of executive education offerings develop the skills and leadership capabilities of tomorrow?

Dave Weinstein, associate dean of executive education at the Stanford Graduate School of Business, has an MBA from Stanford, which he believes to be a solid foundation for a business education, especially for someone like him. He came from a liberal arts undergraduate program and his first job was in the public sector. He said the concepts of successful business that he learned as part of his MBA program were foundational to the rest of his career.

But Weinstein’s experience was several years ago, and since then the value of an MBA has come into question. “We’re in an interesting world now where opportunity costs to leave the workforce for a year or two are high,” he said.

Executive education options are ever-increasing. To develop leaders today, executives can choose to set up custom courses with an academic institution, give employees freedom for a more self-directed approach, implement a program for certificates, badges and microcredentials or, of course, send employees off to complete the more traditional part-time or full-time MBA program.

Robin Frkal, director of the MBA program at Assumption College in Massachusetts, said an MBA continues to be a valuable degree for anyone who wants to advance in the career of business. She said an MBA gives a breadth of knowledge, which allows people to adapt more quickly to rapidly changing conditions in the marketplace.

Read Full Article

How microcredentials, nanodegrees and digital badges help busy executives stay abreast of business trends and on the path of lifelong learning.

By Sarah Fister Gale

In 2016, a team of professors at Coles College of Business at Kennesaw State University spent months converting a series of classroom-based executive education classes into a digital badge program. The courses would be available online, allowing students to complete them in a matter of weeks, for a fraction of the cost of attending classes on campus, and receive a badge certifying they completed the program.

It was an unusual move for a business school that caters to MBA students, admitted Dan Stotz, executive director of executive education programs at the Georgia-based university. He noted that some of his colleagues worried the badges would poach executive candidates, but he believes the content will actually bring in more students. “We aren’t competing with the MBA program, we are competing with nonconsumption of learning.”

Microcredential programs are viewed by many as the next evolution of executive education, providing learning options for busy executives who want to learn but don’t have the time, resources or ambition for a full MBA. “There will always be value in a full MBA, but the microcredential allows busy executives to get a functional background in a specific area like finance or IT,” said Tim Gates, senior regional vice president at Adecco Staffing in Pittsburgh. And with every new credential, they have something new to add to their résumé or LinkedIn profile.

Shaun Walker is one of those busy executives. As co-founder and creative director of HeroFarm, a marketing company in New Orleans, he knew an MBA program would help him expand his company and his personal network, but he couldn’t see himself taking the time away from his business to do a full MBA. Instead, he signed up for Goldman Sachs’ 10,000 Small Businesses, a microdegree program that provides small-business owners with a crash-course style MBA. The free four-month program met two to three times a week, giving participants a similar — if abbreviated — experience to an executive MBA. Walker learned the basics of business and finance within a cohort of local peers, who continue to network and support each other as their companies grow. “I got a ton of valuable knowledge and contacts, and I didn’t have to go into debt to get it,” he said.

Read Full Article

How microcredentials, nanodegrees and digital badges help busy executives stay abreast of business trends and on the path of lifelong learning.

By Sarah Fister Gale

In 2016, a team of professors at Coles College of Business at Kennesaw State University spent months converting a series of classroom-based executive education classes into a digital badge program. The courses would be available online, allowing students to complete them in a matter of weeks, for a fraction of the cost of attending classes on campus, and receive a badge certifying they completed the program.

It was an unusual move for a business school that caters to MBA students, admitted Dan Stotz, executive director of executive education programs at the Georgia-based university. He noted that some of his colleagues worried the badges would poach executive candidates, but he believes the content will actually bring in more students. “We aren’t competing with the MBA program, we are competing with nonconsumption of learning.”

Microcredential programs are viewed by many as the next evolution of executive education, providing learning options for busy executives who want to learn but don’t have the time, resources or ambition for a full MBA. “There will always be value in a full MBA, but the microcredential allows busy executives to get a functional background in a specific area like finance or IT,” said Tim Gates, senior regional vice president at Adecco Staffing in Pittsburgh. And with every new credential, they have something new to add to their résumé or LinkedIn profile.

