Chief Learning Officer
July/August 2019

Editor’s Letter


Time to Sing Loud
Mike Prokopeak Editor in Chief
B

ig shifts are an opportunity to do big things. That’s the optimist point of view on change. But it’s not just a matter of opinion or difference in perspective.

Change happens regardless of our intentions and despite our best efforts otherwise. Change is ignorant of our lifelong hopes and dreams. The world keeps turning, the economy goes up and down and what’s new becomes old. When you look at it with clear eyes, optimism is really the only option. You can’t control many things but you can control how you respond.

That’s not to say it’s easy to be an optimist. In technology and science, it’s fashionable to take the pessimistic view. The evidence is all around. Rather than bring us together, social media has deepened divisions. Artificial intelligence threatens to automate us out of a living.

JULY/AUGUST 2019 | Volume 18, Issue 6

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CLO Contents June 2019
The new CLO of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s National Weather Service is taking learning to the masses.
The new CLO of the National Weather Service is taking learning to the masses.
on the cover: Photo by Paul Andrews

10


Pamay Bassey of Kraft Heinz shares her journey to CLO; the Center for Talent Reporting’s David Vance says we need to change the conversation around funding measurement; and people share what they’re reading these days.
34


Profile

Sarah Fister Gale
The new CLO of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s National Weather Service is taking learning to the masses.

52


Case Study

Agatha Bordonaro
State Farm partners with Bright Horizons EdAssist to reap real rewards from its tuition reimbursement program.

54


Business Intelligence

Ashley St. John
Digital disruption leads the charge for change in executive education.

CLO Contents June 2019
Power Up Your L&D Partnerships
Power Up Your L&D Partnerships
Digital Degrees and Flexibility
The Experiential Leader
Designing for Results
The Experiential Leader
Designing for Results

Feature

22
Stephen L. Cohen and Kevin D. Wilde
Client organizations and suppliers must make a concerted effort that involves commitment, communication, credibility, clarity, cadence and collaboration.
Special Report:
Executive Education in 2019
40
Sarah Fister Gale
The workplace is evolving and executive education must adapt.
44
Sarah Fister Gale
How immersive learning is changing the way leaders develop.
48
Jack J. Phillips and Patti P. Phillips
It is rare for executive education programs to start with the business need. But they could, and, with some programs, they should.

Experts

16
Michael E. Echols
The Strategic Elements of Learning
17
Bob Mosher
Standing Still Is No Longer an Option
18
Ken Blanchard
Leading the 4 Stages of Team Development
20
Lee Maxey
Tackling Employee Student Debt
58
John Ambrose
The Language Learning Blind Spot

Resources

4
Time to Sing Loud
Your Career


Your Career


Career Advice From

Pamay Bassey

Chief Learning Officer, The Kraft Heinz Co.

Ekpedeme “Pamay” Bassey, chief learning officer for The Kraft Heinz Co., shares her career journey and what she has learned along the way.
Career Advice from Kathleen Gallo
Pamay BasseyHow did you begin your career in learning?

I studied artificial intelligence in college. After graduating, I found a graduate program that focused on taking AI research and what we know about how the mind works and how we process information and applying it to create innovative and engaging learning experiences. It was sponsored by then Andersen Consulting (now Accenture), and my career in learning was born there as a consultant.

What attracted you to learning and development?

Recently, I read a Forbes article by computer scientist Jim Spohrer, in which he recounted a conversation he had with Elliot Soloway, a professor at University of Michigan. Professor Soloway asked Jim why he was studying AI, and Jim replied he wanted to make machines smarter. To which Soloway replied, “Seems like it might be a better goal to make people smarter with the help of AI.” This changed Jim’s focus going forward.

Pamay Bassey answers our rapid-fire questions.
The most important part of learning is:
Take responsibility for it. Own your own learning and development. Learn like an owner. Seek out high-impact learning experiences, and once you read an article or take a course, find ways to apply it in your day-to-day so the information becomes a part of you. If you approach life and your career as a lifelong learner, it will serve you well.
If you approach life and your career as a lifelong learner, it will serve you well.
The most overrated trend in L&D is:
I am not a big fan of gamification, but I know that it works for others, so I try to keep an open mind because it is all about the learners, not about me!
Your Career


