Chief Learning Officer
June 2019

Editor’s Letter


There’s No Insurance Against Disruption
Mike Prokopeak Editor in Chief
I

f you’re rethinking your approach to employee learning, then Nationwide is on your side.

If you’re ready to take out the old in favor of something new, then Nationwide is on your side. If, in the face of rapid change, you’re simply not willing to sit still, then Nationwide is on your side.

That’s a bit of a strange place for a 93-year old insurance company to be. After all, the whole business is built on protecting people, property and businesses from the risk that comes along with an unexpected change in plans.

From their beginnings as a loose band of local traders to their evolution into full-blown global companies, insurers have sought to anticipate bad things that could happen, remove risk and promote stability. Change? Well, that can be risky.

JUNE 2019 | Volume 18, Issue 5

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UPCOMING!
MAY 16
Redefining and Reskilling the Professional of the Future
MAY 23
Solve the Employee Engagement Challenge: Build a Coaching Culture
PREVIOUSLY AIRED!
MAY 2
What Your Employees Need to Learn to Work With Data in the 21st Century
MAY 7
5 Moments of Learning Need
Check out more previously aired webinars at ChiefLearningOfficer.com/On-demand
Available live on the air date and on demand for one year after unless otherwise specified.
Check them out today and keep the education going!
Free,
Live,
Online.
Chief Learning Officer is pleased to offer live and on‑demand webinars!
UPCOMING!
MAY 16
Redefining and Reskilling the Professional of the Future
MAY 23
Solve the Employee Engagement Challenge: Build a Coaching Culture
PREVIOUSLY AIRED!
MAY 2
What Your Employees Need to Learn to Work With Data in the 21st Century
MAY 7
5 Moments of Learning Need
Check out more previously aired webinars at ChiefLearningOfficer.com/On-demand
Available live on the air date and on demand for one year after unless otherwise specified.
Check them out today and keep the education going!
CLO June 2019 Webinar
CLO Contents June 2019
2019 LearningElite Organization of the Year
2019 LearningElite Organization of the Year
on the cover: Photo by Robb McCormick

10


Lynne Bamford of Northshore shares her journey to CLO; State Farm’s Carra Simmons says AI is the new frontier for learning; and people share what they’re reading these days.
36


2019 LearningElite Organization of the Year

Rick Bell
At Nationwide, 2019’s No. 1 LearningElite organization, innovation is never an afterthought.

64


Case Study

Rocio Villaseñor
Quest Diagnostics is providing senior executive leaders enterprisewide leadership development.

66


Business Intelligence

Ashley St. John
The best learning organizations are doing a lot with a little.

CLO Contents June 2019
Leadership Styles
The Power of Learning-Focused Leadership

2019 LearningElite

34
Sarah Kimmel
This year’s LearningElite organizations use learning and development to meet disruption head-on.
36
Editorial Staff
The best of the best in L&D are tackling change, empowering employees and pursuing excellence.
56
The final ranking of this year’s 57 top organizations for L&D.

Features

22
Karen Hebert-Maccaro
Better learners are better leaders, and practicing learning-focused leadership can make better teams.
60
Sarah Fister Gale
Stop trying to figure out what kind of leader you should be, and focus on what kind of leader your people need.

Experts

16
Elliott Masie
Prompt, Push, Ping (But Don’t Pester)
17
Rosina L. Racioppi
The Feedback Phenomenon
18
Jack J. Phillips & Patti P. Phillips
Intangibles and Talent Development
20
David DeFilippo
Rethinking Organizational Correspondence
70
John Gillis Jr.
How the World Cup Teaches Us Role Clarity

Resources

4
There’s No Insurance Against Disruption
Your Career


Your Career


Career Advice From

Lynne Bamford

Chief Learning Officer, Northshore University HealthSystem

Lynne Bamford, chief learning officer for Northshore University HealthSystem, shares her career journey and how she came into L&D.
Career Advice from Kathleen Gallo
Lynne Bamford

You made the transition from commercial real estate into learning. What led you into L&D?