Shaun Walker is one of those busy executives. As co-founder and creative director of HeroFarm, a marketing company in New Orleans, he knew an MBA program would help him expand his company and his personal network, but he couldn’t see himself taking the time away from his business to do a full MBA. Instead, he signed up for Goldman Sachs’ 10,000 Small Businesses, a microdegree program that provides small-business owners with a crash-course style MBA. The free four-month program met two to three times a week, giving participants a similar — if abbreviated — experience to an executive MBA. Walker learned the basics of business and finance within a cohort of local peers, who continue to network and support each other as their companies grow. “I got a ton of valuable knowledge and contacts, and I didn’t have to go into debt to get it,” he said.

BY ASHLEY ST. JOHN

A higher education veteran talks about what’s changed, what hasn’t and what’s next in the executive education space.

As technology evolves and increasingly digital-savvy generations move up in the workplace, questions dominate the executive education space. How should executive education be changing to meet the needs of digital generations? What’s the value of a microcredential versus an MBA? Is the more traditional, face-to-face model being threatened by alternate offerings?

According to Daniel Szpiro, dean of the School of Professional Programs at Marist College in Poughkeepsie, New York, while executive education is a moving landscape, the value of more traditional offerings hasn’t been compromised.

“Even if there’s opportunity for some hybridization, people still, when it comes to leadership skills, tend to gravitate toward a more traditional setting,” Szpiro said.

Szpiro’s career in executive education and continuing education spans more than two decades. Before joining Marist College in 2016, he was dean of the Jack Welch Management Institute, part of Strayer University. He also served as the associate dean of executive education at the Samuel Curtis Johnson Graduate School of Management at Cornell University. Before coming to the United States, he was the director of the executive MBA programs at Queen’s University in Kingston, Ontario. Here, he shares some of his insights.

BY ASHLEY ST. JOHN

A higher education veteran talks about what’s changed, what hasn’t and what’s next in the executive education space.

As technology evolves and increasingly digital-savvy generations move up in the workplace, questions dominate the executive education space. How should executive education be changing to meet the needs of digital generations? What’s the value of a microcredential versus an MBA? Is the more traditional, face-to-face model being threatened by alternate offerings?

According to Daniel Szpiro, dean of the School of Professional Programs at Marist College in Poughkeepsie, New York, while executive education is a moving landscape, the value of more traditional offerings hasn’t been compromised.

“Even if there’s opportunity for some hybridization, people still, when it comes to leadership skills, tend to gravitate toward a more traditional setting,” Szpiro said.

Szpiro’s career in executive education and continuing education spans more than two decades. Before joining Marist College in 2016, he was dean of the Jack Welch Management Institute, part of Strayer University. He also served as the associate dean of executive education at the Samuel Curtis Johnson Graduate School of Management at Cornell University. Before coming to the United States, he was the director of the executive MBA programs at Queen’s University in Kingston, Ontario. Here, he shares some of his insights.

All work and no play makes for dull workers. It also can lead to an organization ripe for failure. Daniel Cable, London Business School professor and author of “Alive at Work: The Neuroscience of Helping Your People Love What They Do” has the antidote to the organizational blues. Drawing on work with a wide range of organizations including the Make-A-Wish Foundation, Standard Chartered Bank and Google, he shows that small changes can have a powerful effect on our approach to work. In his keynote address at the Fall 2018 Chief Learning Officer Symposium, Cable will lay out how leaders can make a meaningful impact on their organizational culture and help their employees reach their full potential.

WHAT INSPIRED THE CONCEPT BEHIND YOUR BOOK “ALIVE AT WORK” AND WHY DID YOU DECIDE TO WRITE IT?

First, I watched my own enthusiasm and zest toward my own job as a professor slip into dull routine. Without realizing it, I nurtured an achievement mindset rather than a learning mindset. It’s not pretty but it can happen to any of us, even if you have a good job with lots of autonomy.

Shifting the learning strategy focus from efficiency to agility will allow organizations to adjust swiftly in an uncertain future.

BY REBECCA G. CHANDLER

The future of work is one of the most widely discussed topics by senior executives across all industries. A mere internet search on the subject will pull up 238,000,000 results, more than 70 business books, countless conferences, and too many podcasts and blog posts to count. I have a few out there myself. I believe this is the topic du jour because organizations are desperately trying to find the crystal ball that will enable them not only to stay ahead of their competition, but also enter into new markets and beat new competitors.