Your Career


What Are You Reading?
Made to Stick: Why Some Ideas Survive and Others Die
Made to Stick: Why Some Ideas Survive and Others Die
By Chip and Dan Heath
I’ve always been someone who isn’t afraid to stand in front of a crowd, but recently I decided to take some time to really develop how I deliver messages, make a pitch and “sell” my ideas. I’m learning that in order for me to be able to sell my ideas, I’ve got to tighten my elevator pitch, and if I want my message to be memorable, I’ve got to make it simple. This book does a great job of breaking out six characteristics that make an idea “sticky.” I’m really looking forward to putting these learnings in place in my professional and personal life.
Dania Shaheen Gutterson
— Dania Shaheen Gutterson, vice president of strategy and people operations, Kazoo HR
Your Career


Your Career


Top of Mind
Talk Management, Not Measurement By David Vance
David Vance, executive director of the Center for Talent Reporting, says we need to change the conversation around funding measurement.
David Vance - Center For Talent Reporting
David Vance - Center For Talent Reporting

The profession continues to struggle to get budget and attention for more robust measurement strategies. Learning professionals, particularly those with measurement or analytics responsibilities, appreciate the value of measurement and know that further budget would be well spent but often cannot convince senior leaders in learning to make the investment, let alone senior leaders outside learning. So, how do we make the case for more resources?

My advice is that we don’t. Instead, we take a stealth approach. While some senior leaders will readily see the reason for more robust measurement, in my experience, most will not. Senior leaders always have many more requests for budget and staff than they can grant, and typically measurement, by itself, does not rise to the top of the priority list. And since you are already providing learning, measurement seems like an “add-on” or a “nice-to-have,” not something that is essential.

BUSINESS IMPACT


The Strategic Elements of Learning
Strategic learning is about the why By Michael E. Echols
Michael E. Echols is principal and founder of Human Capital LLC

Michael E. Echols is principal and founder of Human Capital LLC and author of “Your Future Is Calling.”
He can be reached at editor@CLOmedia.com.

W

e are in the midst of titanic shifts in how we buy and sell, how we manage our health, how we move from here to there, and how, what, where and why we learn. The strategic learning is about the why.

It is human nature to look backward to try to understand both the present and the future. The current digital revolution is such a case. What is especially challenging about digital is how fast it is happening, and how broad its reach.

Corporate digital deployment can be viewed as an “add-on” to assets and strategies that already exist — i.e., assets brought forward from the past. Here, I’ll point to Walmart to show you what I mean.

selling up, selling down


Standing Still Is No Longer an Option
Workflow learning is the brave new frontier BY BOB MOSHER
Chief Learning Officer author, Bob Mosher headshot.
Bob Mosher is a senior partner and chief learning evangelist for APPLY Synergies, a strategic consulting firm. He can be reached at editor@CLOmedia.com.
A

s many of you know, I’ve been at this for a long time — 36 years to be exact. I have seen some amazing changes in L&D during that time. I remember standing in front of a group of trainers showing them how we could “transform” their classrooms by putting all of their transparencies into a new tool called PowerPoint. Those days are long gone, and we have been through huge transformations since. And if we thought PowerPoint, the internet or e-learning were transformational and challenging, we haven’t seen anything yet.

Why? Because the next big change strikes at the heart of how we’ve defined ourselves since our inception. You see, even with the transformational modalities and tools I’ve described, the locus of control was still squarely in our domain. We were still creating a learning solution that was a training-first deliverable. It focused more on knowledge and skills gain than on workflow application. Clearly, we hoped that some type of transfer occurred, but the journey started with our deliverables, which were created and maintained in our design shops, and were delivered via our platforms and trainers, be them live or digital. Those times are changing dramatically, if they haven’t already. The question is — are we ready?

LEADERSHIP


Leading the 4 Stages of Team Development
Teams are the engine to productivity BY KEN BLANCHARD
Chief Learning Officer author, Ken Blanchard's headshot.
Ken Blanchard is chief spiritual officer of The Ken Blanchard Cos. and co-author of “Servant Leadership in Action.” He can be reached at editor@CLOmedia.com.
W

ant to make something happen in your organization? Give the job to a team.

The top-down, traditional management hierarchy — too slow to meet the demands of today’s market — continues to disappear. In its place, teams have become the preferred strategy for getting work done. With greater flexibility and access to resources, teams can achieve rapid results in ways that bureaucracies cannot.

In our latest Blanchard research, done in partnership with Training magazine, we learned that people spend more than half their work time in teams. Yet only 27 percent of the respondents felt that their teams were high performing.