I was working for Prudential Insurance Co. and I was in finance after pursuing my MBA, and I just wasn’t happy. It just wasn’t a fit for my skills, my values, my interests. I was really kind of at a loss, and I thought — what am I going to do next? I was sitting in a training class one day as a participant, and watching the instructor and thinking, wow, that guy’s got a really interesting job. I wonder what that’s all about? And then, by the afternoon of watching him, I realized: I have those skills. I’m going into — what was then — corporate training. That was, I hate to admit it, 20 years ago. So, it was literally that epiphany of trying to figure out how I was going to find something that I was interested in and passionate about. So, I kind of migrated slowly. I volunteered to do as much training as possible while I was still at Prudential. I got a little help with some coursework to make the transition. And then I moved into it, and I’ve never looked back or regretted it.

Small Bites - Lynne Bamford answers our rapid-fire questions
CLOs: overrated or underrated?
Totally underrated!
CLOs totally underrated
Gamification is underrated
How about gamification?
Underrated. This may just be my perspective since we’re just starting to use it now. I think it’s got tremendous potential.
Your Career


Your Career


What Are You Reading?
The Bellweather Effect: Stop Following. Start Inspiring. by Lance Secretan
The Bellweather Effect: Stop Following. Start Inspiring.
By Lance Secretan
This book is an eye-opener in terms of inspiring leadership. Secretan is a long-standing and revolutionary thinker in terms of leadership theory, and this book gets to the heart of many of the myths we surround ourselves with in the workplace when it comes to leading people. His key message is that inspiring leadership is driven from care, compassion and love in the workplace — a message often lost in today’s fast-paced, demanding work environment. The common-sense way in which he contrasts what we do with what people want is refreshing.
Carol Leaman
— Carol Leaman, CEO, Axonify
Your Career


Your Career


Top of Mind
The Next New Frontier By Carra Simmons
State Farm Insurance Chief Learning Officer Carra Simmons says artificial intelligence is the next new frontier for learning.
Carra Simmons
Carra Simmons

When Neil Armstrong took that famous first step, do you think he was wondering how it would impact learning at his organization? Probably not, but I would like to think someone at NASA was.

Lately, I find more and more of my discussions are focused on identifying the next new frontier for learning in the workplace — learning solutions that span industries; harness current customer, workforce and technology trends; and have a broad impact on business operations. As learning professionals, it’s important that we keep our eyes focused on the horizon, so we can help business partners see the learning possibilities that exist there.

As I look to the horizon, I see artificial intelligence as the next new frontier. And I am particularly excited about it because AI connects to learning in the workplace in a way that previous opportunities haven’t.

imperatives


Prompt, Push, Ping (But Don’t Pester)
Nudges belong in our learning design toolbox By Elliott Masie
Elliott Masie

Elliott Masie is CEO of The Masie Center, an international think tank focused on learning and workplace productivity, and chairman and CLO of The Masie Center’s Learning Consortium.
He can be reached at editor@CLOmedia.com.

I

magine gentle nudges coming to your employees. A text message. A collaborative system note (perhaps on Jive, Slack or Yammer). An audio whisper from Alexa or a ping from Siri on an Apple Watch. A projected phrase appearing on the dashboard of a vehicle.

The nudge is never coercive, angry, manipulative or judgmental. The nudge is a prod or reminder to pay attention or to complete a task.

In a letter to the Hebrew newspaper Haaretz by well-known Israeli behavioral psychologist Maya Bar-Hillel, she wrote the following: “The meaning of the English word ‘nudge’ is a gentle push, not ‘pestering’ [nidnud]…. A nudge is [something that] inclines people in a given direction without constraining their freedom of choice.

Let’s welcome, design, deploy, honor and even enjoy adding nudges to our learning programs and activities.

Growing Diverse Talent


The Feedback Phenomenon
How insight promotes growth By Rosina L. Racioppi
Rosina L. Racioppi

Rosina L. Racioppi is president and CEO of Women Unlimited Inc. She can be reached at editor@CLOmedia.com.

I

hear it over and over from talented women in our Women Unlimited programs: “My work should speak for itself.” Because they are exceptionally good at what they do, many women see no need to talk about themselves or their accomplishments. They presume others will notice and reward their outstanding performance with increased pay and position.

Unfortunately, it doesn’t usually happen that way, especially when it comes to career advancement. By letting their work stand on its own, women are abdicating control of the message their work should send. They are allowing a perception gap to take hold between how they see themselves and how others see them. They are leaving to chance how corporate leaders who make advancement decisions and provide growth opportunities will interpret their work.