I was recently asked what a leading-edge learning strategy might look like in the next five years. Many learning strategies today are focused on transforming the company into a “learning organization.” A learning organization, as introduced by author and MIT lecturer Peter Senge, is one that continuously facilitates learning for its people and transforms as needed. Key characteristics of a learning organization are systems thinking, challenging the status quo, continued growth for teams and individuals, and common understanding of a shared vision. All these things are still relevant and needed, but it isn’t enough for an organization to just become a learning organization; it also needs to rethink how it is organized.

Shifting the learning strategy focus from efficiency to agility will allow organizations to adjust swiftly in an uncertain future.

BY REBECCA G. CHANDLER

The future of work is one of the most widely discussed topics by senior executives across all industries. A mere internet search on the subject will pull up 238,000,000 results, more than 70 business books, countless conferences, and too many podcasts and blog posts to count. I have a few out there myself. I believe this is the topic du jour because organizations are desperately trying to find the crystal ball that will enable them not only to stay ahead of their competition, but also enter into new markets and beat new competitors.

I was recently asked what a leading-edge learning strategy might look like in the next five years. Many learning strategies today are focused on transforming the company into a “learning organization.” A learning organization, as introduced by author and MIT lecturer Peter Senge, is one that continuously facilitates learning for its people and transforms as needed. Key characteristics of a learning organization are systems thinking, challenging the status quo, continued growth for teams and individuals, and common understanding of a shared vision. All these things are still relevant and needed, but it isn’t enough for an organization to just become a learning organization; it also needs to rethink how it is organized.

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Case Study


A Mobile-Powered Learning Makeover

BY WALTER DAVIS

T

here was a time when Aggreko didn’t allow employees to take out their mobile phones during technical training sessions. However, in an effort to transition from being a training-focused organization to a learning-focused organization, we have embraced mobile apps as a fundamental part of Aggreko’s “Be Your Future” learning program.

With the understanding that collecting certificates and building compliance won’t be enough for the challenges ahead, we are focusing on delivering a dynamic learning approach to support high-performing teams. “Be Your Future” embodies continuous learning to enable our employees to efficiently overcome obstacles they’re facing in the moment and be innovative and adaptable to the requirements and pace that our customers demand.

Business Intelligence


Change on the Horizon for Executive Education

Spending levels remain consistent. However, changing student demographics and talent management needs point to the necessity for fresh thinking.

By Mike Prokopeak

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xecutive education remains a widespread development tool, popular with the learning departments that fund that education and well-liked by the individuals who go through the programs.

According to a 2017 survey of 1,665 early to midcareer professionals, 60 percent say they are very likely or extremely likely to pursue a master’s degree in management. Further data from that study, conducted by AACSB, an association of business schools, EMBAC, a council of executive MBA programs, and UNICON, a consortium of executive education providers, show that half of them plan to pursue a specialized graduate degree (Figure 1).

in conclusion


The Need for Continuous Learning

Our knowledge has an increasingly limited shelf life By Tim Rahschulte

Tim Rahschulte is former CLO of Evanta, current CEO at the Professional Development Academy and professor of business at George Fox University. He is co-author of “My Best Advice: Proven Rules For Effective Leadership.”
He can be reached at editor@CLOmedia.com.

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everal years ago, Jeff Immelt, former chairman and CEO at General Electric, gave a lecture at Stanford University. During his lecture, he directed a point to the students, but it was just as important for the faculty and administrative leadership gathered to hear as well: “The things you’re learning while you’re here are going to be pretty irrelevant relatively soon.”

Immelt’s point was not about the irrelevance of a Stanford education; rather, he was noting the need for lifelong continuous learning.

Immelt is not the only one noticing the need for continual learning. His predecessor, Jack Welch, famously said, “An organization’s ability to learn, and translate that learning into action rapidly, is the greatest competitive advantage.” Samuel Arbesman, a senior scholar at the Kauffman Foundation and a research fellow at the Institute for Quantitative Social Science at Harvard University, wrote about it in his book, “The Half-Life of Facts: Why Everything We Know Has an Expiration Date.” Thirty years prior, systems theorist and architect Buckminster Fuller detailed the Knowledge Doubling Curve in his book, “The Critical Path.”

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