A high-performance team relies on the contributions of many individuals rather than the talents of one high achiever. To give a recent example, last year the Los Angeles Lakers recruited LeBron James, arguably one of the best basketball players of all time. But as the Lakers are finding out, just because you have a superstar on your team doesn’t mean you’re going to win championships — or even get to the playoffs. Citing bad chemistry and lack of cohesion, The Guardian declared in a March 2019 headline that “the Lakers are a dumpster fire not even LeBron James can extinguish.”

Making the grade


Tackling Employee Student Debt

What should be the employer’s role? BY LEE MAXEY

Lee Maxey, CEO of MindMax

Lee Maxey is CEO of MindMax, a marketing and enrollment management services company.
He can be reached at editor@CLOmedia.com.

S

tudents will be heading back to school in another month or so, and along with the excitement of a new school year comes the stress of figuring out how to pay for it. Federal student loan interest rates have been on the rise, up from 3.76 percent in 2016-17 to 5.05 percent for the 2018-19 school year. Interest rate hikes may be leveling off. But the number of people behind on paying back their student loans has grown to 20 percent, up slightly from 19 percent in 2016 and 18 percent in 2015, according to the Federal Reserve.

Imagine the stress it causes parents and graduates alike to know they will have debt hanging over them for decades. Last fall, the U.S. Department of Education released data showing only 50 percent of students attending college during the 1995-96 academic year had paid off their loans within two decades. In spite of what a student might’ve studied in college and which employer could be an ideal fit, graduates are increasingly forced to think about choosing the best-paying job available to manage student loan debt. I’m not arguing for or against the value of college for all, but at the forefront of decision-making these days, high schoolers and their parents are very much making choices about postsecondary education vis-a-vis debt.

The Power of Learning-Focused Leadership Title

Client organizations and suppliers must make a concerted effort that involves commitment, communication, credibility, clarity, cadence and collaboration.

By Stephen L. Cohen and Kevin D. Wilde

“How in the world did you pull that off?”

Peggy and Jim were used to this question as they would recount the successful partnership that produced a series of award-winning talent development programs. As head of talent management for her company, Peggy would often start by saying the bottom-line results speak for themselves but would add that forging a great external partnership mattered as well. And Jim — the external senior consultant assigned to Peggy’s company — would quickly add that he wished more client engagements looked like this. Both would agree the partnership had the kind of power lacking in most internal/external relationships in the talent development field today.

The Power of Learning-Focused Leadership Title

Client organizations and suppliers must make a concerted effort that involves commitment, communication, credibility, clarity, cadence and collaboration.

By Stephen L. Cohen and Kevin D. Wilde

“How in the world did you pull that off?”

Peggy and Jim were used to this question as they would recount the successful partnership that produced a series of award-winning talent development programs. As head of talent management for her company, Peggy would often start by saying the bottom-line results speak for themselves but would add that forging a great external partnership mattered as well. And Jim — the external senior consultant assigned to Peggy’s company — would quickly add that he wished more client engagements looked like this. Both would agree the partnership had the kind of power lacking in most internal/external relationships in the talent development field today.

Power Up Your L&D Partnerships
Sponsored Content
Sponsored Content
Cost-Effective Corporate Reading
A guide to engagement, critical thinking and cross-team collaboration
By Adina Sapp

It’s widely known that reading contributes to the overall intelligence, communication skills and knowledge of individuals, giving people advantages both personally and professionally. Many business leaders attribute their success to regular reading. For example, Bill Gates publishes an annual suggested reading list1 and Warren Buffett spends up to 80% of his day reading.2

Reading can also contribute to group success on the corporate level by driving engagement, critical thinking and cross-team collaboration. And fortunately for budget-pressed L&D leaders, corporate reading programs are budget friendly, versatile and customizable to business needs. Books can be incorporated into meetings, conferences and events, to support new-hire onboarding or career development workshops.

Sponsored Content
Sponsored Content
The Power of Data Fluency
By Adina Sapp
Data Science and Decision Support
Though the role of the data scientist barely existed five years ago, it has now risen to the top of the job market in terms of demand.1 Data scientists can interpret data to create meaningful stories, forecast trends and generate information that drives organizational improvement.

Research shows that data-driven organizations are three times more likely to report significant improvements in decision-making2, and many that have not already invested in data analytics are looking to do so. For some, this means hiring data scientists and investing in big data tools that collect, aggregate, integrate and analyze data from multiple systems.

Because data scientists typically command a base salary of more than $100,000, however, not all organizations can afford to hire these professionals or create a dedicated data science team.3 The organizations with the resources to do so must determine the most effective data team structure for their company.

