June 2018

June 2018

DuPont Sustainable Solutions

Learning & Development

Microlearning’s Big Impact on Safety Training

Providing safety training in short bursts may help workers retain critical safety knowledge and procedures.

“Conjunction Junction, what’s your function?” is a phrase recognized by many American adults whose childhood spanned any part of the 1970s. This phrase was part of an initiative to weave the educational program “Schoolhouse Rock” into children’s Saturday morning television entertainment. Because of these efforts, almost 40 years later many adults who heard that phrase in their childhood can today not only recall what conjunctions are, but also how to use them in the English language and even cite some examples.

This is an excellent example of the effectiveness of what commonly is known as microlearning. While the brevity and catchy tune associated with “Conjunction Junction” are key elements to the success and longevity of this learning, the concept behind “Conjunction Junction” also is an example of a theoretically sound application of educational psychology. There has been a growing amount of attention paid to the concept of microlearning recently, particularly as it relates to safety training. What makes it different? What makes it effective? How does it stand up to educational psychology?

Editor’s Letter


Taking a Break for Learning

L

iving in a world that is constantly on is tiring. Instead of meaningful milestones, life more often feels like an endless series of appointments.

To add insult to injury, we’re simply not getting enough rest to cope with it all. Fed by flashy smartphones and addictive apps, we are in the midst of a sleep crisis. According to analysis by the Rand Corporation, our collective lack of sleep is costing $411 billion in the U.S. economy alone. We stay up too late answering emails, checking off to-do lists, responding to texts and mindlessly surfing the internet.

The consequence is rising health care costs and higher disengagement at work. But it’s also taking a big bite out of our ability to learn. Research points to a significant correlation between sleep and our ability to wrestle with abstract concepts and retain information.

JUNE 2018 | Volume 17, Issue 5

CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER
John R. Taggart
jrtag@CLOmedia.com

PRESIDENT
Kevin A. Simpson
ksimpson@CLOmedia.com

Vice President, GROUP PUBLISHER
Clifford Capone
ccapone@CLOmedia.com

VICE PRESIDENT, EDITOR IN CHIEF
Mike Prokopeak
mikep@CLOmedia.com

Editorial Director
Rick Bell
rbell@CLOmedia.com

Managing Editor
Ashley St. John
astjohn@CLOmedia.com

SENIOR EDITOR
Lauren Dixon
ldixon@CLOmedia.com

ASSOCIATE EDITORS
Andie Burjek
aburjek@CLOmedia.com

Ave Rio
ario@CLOmedia.com

COPY EDITOR
Christopher Magnus
cmagnus@CLOmedia.com

editorial art director
Theresa Stoodley
tstoodley@CLOmedia.com

Video and Multimedia Producer
Andrew Kennedy Lewis
alewis@CLOmedia.com

Editorial InternS
Aysha Ashley Househ
ahouseh@CLOmedia.com

Mariel Tishma
mtishma@CLOmedia.com

Vice President, RESEARCH & Advisory Services
Sarah Kimmel
skimmel@CLOmedia.com

RESEARCH MANAGER
Tim Harnett
tharnett@CLOmedia.com

Data Scientist
Grey Litaker
glitaker@CLOmedia.com

Research Content Specialist
Kristen Britt
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Media & Production Manager
Ashley Flora
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Production Coordinator
Nina Howard
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VICE PRESIDENT, EVENTS
Trey Smith
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Events Content Coordinator
Malaz Elsheikh
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Webcast Manager
Alec O’Dell
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Events Graphic Designer
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BUSINESS MANAGER
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Regional Sales ManagerS
Derek Graham
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Robert Stevens
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Daniella Weinberg
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Director, Business Development 
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Audience Development Director
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Digital & Audience Insights Manager
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Digital Coordinator
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LIST MANAGER
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Business Administration Manager
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CONTRIBUTING WRITERS
Josh Bersin
David DeFilippo
Michael E. Echols
Sarah Fister Gale
Whitney Johnson
Barry Kaplan
Jeff Manchester
Jack J. Phillips
Patti P. Phillips
Michael F. Tucker