Accountability


Intangibles and Talent Development
Seven steps to measure intangibles By Jack J. Phillips and Patti P. Phillips
Jack J. Phillips
Patti P. Phillips

Jack J. Phillips is the chairman, and Patti P. Phillips is president and CEO of the ROI Institute. They can be reached at editor@CLOmedia.com.

A

lmost every talent development program has a variety of intangibles connected to it in some way. For many programs, the intangibles actually form the basis for the program in the beginning. Intangibles are usually perceived to be soft, squishy concepts that are difficult to measure and even more difficult to monetize.

The difficulty in showing the connection of intangibles to a particular program is exacerbated by the fact that many intangibles are not formally measured in an organization. If they are not measured, how can they be connected to the talent development program?

First, we must dispel the myth that intangibles cannot be measured. Even if the intangible is a perception, and most of them are, it can still be measured. This is common in measures of customer satisfaction (or net promoter score), brand, job satisfaction, job engagement and approval ratings.

Perhaps it is helpful to define the intangibles. In our work with ROI Institute, we define a tangible measure as a measure that can be converted to money credibly with a reasonable amount of resources. Conversely, intangible measures are those that cannot be converted to money credibly with a reasonable amount of resources. Talent development programs often provide a large number of potential intangibles in an organization, such as agility, burnout, communication, grit, happiness, trust and sustainability, to name a few.

ON THE FRONT LINE


Rethinking Organizational Correspondence
Email alone isn’t cutting it By David Defilippo
Michael E. Echols is principal and founder of Human Capital LLC

David DeFilippo is principal of DeFilippo Leadership Inc. and an executive coach at Harvard Business School. He can be reached at editor@CLOmedia.com.

G

one are the days of the old-fashioned paper-based memo. Don’t get me wrong — I appreciate the speed and global reach that email provides with a click of the “send” button, but I fear we have lost something with the complete transition to this less tangible communication medium. If the major goals of communication in an organizational setting are to share information, influence others and take action, all of which are highly relevant to an organization’s effectiveness, then we should optimize every opportunity to correspond with one another.

Email started between time-sharing computers in the 1960s and was a synchronous communication method, meaning that users had to be logged into the same network at the same time to share messages. This system was then improved by computer programmer Ray Tomlinson in the 1970s as part of the ARPANET system, the precursor to today’s internet, so that users could asynchronously send mail to one another’s mailbox. In its current state, email, text messaging and social media are all part of our daily lives at work and home, which has led to concerns regarding information overload and the expectations that derive from being “on” constantly.

Better learners are better leaders, and practicing learning-focused leadership can make better teams.
The Power of Learning-Focused Leadership Title
Better learners are better leaders, and practicing learning-focused leadership can make better teams.
By Karen Hebert-Maccaro
The relationship between learning and leading is not a new idea. In a 1990 speech delivered to McKinsey & Co., John W. Gardner, Stanford professor and policy developer under the Lyndon Johnson administration, said the most pressing need for leaders was to focus on “personal renewal.” He urged leaders to be interested, not just interesting, and to seek out information and experiences that would help them continuously learn and grow. He put it best when he said, “We can’t write off the danger of complacency, growing rigidity, imprisonment by our own comfortable habits and opinions.”
Better learners are better leaders, and practicing learning-focused leadership can make better teams.
The Power of Learning-Focused Leadership Title
Better learners are better leaders, and practicing learning-focused leadership can make better teams.
By Karen Hebert-Maccaro
The relationship between learning and leading is not a new idea. In a 1990 speech delivered to McKinsey & Co., John W. Gardner, Stanford professor and policy developer under the Lyndon Johnson administration, said the most pressing need for leaders was to focus on “personal renewal.” He urged leaders to be interested, not just interesting, and to seek out information and experiences that would help them continuously learn and grow. He put it best when he said, “We can’t write off the danger of complacency, growing rigidity, imprisonment by our own comfortable habits and opinions.”
Better learners are better leaders, and practicing learning-focused leadership can make better teams.
Sponsored Content
Sponsored Content

Today’s Learner/Leader is Self-Directed and Intrinsically-Motivated

By Deb Jewell, senior director of lifelong learning, UVA Darden Executive Education

In a study of working professionals who had recently undertaken non-degree professional development*, the University of Virginia Darden School Foundation’s Executive Education gained a deeper understanding of their motivations. These statistics, taken together, paint a picture of a professional who wants to have control of their own learning journey, prioritizing professional development that meets the requirements of their personal career goals. They want to be more effective at their current roles and improve higher-order skills, possibly resulting in their growth within their current organization. They are willing to consider online learning as a convenient option that allows them to learn at their own pace.