Sponsored Content
Sponsored Content
Talent Activation
Unpacking Skills Throughout the Employment Lifecycle
By Adina Sapp

With unemployment rates at record lows, employers are looking to strategically capture the untapped skills of their current workforce rather than seeking new talent elsewhere. The year 2018 closed with an unemployment rate of 3.9% — the lowest it’s been since 2000. Prior to 2000, the rate hadn’t been that low since 1969.1 Business growth is difficult when the unemployment rate is this low. Companies looking to expand their workforce have difficulty finding good workers because the talent simply isn’t available.

Even when new talent can be found, hiring and firing is expensive. As Mike Prokopeak, editor in chief of Chief Learning Officer, put it, “It has always been more expensive to find talent to fill gaps. It may be more advantageous to develop the people who are already in your workforce.” The law of supply and demand means it is difficult to find good employees, and so employers want to retain the ones they have and provide them with the skills the company needs.

Profile


The Weather Man
The new CLO of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s National Weather Service is taking learning to the masses.
By Sarah Fister Gale
John Ogren
John Ogren didn’t aspire to become a learning leader. He wanted to be a meteorologist.

As a boy he recalls a tornado coming through his community. “It had a huge impact on me as a young lad,” he said. From that point on he was fascinated with weather — and how to protect the community from these kinds of events.

In college he studied meteorology, and he landed his first job with the National Weather Service in Appalachia in 2002. He’s been moving up the ranks ever since.

Ogren honed his skills tracking tornadoes in the Midwest and was later promoted to warning coordinator at the NWS office in Wichita, Kansas. In that role he got to interface with public leaders, emergency management agencies, the Red Cross and other disaster organizations to help them prepare for storm events and keep their communities safe. At the time, NWS was moving in to a new digital era, installing Doppler radar, new satellites and other technology that enhanced its ability to predict weather, and Ogren was at the forefront. “I loved monitoring storms and tornadoes and issuing warnings that would protect lives,” he said.

Symposium Logo
Q&A with Priya Parker
Symposium Logo
Q&A with Priya Parker
Priya Parker’s bold approach to gatherings redefines the ways people connect, learn and develop relationships. As the founder of boutique advisory firm Thrive Labsshe helps activists, elected officials, corporate executives, educators and philanthropists create transformative, unforgettable gatherings that allow them to step back from their daily routines, rediscover their motivations and develop strategies for innovation.

What influenced you to write your book?

For far too long we’ve been told that gatherings are about getting the things right: the logistics, the venue, the food, the tech. However, I wanted to write a book that put people back at the center of our gatherings. I wanted to write a leadership book that reminded leaders that gathering the intentional bringing together of three or more people for a purpose is a fundamental unit of power.

Digital Degrees and Flexibility
By Sarah Fister Gale | Art by Maxwell Cooper
T he days of sending rising young executives to an MBA program and then considering them fully trained are virtually over. Today’s leaders are expected to be lifelong learners, which means they need constant access to fast and cost-effective development programs that build on their skills and abilities while allowing them to expand their network of peers.

“The nature of leadership skills is changing so quickly that a lot of organizations no longer believe traditional education can stay the pace,” said Michael Griffiths, lead for Deloitte’s Learning Consulting Practice in New York. “Leaders need programs that enable them to more rapidly change their skills.”

This doesn’t mean the MBA has lost its value. “Business schools are trying to be more nimble, offering digital degrees and flexible consumption models,” he said. But with so many options, they are now viewed as just one of many learning steps a leader might choose to take.

In many cases, companies are looking for faster and more future-focused programs that will prepare leaders for the changing nature of work. In Deloitte’s “2019 Human Capital Trends” report, the top-rated requirement for leaders was the ability to lead through more complexity and ambiguity, and almost half of respondents (47 percent) felt their leaders needed to learn how to manage a workforce that is a combination of humans and machines.

Yet companies are struggling to figure out how to accommodate these needs. Only 30 percent of organizations say they are effectively developing their leaders to meet these challenges. “There is a lot of unease about leadership and learning,” Griffiths said.

Digital Degrees and Flexibility
By Sarah Fister Gale | Art by Maxwell Cooper
T he days of sending rising young executives to an MBA program and then considering them fully trained are virtually over. Today’s leaders are expected to be lifelong learners, which means they need constant access to fast and cost-effective development programs that build on their skills and abilities while allowing them to expand their network of peers.

“The nature of leadership skills is changing so quickly that a lot of organizations no longer believe traditional education can stay the pace,” said Michael Griffiths, lead for Deloitte’s Learning Consulting Practice in New York. “Leaders need programs that enable them to more rapidly change their skills.”