CHIEF LEARNING OFFICER EDITORIAL ADVISORY BOARD

Cedric Coco, EVP, Chief People Officer, Brookdale Senior Living Inc.
Lisa Doyle, Head of Retail Training, Ace Hardware
David DeFilippo, Chief People and Learning Officer, Suffolk
Tamar Elkeles, Chief Talent Executive, Atlantic Bridge Capital
Thomas Evans, (Ret.) Chief Learning Officer, PricewaterhouseCoopers
Gerry Hudson-Martin, Director, Corporate Learning Strategies, Business Architects
Kimo Kippen, President, Aloha Learning Advisors
Rob Lauber, Vice President, Chief Learning Officer, McDonald’s Corp.
Maj. Gen. Erwin F. Lessel, (Ret.) U.S. Air Force, Director, Deloitte Consulting
Justin Lombardo, (Ret.) Chief Learning Officer, Baptist Health
Adri Maisonet-Morales, Vice President, Enterprise Learning and Development, Blue Cross Blue Shield of North Carolina
Alan Malinchak, CEO, Éclat Transitions LLC
Lee Maxey, CEO, MindMax
Bob Mosher, Senior Partner and Chief Learning Evangelist, APPLY Synergies
Rebecca Ray, Executive Vice President, The Conference Board
Allison Rossett, (Ret.) Professor of Educational Technology, San Diego State University
Diana Thomas, CEO and Founder, Winning Results
David Vance, Executive Director, Center for Talent Reporting
Kevin D. Wilde, Executive Leadership Fellow, Carlson School of Management, University of Minnesota
James P. Woolsey, President, Defense Aquisition University

Chief Learning Officer (ISSN 1935-8148) is published monthly, except bi-monthly in January/February and July/August by MediaTec Publishing Inc., 111 E. Wacker Dr., Suite 1200, Chicago IL 60601.  Periodicals postage paid at Chicago, IL and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Chief Learning Officer, P.O. Box 8712 Lowell, MA 01853. Subscriptions are free to qualified professionals within the US and Canada. Digital free subscriptions are available worldwide. Nonqualified paid subscriptions are available at the subscription price of $199 for 10 issues.  All countries outside the US and Canada must be prepaid in US funds with an additional $33 postage surcharge.  Single price copy is $29.99.

Chief Learning Officer and CLOmedia.com are the trademarks of MediaTec Publishing Inc. Copyright © 2018, MediaTec Publishing Inc. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Reproduction of material published in Chief Learning Officer is forbidden without permission.

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on the cover: Photo by Will Byington

20


2018 LearningElite Organization of the Year

Ave Rio
Through its learning-led future-oriented strategy, Accenture positively impacts employees, clients and the bottom line.

60


Case Study

Sarah Fister Gale
L’Oréal uses an annual competition to teach students about its entrepreneurial culture and find the best new talent.

62


Business Intelligence

Mike Prokopeak
Several years of data from the world’s best companies for L&D show a focus on efficiency and high-performance spending.

2018 LearningElite

18
Sarah Kimmel
For this year’s LearningElite organizations, custom solutions are the key to making learning work for the business.
20
Editorial Staff
For the best of the best, L&D practices and modalities are as unique as the organizations themselves, incorporating AI, neuroscience, metrics, analytics, reskilling and more.
40
The final ranking of this year’s 78 top organizations for L&D.

Features

48
Barry Kaplan and Jeff Manchester
An organization’s greatest asset is its team members — and their authentic connection.
56
Michael F. Tucker
Boosting female representation can help close the leadership talent gap.

Experts

10
Michael E. Echols
Learning Investment in the Face of Innovation
12
Josh Bersin
Harnessing Hyperconnectivity
14
Jack J. & Patti P. Phillips
ROI Goes to School and Church
16
Dave DeFilippo
Learning Through Service
66
Whitney Johnson
Building Your A-Team

Resources

4
Taking a Break for Learning

Are you a part of the CLO Network?

Business Impact


Learning Investment in the Face of Innovation

Looking at learning as an investment that creates human capital By Michael E. Echols

Michael E. Echols is principal and founder of Human Capital LLC and author of “Your Future Is Calling.”
He can be reached at editor@CLOmedia.com.

T

he importance of investment in value creation has again been affirmed in 2018 financial markets in reaction to the federal tax policy passed by Congress in December 2017. Trillions of dollars of wealth have been created and agreement about the importance of investment in national infrastructure awaits political courage to act.

Looking at learning as an investment that creates human capital is timely and valuable. The why, what and how of learning investment are all important, but for now attention is on the why.