Intrinsic drivers were more important to respondents than external inducements to pursue development. In response to a question about what motivates them to seek development, the most prevalent response was “self-identified opportunity to increase competence in current role” (75%) followed by “building competency for potential promotion” (70%), significantly higher than, “suggestion from manager/company leadership” at only 52%.

Sponsored Content
Sponsored Content
Getting Personal with Learning
Building a Culture of Learning by Putting Learners in the Driver’s Seat
By Diane Belcher, Senior Director, Product Management, Harvard Business Publishing Corporate Learning

In a world where change is continuous and happens at breakneck speed, organizations are contending with talent gaps. There’s a constant need to “reskill” and “upskill” employees, and the consequences of failing to do so can be dire. A recent PwC report addressed widespread CEO concern that a lack of key skills is hindering their organizations’ ability to innovate, causing their people costs to rise, and impacting their ability to provide an optimal customer experience.1

Providing the type of personalized, learner-driven experience that today’s learners are looking for is the key to building the culture of continuous learning that’s essential in today’s fast-paced and complex world.

Sponsored Content
Sponsored Content
The Invisible Drain on Your Company’s Culture
By Monica Moses

Here’s a hard business truth: No workplace is free of the ravages of distrust. Anyone who’s ever held a job knows the frustrations that emerge when coworkers don’t trust each other – the miscommunications, rivalries, inefficiencies, morale problems, and turnover that, in the end, distract people from their work and make life stressful. And ultimately, research shows, cost money.

Dr. Mark Scullard, a PhD psychologist who serves as senior director of product innovation for Wiley’s Workplace Learning Solutions division, has studied distrust in the workplace and found its source: individual insecurity. It’s not insecurity itself that’s the problem, though; it’s our drive to cover it up. In a new eBook, The Invisible Drain on Your Company’s Culture, Scullard traces the spread of dysfunctional behaviors at work to the secret self-doubts that beset each of us and outlines a solution.

LearningElite - Nationwide Chief Learning Architect Diane August, left, and Kathy Smith, vice president, talent management and development.
PHOTO BY ROBB McCORMICK
Nationwide Chief Learning Architect Diane August, left, and Kathy Smith, vice president, talent management and development.
Embracing Change
This year’s LearningElite organizations use learning and development to meet disruption head-on.
By Sarah Kimmel
It’s been almost a decade since Chief Learning Officer first introduced the LearningElite, its annual learning and development benchmarking program. Over the years, we’ve heard countless stories from companies large and small about how organizations structure the learning function and tackle change. Of the hundreds of companies to apply to this year’s program, just 57 met our qualifying benchmarks in learning strategy, leadership commitment, learning execution, learning impact and business performance results. These five pillars form the backbone of the LearningElite, and without dedication to each dimension, a learning organization cannot perform at its peak.

Organizations hoping to qualify for the LearningElite submit answers to a robust set of application questions. A group of volunteer judges read and review applications according to a provided rubric. This year, more than 300 judges participated. Many judges participate year after year. In fact, 24 have judged the LearningElite for five years or more.

2019 Learning Elite
Nationwide - Diane August, Tishia Damschroder, Aaron Stout, Kathy Smith, Tamar Williamson and Chad Zierke. Not Pictured: Julie Ragatz Norton.

Above, from left: Diane August, Tishia Damschroder, Aaron Stout.

Below, from left, the executive learning leadership team at Nationwide: Kathy Smith, Tamar Williamson and Chad Zierke. Not Pictured: Julie Ragatz Norton. Photo courtesy of Nationwide.

2019 Learning Elite Number 8
Sprinting Toward the Finish Line

At Nationwide, 2019’s No. 1 LearningElite organization, innovation is never an afterthought.

By Rick Bell

As former football great Peyton Manning and country music crooner Brad Paisley banter back and forth on television commercials telling viewers and customers alike that “Nationwide is on your side,” it wouldn’t be a stretch for the pair to riff off the popular jingle by adding that the insurance giant is also on the side of its 31,000 employees when it comes to learning and development.