This doesn’t mean the MBA has lost its value. “Business schools are trying to be more nimble, offering digital degrees and flexible consumption models,” he said. But with so many options, they are now viewed as just one of many learning steps a leader might choose to take.

In many cases, companies are looking for faster and more future-focused programs that will prepare leaders for the changing nature of work. In Deloitte’s “2019 Human Capital Trends” report, the top-rated requirement for leaders was the ability to lead through more complexity and ambiguity, and almost half of respondents (47 percent) felt their leaders needed to learn how to manage a workforce that is a combination of humans and machines.

Yet companies are struggling to figure out how to accommodate these needs. Only 30 percent of organizations say they are effectively developing their leaders to meet these challenges. “There is a lot of unease about leadership and learning,” Griffiths said.

Digital Degrees and Flexibility
By Sarah Fister Gale | Art by Maxwell Cooper
T he days of sending rising young executives to an MBA program and then considering them fully trained are virtually over. Today’s leaders are expected to be lifelong learners, which means they need constant access to fast and cost-effective development programs that build on their skills and abilities while allowing them to expand their network of peers.

“The nature of leadership skills is changing so quickly that a lot of organizations no longer believe traditional education can stay the pace,” said Michael Griffiths, lead for Deloitte’s Learning Consulting Practice in New York. “Leaders need programs that enable them to more rapidly change their skills.”

This doesn’t mean the MBA has lost its value. “Business schools are trying to be more nimble, offering digital degrees and flexible consumption models,” he said. But with so many options, they are now viewed as just one of many learning steps a leader might choose to take.

In many cases, companies are looking for faster and more future-focused programs that will prepare leaders for the changing nature of work. In Deloitte’s “2019 Human Capital Trends” report, the top-rated requirement for leaders was the ability to lead through more complexity and ambiguity, and almost half of respondents (47 percent) felt their leaders needed to learn how to manage a workforce that is a combination of humans and machines.

Yet companies are struggling to figure out how to accommodate these needs. Only 30 percent of organizations say they are effectively developing their leaders to meet these challenges. “There is a lot of unease about leadership and learning,” Griffiths said.

The Experiential Leader
By Sarah Fister Gale
Art by Maxwell Cooper
If you are thinking about attending an executive education course this year, be prepared to have a lot of choices. Today’s crop of executive education options offer a vast range of topics, formats and learning channels, most of which are designed to help learners transform their leadership style for a more digitally driven workplace.

This is good news, as recent research suggests that executives need a lot more education to keep up with the rapidly changing workplace. Executive Development Associates’ “2019 Trends in Executive Development” report determined that “digital culture shock” is driving most of the interest and evolution in executive education today as leaders seek new knowledge and skills to help them adapt. Changing business strategy (34 percent) and digital transformation related to AI, analytics, blockchain and other technologies (22 percent) were cited as the most influential issues facing executives today.

These pressures are changing the kinds of content that executives — and the learning organizations that are paying for their education — are seeking, said Michael Chavez, CEO of Duke Corporate Education. “Strategy courses have become a lot less relevant in the shadow of disruption,” he said. They are rapidly being replaced by content and modalities that challenge leaders to think differently and to engage more fully in the learning process.

The Experiential Leader
By Sarah Fister Gale
Art by Maxwell Cooper
If you are thinking about attending an executive education course this year, be prepared to have a lot of choices. Today’s crop of executive education options offer a vast range of topics, formats and learning channels, most of which are designed to help learners transform their leadership style for a more digitally driven workplace.

This is good news, as recent research suggests that executives need a lot more education to keep up with the rapidly changing workplace. Executive Development Associates’ “2019 Trends in Executive Development” report determined that “digital culture shock” is driving most of the interest and evolution in executive education today as leaders seek new knowledge and skills to help them adapt. Changing business strategy (34 percent) and digital transformation related to AI, analytics, blockchain and other technologies (22 percent) were cited as the most influential issues facing executives today.

These pressures are changing the kinds of content that executives — and the learning organizations that are paying for their education — are seeking, said Michael Chavez, CEO of Duke Corporate Education. “Strategy courses have become a lot less relevant in the shadow of disruption,” he said. They are rapidly being replaced by content and modalities that challenge leaders to think differently and to engage more fully in the learning process.