Policies and practices used to manage tangible asset investment can serve as a reference. Accountants have pre-empted investment beliefs and behaviors with a rigorous set of rules, which are applied primarily to tangible assets recorded on the balance sheet. It is agreed that the balance sheet archives assets with enduring future value. The accounting rules require that an enterprise own an asset for it to go on the balance sheet, something that will never happen when it comes to human capital.

But we can state, without reservation, that expenditures for learning all are being made with the expectation of future benefit. No one behaves as though learning done today is expected to disappear tomorrow. We all believe that implicit to true learning is enduring value. Consider a position among learning leaders where one side is arguing that learning is only about the present and not about the future. Absurd? Indeed! But this is exactly how we treat learning investments in financial reporting.

Best Practices


Harnessing Hyperconnectivity

How do we use the explosion of technology and content to truly drive results? By Josh Bersin

Josh Bersin is founder of Bersin, known as Bersin by Deloitte, and a principal with Deloitte Consulting LLP.
He can be reached at editor@CLOmedia.com.

T

his year the corporate learning market is going through explosive change: microlearning and adaptive learning systems have arrived, there’s an explosion of interest in learning experience platforms and consumer-like learning environments, and video, audio and small chunks of relevant content are available everywhere.

All this change is positive: We are turning the traditional, page-turning e-learning experience of the past into a dynamic, agile, as-needed learning experience that fits into the way we use the internet. But how do we apply all this to the skills development and training needs of business?

A new paradigm has arrived, one I’ve written about before and that I call “learning in the flow of work.”

Accountability


ROI Goes to School and Church

Organizations of all types face accountability By Jack J. Phillips and Patti P. Phillips

Jack J. Phillips is chairman and Patti P. Phillips is president and CEO of the ROI Institute.
They can be reached at editor@CLOmedia.com.

W

hen you think about ROI, you likely think of businesses and service organizations. In recent years, however, there has been a rise of ROI use among nonprofits, nongovernmental organizations, governments and health care. How are these organizations using the ROI Methodology to show the value of their projects and programs?

The Phillips ROI Methodology is a 10-step process organizations can use to show the value of programs and initiatives. It measures six types of data: reaction and planned data (level 1), learning (level 2), application and implementation (level 3), business impact (level 4), ROI (level 5) and intangibles.

Across the United States, school systems are implementing the ROI Methodology in their education programs, departments and functions. Some school systems have evaluated a program offered to sixth and seventh graders called “The Leader in Me,” available through FranklinCovey. This program is designed to help students assume more accountability and responsibility and become better team members. Programs such as these can have tremendous payoff, particularly in student and school outcomes. Demonstrating this value for the money spent increases the likelihood that school system leaders will continue investing.

on the front line


Learning Through Service

How are we investing in the learning, talent and HR profession? By Dave Defilippo

Dave DeFilippo is chief people and learning officer for Suffolk.
He can be reached at editor@CLOmedia.com.

I

recently had the opportunity to spend two days teaching a group of 13 aspiring chief learning officers during the spring CLO Accelerator program in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, March 24-25. For those unfamiliar with the accelerator, it’s a two-day course for learning professionals who aspire to become CLO for their organization and for business managers new to the role of learning leader. The experience is intended to provide students with the vision and tools to execute in the role.

Best of the best: Shelby Kan, left, and Allison Horn of Accenture accept the 2018 LearningElite award for Organization of the Year.

photos by Will Byington

Finding the Perfect Fit

For this year’s LearningElite organizations, custom solutions are the key to making learning work for the business.

By Sarah Kimmel

As Chief Learning Officer’s LearningElite program enters its eighth year, common threads have emerged among the organizations.

LearningElite winners are serious about learning. Their teams carefully craft programs that align learning strategy with business strategy. Their leaders believe in the value learning and development gives the organization. L&D initiatives are delivered through different modalities, often using technology to enhance participation and deliver anytime, anywhere content. Key performance indicators are built into programs to ensure results are quantifiable. Results are shared with senior leaders to demonstrate the positive impact learning has on the business.

Shelby Kan, left, and Allison Horn.

At Accenture, Human Learning Truly Pays Off

Through its learning-led future-oriented strategy, Accenture’s research and experimentation positively impact employees, clients and the bottom line.