Learning methods are shifting at lightning speed, and organizations like Nationwide are discovering new and better ways to shift L&D within organizations. What worked just a decade ago has likely seen better days.

“We’ve moved from the traditional training of eight to 10 years ago. Enabling learning is much more a part of everyone’s role here,” said Diane L. August, chief learning architect at the Columbus, Ohio-based company.

2019 Learning Elite
AT&T - From left: Dahna Hull, Bri Thomas, Jason Oliver, Lisa Mitchell-Kastner, Jennifer Fitzmaurice.
From left: Dahna Hull, Bri Thomas, Jason Oliver, Lisa Mitchell-Kastner, Jennifer Fitzmaurice.
A Fixed Gaze Toward the Future
AT&T has created a culture of continuous learning, empowering employees to be future-ready.
By Ashley St. John
When it comes to AT&T’s learning strategy, future readiness is the name of the game.

“At the heart of everything we do, it comes down to our people,” said Dahna Hull, AT&T’s senior vice president of human resources. “We’ve created a culture at AT&T of continuous learning for all of our employees. We invest about $200 million a year in our internal training program, and we provide about 16 million hours of training a year. We also provide more than $24 million annually for tuition assistance. All of that heavy investment and being really transparent with employees about the need to be future-ready contributes to that culture.”

AT&T University, or TU, is the genesis for all of the organization’s learning and development programs. It comprises three departments: TU Operations, TU Leadership, and TU Shared Solutions.

2019 Learning Elite
EY - From left: Simon Berridge, Jan Cannon-Bowers, Christiana Zidwick, Brenda Sugrue, Eric Ellefsen, Shawn Phillips.
From left: Simon Berridge, Jan Cannon-Bowers, Christiana Zidwick, Brenda Sugrue, Eric Ellefsen, Shawn Phillips.
Building a Better Working World
At EY, learning is prioritized as a key differentiator.
By Ashley St. John
Building a better working world — this is EY’s ultimate purpose, one it works to espouse through its Vision 2020 strategy launched in 2013. At the heart of this strategy is having the highest-performing teams provide exceptional client service worldwide.

Recognizing that high-performing teams drive competitive advantage and that workplace learning is a key differentiator between businesses that thrive and those that do not, EY leadership hired the company’s first global chief learning officer, Brenda Sugrue. Sugrue has led the charge the past four years in developing and executing EY’s learning strategy. Key to that strategy are developing the highest-priority skills, providing an exceptional learning experience, and business impact and external recognition. Last year, EY launched LEAD, a new approach to career development and performance, which is threaded throughout the learning team’s work.

Vi - From left: Judy Whitcomb, John Moxley, Jill Denman.
From left: Judy Whitcomb, John Moxley, Jill Denman.
Learning Elite 4
Small, Yet Mighty
Vi delivers big results on a small budget.
By Ave Rio

Among other corporate giants in the top five LearningElite, such as Nationwide Insurance, AT&T and KPMG, there’s Vi, a Chicago-based company that runs 10 luxury senior living communities across the country. With fewer than 3,000 employees and a fewer resources than larger companies, Vi is able to compete with huge learning organizations nonetheless.

Judy Whitcomb, senior vice president of human resources and learning and organizational development at Vi, says one way the company is able to do that is by uniquely leveraging their business partners as true learning leaders. “We recognize we can’t do everything here,” she said. “We look to find partners in education and talent development to partner with us to ensure we’re developing and delivering high-quality solutions that drive business results.”

KPMG - From left: Rob Perrone, Lisa Namnoum, Michael Orth, Jeremy Manjorin, Corey Muñoz, Jackie Flanagan, Courtney Scheffler, Michele Graham, Patrick Incitti, Stephanie Haueis.
From left: Rob Perrone, Lisa Namnoum, Michael Orth, Jeremy Manjorin, Corey Muñoz, Jackie Flanagan, Courtney Scheffler, Michele Graham, Patrick Incitti, Stephanie Haueis.
Learning Elite 5
What Happens in the Classroom Doesn’t Stay in the Classroom
Continuous learning and a revamped measurement philosophy are helping KPMG develop a future-ready workforce.
By Andie Burjek

A regular on the LearningElite list since 2013, this year KPMG cracked the Top 5.