Designing For Results
By Jack J. Phillips and Patti P. Phillips
Art by Maxwell Cooper
Imagine you are an executive education provider at a prestigious business school. You have some of the most respected faculty in the world, with great content, innovative design, and participants from some of the most admired and respected organizations attending your programs regularly. The feedback from your reaction questionnaires is awesome. The participants love your material and the experience you provide. Clearly, this program is successful — right?

Now, let’s suppose your participants leave this program and never do anything with what they’ve learned. With no application of content, there is no impact on their work, their community or their families. If this occurred — no application and no impact — would you still consider your program successful?

This is a tough question. But for the executive education sponsors, those who pay for it, the clear answer is “no,” your program is not successful. As an executive education provider, you could say, “We gave them a great program and we know they learned powerful content. It is up to the participants to make it work. It’s out of our control.”

This creates a dilemma for executive education. To be successful in the eyes of those who pay for it, usually the top and senior executives, it must add value to the organization. That often means moving beyond classic behavior change measurement, usually evaluated through 360-degree feedback. The new challenge is for program providers to address the issue of application and impact up front and not wait to be pulled into these issues by the client.

Designing For Results
By Jack J. Phillips and Patti P. Phillips
Art by Maxwell Cooper
Imagine you are an executive education provider at a prestigious business school. You have some of the most respected faculty in the world, with great content, innovative design, and participants from some of the most admired and respected organizations attending your programs regularly. The feedback from your reaction questionnaires is awesome. The participants love your material and the experience you provide. Clearly, this program is successful — right?

Now, let’s suppose your participants leave this program and never do anything with what they’ve learned. With no application of content, there is no impact on their work, their community or their families. If this occurred — no application and no impact — would you still consider your program successful?

This is a tough question. But for the executive education sponsors, those who pay for it, the clear answer is “no,” your program is not successful. As an executive education provider, you could say, “We gave them a great program and we know they learned powerful content. It is up to the participants to make it work. It’s out of our control.”

This creates a dilemma for executive education. To be successful in the eyes of those who pay for it, usually the top and senior executives, it must add value to the organization. That often means moving beyond classic behavior change measurement, usually evaluated through 360-degree feedback. The new challenge is for program providers to address the issue of application and impact up front and not wait to be pulled into these issues by the client.

Designing For Results

Case Study


A Bright Future for State Farm
By Agatha Bordonaro
F

or an organization like State Farm, recruiting and retaining the best and brightest is more than aspirational — it’s mission critical. Holding more than 83 million insurance policies, selling about 100 different products and processing more than 39,000 claims a day, State Farm insures more homes, cars and watercraft than any other insurance company in the United States. And its more than 58,000 employees are the ones keeping that motor running. Not only must they be skilled at their jobs, but they also must be invested in the organization to ensure everything moves smoothly.

On top of that, around 10 years ago State Farm began to focus on employee count in larger metropolitan areas, where it was competing with other big employers.

“We were opening huge facilities — in large part call centers — with many IT employees in three major hubs in the south,” said Jeff Yerington, manager of industry education and tuition reimbursement for State Farm. “We were starting to have more and more issues with hiring and retaining these employees.”

Business Intelligence


Top-Down Tinkering From the Ground Up
Executive education is expecting change thanks to the ever-present spector of digital disruption.
By Ashley St. John
A

t the root of so many organizational and societal shifts lies digital disruption. Executive education, it seems, is no exception.

It remains a popular development tool among learning departments — in fact, 56 percent of learning leaders anticipate their total spending on leadership development and executive education increasing in the next 12 months, according to data from the Chief Learning Officer Business Intelligence Board’s “2019 Learning State of the Industry” report (Figure 1). A mere 4 percent anticipate a decrease in spending. Additionally, almost 71 percent report their organizations spend at least $1,000 annually per person on executive education (Figure 2).

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In Conclusion


The Language Learning Blind Spot

Make language learning your fifth learning pillar By JOHN AMBROSE

John Ambrose

John Ambrose, former head of strategy for Skillsoft and founder of Books24x7, is president — North America and chief strategy officer of goFluent. He can be reached at editor@CLOmedia.com.

L

earning programs and leaders come in all shapes and sizes. However, one thing many have in common, especially in English-speaking countries, is a blind spot around the strategic value of language learning.

Let’s face it, the charter of global learning and development is pretty clear: Define learning priorities, ensure they are aligned with the business and provide a global platform to execute. Today, four major enterprise “learning pillars” exist in almost every company: IT skills, business skills, leadership skills and compliance. It’s time for language learning to be elevated as the fifth pillar.

If you hear any of the following three phrases in your organization, language learning could be a blind spot.

Thanks for reading our July/August 2019 issue!