BY AVE RIO

In 2017, the talent and learning organization of global management consulting firm Accenture aided the firm in its effort to help clients with the digital transformation of the world through a future-oriented strategy. With more than 425,000 employees in 120 countries and 40 industries, the sheer scale and scope of the learning efforts at the world’s largest independent technology services provider makes the firm stand out. Accenture also won the 2014 LearningElite competition, with 305,000 employees and $30 billion in revenue. In fiscal 2017, the firm had $34.9 billion in revenue.

From left: Eliska Paratore, John Palmer and Melissa Corwin.

AT&T: Committed to the Future

AT&T’s future-ready focus and technology integration into learning have resulted in substantial benefits to employees.

By Ave Rio

Multinational telecommunications conglomerate AT&T Inc. is consistently focused on integrating technology into learning. In 2017, the company’s technological investments paid off.
Going into the year, only about 15 percent of AT&T’s content was mobile optimized. The firm set a bold goal to mobile optimize 100 percent of non-leader-led content by the end of 2017 and they completed that goal in September 2017. Further, in April that year, the firm committed to only creating new content that is 100 percent mobilized. This transformation allows learners to access content on any device, from any location, at any time. AT&T Senior Vice President and CLO John Palmer said this mobilization has also had significant payoffs from an engagement perspective.

“We focus on creating a culture of continuous learning,” Palmer said. “What differentiates us from peer groups is our commitment and our scale of our learning programs.”

Palmer said the firm spends about $250 million on training programs every year, equating to about 19 million hours of learning across the enterprise, which employs about 254,000 individuals.

From left: David Egeland, Erin Miller, Bill Sciortino, Jill Rogers and Cary Maslow.

Dedicated to Employee Development at Vi

At Vi, learning and employee development is ingrained in the corporate culture.

By Rick Bell

While the human spirit indeed can move mountains in the face of a truly dire situation, hours of preparation, practice and training can go a long way, too.

With a massive Category 5 hurricane threatening to destroy a wide swath of south Florida in the fall of 2017, the executive team at senior living provider Vi was faced with a monumental challenge. It was the company’s 30th anniversary that month, but any celebration would have to wait.

From left: Diane August, Donald Dennis and Tish Damschroder.

Collaboration, Integration and Leadership at Nationwide

At the insurance and financial services company, building a culture of learning starts at the top.

By Ashley St. John

There are three things that make Nationwide’s learning program elite, according to Kathleen L. Smith, vice president, talent management and development.

“One is that it is a highly collaborative community of learning leaders across the company,” Smith said. “We work together to look to the future, to share best practices, to mature our capabilities. The second thing is the way learning is integrated. It’s an integrated part of all strategic efforts. And I think last, what makes us elite is the level of leadership sponsorship for the work. Our leaders are highly engaged in learning — they participate, they contribute, they strategize with us, they help define outcomes, and they ensure that the metrics for everything that we do are visible.”

From left: Erv Lessel, Lisa Nichols, Leslie Knowlton, Graham Johnston, Nicole Roy-Tobin, Joshua LeFebvre, Joanna Wubben and Terry Bickham.

Deloitte’s Learning Function Aims to be So Visible, It’s Invisible

Deloitte’s learning strategy aligns with business strategy in its organizational structure, performance management process and formal learning initiatives.

BY LAUREN DIXON

While many learning functions have to prove their alignment and benefit to business strategy, Deloitte’s talent development team purposefully built alignment into the structure of the company and its learning initiatives.

Eight chief learning officers each focus on various segments of the company or the broader learning strategy “to help ensure that there’s alignment in the curriculum to what their specific needs are,” said Nicole Roy-Tobin, managing director of talent development in the strategy and innovation segment of Deloitte.

From left: Jane Grimley, William Magagna, Janina Beilner and Heather Chucta.

Agility Leads to Growth at Siemens Healthineers

The company looks for opportunities for continuous improvement in learning.

BY AYSHA ASHLEY HOUSEH

It can be difficult to pinpoint your weaknesses, but Siemens Healthineers doesn’t shy away from looking into areas where they can continuously improve. The medical technology company uses bench-marking as one of the main tools to do this and reinvented its team and management in 2017. They are still in “growth mode” and as part of that growth, the company identified business areas where they needed to improve.

“It’s always good to know where you’re weak so that you can apply your focus and your resources there,” said William Magagna, vice president of Virtual Education Solutions, the learning team within Siemens Healthineers.

From left: Robert Perrone, Cyndi Bruce and Michele Graham.

KPMG Puts People First

At KPMG, learning is a process, not an event.

BY AYSHA ASHLEY HOUSEH

Learning is constant, no matter what industry you are a part of. KPMG Chief Learning Officer Corey Muñoz said he views learning as “a process or as continuous, not as an event.” The audit, tax and advisory company already values learning but plans to enhance its programs even further.

Muñoz said what sets KPMG apart is the fact that they put their people first, and that’s key to making learning effective.

David Livingston, left, and Kevin Slaughter.

HPI, Kaiser Permanente Flourishes in Face of Uncertainty

Thanks to a robust learning strategy, HPI is prepared to manage the uncharted territories of health care in the U.S.

BY ANDIE BURJEK

With the American health care environment in flux, for an insurance company to not only maintain but improve excellence over the past several years is truly an admirable feat. The Health Plan Institute, the learning and development arm that supports the sales, marketing and business development staff of major health insurer Kaiser Permanente, managed to do just that, rising through the LearningElite ranks even as the future of U.S. health care grows increasingly uncertain.

HPI took the No. 43 spot in the 2015 LearningElite competition. It’s only improved since, taking No. 26 in 2016, No. 21 in 2017 and now No. 8.

John Loch, left, and Chrystal Watts.

Janssen: Relentless Measurement Powered by Passion

Utilizing serious engagement and measurable results leads to more relevant lessons and better patient care.

BY MARIEL TISHMA

In an ever-changing biotech industry rife with competition, Janssen has had to jump through a lot of hoops. Considering the industry is also highly regulated, Janssen’s program has had to remain both robust and active to meet standards that are higher than most.

“We’re going to have to make smart, effective decisions in this highly complex, competitive marketplace,” said Michelle Lynch, senior director of sales, learning and development and immunology for Janssen. “There will always be trade-offs, but if we’re keeping the learner at the center of what we’re doing, it will drive us as our north star.”

From left: Mandy Ledkins, Jim McFee, Jeannine Siembida, Wendy White and Mike Coughlin.

International Paper Grows Learning at Home

A focus on integration, collaboration and safety have transformed International Paper into a global powerhouse for learning.

BY MARIEL TISHMA

“We’re not a sexy industry. We are an industry where people say, ‘Oh, there’s that plant down the road, you don’t really want to go work there,’ ” said Jeannine M. Siembida, director of the Global Manufacturing Training Initiative at International Paper. With low desirability and aging employees, IP has faced massive losses to personnel.

“We had to put together a program to get ready to lose about half of our workforce in a pretty short span of time,” Siembida said.

11

Sidley Austin
During the past year, Sidley Austin offered more than 1,300 educational programs to its lawyers, staff, alumni and clients around the globe. In keeping with the firm’s culture of learning, 85 percent were developed and delivered by Sidley personnel.

Company size: 3,808 Location: U.S.

12

Blue Cross and Blue Shield of North Carolina
Blue Exchange is BCBSNC’s mentoring program, which enjoys considerable leadership support and commitment. In 2017, 132 mentors and mentees participated in one-on-one sessions, which were supplemented with small group discussions and activities with guest leaders.

Company size: 7,150 Location: U.S.

17

New York Life Insurance Co.
Through Million Dollar Round Table mentorship, experienced agents mentor junior agents to help them achieve MDRT status. With 2,500-plus New York Life members, New York Life has led MDRT membership for the past 63 years and added members every year — including 58 first-timers in 2017.

Company size: 22,000 Location: U.S.

18

USAA
In 2017, USAA revised an old credit-card course resulting in a program length reduction of 15 days, a shortened average handle time and a decrease in calls to the help desk. The new program contributed to $215,690 in labor productivity gains and a gained net present value of the course of $2.5 million.

Company size: 30,350 Location: U.S.

26

ATB Financial
The learning team at ATB Financial leveraged 483 team members to support more than 5,300 in successfully undertaking a massive transformational change. The power of the community to support learning is just one example of how ATB is transforming learning, from content creators to experience architects.

Company size: 5,501 Location: Canada

27

Bankers Life
Bankers Life launched a completely new sales model and new agent training program for 2017. Using new techniques and technologies, the program has saved the company more than $1 million, while significantly improving key new agent sales (12.4 percent) and retention (8.7 percent) metrics.

Company size: 1,361 Location: U.S.

35

UST Global Inc.
The PM L3, a five-day program conducted with a high-reality simulator, has exponentially improved the skills and situational leadership of UST Global’s project managers, enabling them to identify new revenue and margin-improvement opportunities in their projects to the tune of $13.37 million last year.

Company size: 16,500 Location: U.S.

Future-proof your corporate learning strategy:

4 simple steps to cut through the clutter

By Blackboard

Learning and Development (L&D) leaders know the challenges facing corporate trainers today: shrinking budgets, a dispersed and mobile workforce, evolving business demands, and shifting employee expectations.

Equally daunting is all the research on learning, new teaching methodologies, and endless technology. Rather than empowering leaders, it can lead to information overload. Employees suffer the same fate. While access to the information they need to perform their jobs delivers clear benefits, it also has its downsides: distraction, poor time management, and burnout. It’s therefore imperative to cut through the clutter and assess the best path forward.

Here are four simple steps to help you find the right partner and develop a successful learning strategy for your company.

DeVryWORKS on Meeting the Challenge of Digital Fluency

CEO of DeVryWORKS Joe Mozden Outlines the Intersection of Business Strategy and Talent Development

By Adina Sapp

Research from Forrester shows that 50 percent of CEOs expect that by 2020 nearly half of all revenue
will come from digital business. This is up from 20 percent just a few years ago. The report projects that: “As risk to existing revenue streams becomes apparent, companies will begin making a panicked effort to attract digital talent.”

Expanding on this research and the theme of a panel discussion from DeVryWORKS titled “Digital Fluency
in the Workplace,” Joe Mozden urges L&D leaders to not delay in kicking off digital strategies and digital methodologies. Technology is integral to the current business landscape, and we must act rather than getting bogged down in overplanning. “The most important thing is to start,” he says, “and then modify as you go.”

An organization’s greatest asset is its team members — and their authentic connection.

BY BARRY KAPLAN AND JEFF MANCHESTER

Many of our coaching engagements are what we call “well work” — with teams that are performing well, getting along and highly functional. Why are we consulted when something isn’t broken? There is significant potential for teams beyond being highly functional. We’re invited to get them to the next level of their development and growth — to become an authentic team. Our secret code is simple: Share a bit of humanity so your teammates see you as a real person, not just someone who fills a role.

To connect on a human level, being able and willing to express emotion and vulnerability is paramount. Colleagues may admire your intellect, appreciate your experience and rely on your expertise; however, they will trust you when they connect to your humanity, the part of you that lies beyond your professional skills.

Let them in to the fragile, even raw, parts of yourself that you have learned to keep intimate. Yes, it’s awkward and scary: That’s the point. Your head tells you to hold back. So, why take the risk? For the opportunity to forge a bond of trust and a deep, authentic connection. By showing your vulnerability, you demonstrate the courage to be a whole person — someone who stretches beyond the limits of aptitude and productivity.

An organization’s greatest asset is its team members — and their authentic connection.

BY BARRY KAPLAN AND JEFF MANCHESTER

Many of our coaching engagements are what we call “well work” — with teams that are performing well, getting along and highly functional. Why are we consulted when something isn’t broken? There is significant potential for teams beyond being highly functional. We’re invited to get them to the next level of their development and growth — to become an authentic team. Our secret code is simple: Share a bit of humanity so your teammates see you as a real person, not just someone who fills a role.

To connect on a human level, being able and willing to express emotion and vulnerability is paramount. Colleagues may admire your intellect, appreciate your experience and rely on your expertise; however, they will trust you when they connect to your humanity, the part of you that lies beyond your professional skills.

Let them in to the fragile, even raw, parts of yourself that you have learned to keep intimate. Yes, it’s awkward and scary: That’s the point. Your head tells you to hold back. So, why take the risk? For the opportunity to forge a bond of trust and a deep, authentic connection. By showing your vulnerability, you demonstrate the courage to be a whole person — someone who stretches beyond the limits of aptitude and productivity.

What lessons can we learn from the world’s greatest entrepreneurs? Fall 2018 CLO Symposium Keynote Guy Raz is uniquely qualified to answer this question. As host, co-creator and editorial director of three NPR podcasts, including two of its most popular, “TED Radio Hour” and “How I Built This,” Raz is heard by more than 14 million people around the world each month. He joined NPR in 1997 as an intern and has worked virtually every job in the newsroom from temporary production assistant to foreign correspondent to breaking news anchor. In that time, through interviews with more than 6,000 personalities, Raz has met some of the most successful storytellers, politicians and innovators of our time.

ARE THERE CERTAIN QUALITIES THAT SUCCESSFUL ENTREPRENEURS SHARE?

There is a lot of mythology about the entrepreneur as superhero. What I try to do on my program is to demystify that narrative. Every single person has the capacity to take risks, to believe in an idea deeply, to maintain optimism, to pivot when necessary and to fail fast. The only difference between a successful entrepreneur and anyone else is making the attempt. Successful entrepreneurs say “I will” rather than “I wish.”

Boosting female representation can help close the leadership talent gap.

BY MICHAEL F. TUCKER

Companies throughout the world feel the pressing need for more effective global leadership. Studies show organizations do not have the global leaders needed to keep up with the speed of business, nor are they satisfied with the quality of their leaders. In short, they do not have current leadership or the bench strength to meet future business needs.

One way for learning leaders to help close this gap is to include more women more quickly in leadership roles. Yet, this is not happening to the extent required to meet demand.

While the number of female CEOs at Fortune 500 companies is rising, they still only constitute 5.4 percent. A recent study by Grant Thornton, “Women in Business: Turning Promise Into Practice,” showed that one-third of global businesses had no women in senior management roles as of 2017 and that this had not changed since 2011.

Boosting female representation can help close the leadership talent gap.

BY MICHAEL F. TUCKER

Companies throughout the world feel the pressing need for more effective global leadership. Studies show organizations do not have the global leaders needed to keep up with the speed of business, nor are they satisfied with the quality of their leaders. In short, they do not have current leadership or the bench strength to meet future business needs.

One way for learning leaders to help close this gap is to include more women more quickly in leadership roles. Yet, this is not happening to the extent required to meet demand.

While the number of female CEOs at Fortune 500 companies is rising, they still only constitute 5.4 percent. A recent study by Grant Thornton, “Women in Business: Turning Promise Into Practice,” showed that one-third of global businesses had no women in senior management roles as of 2017 and that this had not changed since 2011.

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Case Study


L’Oréal’s Brandstorm Challenge

BY SARAH FISTER GALE

I

n March 2018, more than 31,000 students from across the globe uploaded video pitches to Brandstorm, L’Oréal’s annual competition to disrupt the beauty industry. This year’s challenge: Invent the professional salon experience of the future.

The $32 billion global cosmetics giant has hosted Brandstorm for 26 years as a way to introduce students to L’Oréal’s culture and way of working. But it’s more than just an elaborate and expensive recruiting tool. Brandstorm has become a vital learning path for both students and employees, according to Carole Pasco-Domergue, L’Oréal’s chief marketing officer for global HR in Paris. “One of the key objectives of Brandstorm is to contribute to the development of young talent,” she said. “There are multiple learning touchpoints throughout the entire experience.”

Business Intelligence


Measuring Up the Elite

Several years of data from the world’s best companies for learning and development reveal a focus on efficiency and high-performance spending.

By Mike Prokopeak

M

oney matters when it comes to a high-performing learning organization. Getting the budget to analyze needs, develop programs and seize opportunities shouldn’t be underestimated as a key to success.

But the size of the learning budget matters less than the precision with which L&D deploys it.

A look at several years’ worth of data from the Chief Learning Officer LearningElite, the magazine’s annual list of high-performing learning organizations, reveals that the best learning organizations focus on efficiency. (Note: A full report of these findings is available at www.learningelite.CLOmedia.com.)

in conclusion


Building Your A-Team

Three team-building lessons from the world of athletics BY Whitney Johnson

Whitney Johnson is an executive coach, speaker and innovation thinker. She is author of “Build an A-Team” and host of the critically acclaimed “Disrupt Yourself ” podcast.

S

ports provide a window into effective team-building. What promotes team cohesion and what can sabotage it? How do coaches “manage” their teams to build units that are greater than the sum of their parts?

John Calipari, head coach of the University of Kentucky men’s basketball team, is famous for his high level of recruiting. Year after year he acquires top players, many of them “one and done,” meaning they attend only the single required year of college before declaring for the NBA draft. Despite the short tenure of many athletes in this program, Kentucky is almost always a national title contender.

To consistently attract talent at this level requires a powerful reputation for talent development. Recruits anticipate that the single season they play at Kentucky will maximize their abilities and showcase their skills in order to realize their objective of an NBA career.

Thanks for reading our June 2018 issue!