A key aspect of KPMG’s learning strategy has always been to continually raise the bar, said Corey Muñoz, chief learning officer of KPMG. The professional services organization needs its talent to be on top of their game. Amid constant changes, constant improvements are necessary — both for professional services consultants and the organization itself.

Learning plays a key role in that continuous improvement, and KPMG’s L&D strategy is going in a direction unique to organizations in this increasingly digital world. The organization is building a learning, development and innovation center called the KPMG Lakehouse in Lake Nona, Florida, a campus that will open in January 2020, Muñoz said.

Kaiser Permanente - From left: Allan Rotgers, David Livingston.
From left: Allan Rotgers, David Livingston.
Learning Elite 6
Permanente Elite Learning Performance
Kaiser Permanente’s Health Plan Institute brings Bitmojis to the table.
By Bethany Tomasian

The Health Plan Institute has been a steady fixture on the LearningElite Award winners list since 2015. Responsible for designing and delivering the learning and development programs that support the marketing, sales and business development functions of Kaiser Permanente’s Kaiser Foundation Health Plan, HPI is led by Executive Director David Livingston, who has been guiding the institute’s direction for the past six years.

Livingston attributes the success of HPI’s programs to the foundation on which they are set. The pillars of HPI’s programs — maintaining strategic alignment with business objectives, offering a wide variety of robust learning content, focusing on the importance of performance analysis, and developing strong assessment and evaluation tools — have been their formula for success. The elite quality of HPI’s programs all stem from these fundamental pillars, according to Livingston.

Memorial Health System - From left: Aimee Allbritton, Audra Chestnut.
From left: Aimee Allbritton, Audra Chestnut.
Learning Elite 7
An MHS Employee’s Education Is Never Done
To keep up with the changing health care landscape, Memorial Health System strives to create a culture of continuous learning.
By Bethany Tomasian

The ever-shifting nature of the health care industry can be tricky territory for organizations and their learners. Not only do providers have competitive pressures, but they must also continuously evolve learning strategies to keep up with objectives.

Despite these challenges, Memorial Health System remains unflinching. The health care provider’s mission is simple: to improve the health of the people and communities they serve. MHS’ mission is reflected in its learning strategy, which is dedicated to continuously educating employees and the communities around them.

As evidence of the organization’s commitment to learning, an annual employee engagement survey conducted in 2018 measured employees’ response to the statement: “In the past year, I have had opportunities to learn and grow.” Survey results place MHS in the 100th percentile among a peer group of more than 394 health care systems with more than 1.5 million respondents.

2019 Learning Elite
Telus International - From left: Debbie Balan, Margot Cook, Marcela Pineda.
From left: Debbie Balan, Margot Cook, Marcela Pineda.
2019 Learning Elite Number 8
Telus Makes Learning Personal
At Telus International, people learn and grow from beginning to end.
By Eva Mick

For Telus International, learning is not an option — it is a requirement. Employees at the international telecommunications company are a part of the learning process beginning with their first steps into the organization.

“Our program is a very robust and comprehensive program,” said Michelle Braden, executive director of TI’s learning and development program. “It moves from the minute somebody joins the company until they become CEO. We prepare people for each level that they move through.”

Six years ago, TI had no L&D organization or budget. Learning opportunities were limited, and low employee engagement and high turnover were impacting profitability and customer satisfaction. After hiring Braden in 2012 as its first CLO and launching its first leadership development program, TI formed its Global Learning Excellence organization in 2015. The GLE deployed a progressive, four-level career path for all call center employees, called the Learning@TI Roadmap. The road map is complemented by TI’s Learn and Grow programs, which provide continuous learning through diverse content and modalities.

2019 Learning Elite
Texas Health Resources - Daniel Gandarilla
Daniel Gandarilla
2019 Learning Elite Number 8
Learning Is Change
Texas Health Resources pushes innovation and change within learning.
By Eva Mick

Texas Health Resources, a faith-based nonprofit health care organization serving 7 million people in 16 countries, understands that sustainability and growth mean being open to — and even welcoming of — change. To remain the leading provider of health and well-being in North Texas, THR initiated the particularly big change from a transactional health care framework to a transformative model.

This change led THR to update its vision for the first time in its 21-year history. The new vision, “partnering with you for a lifetime of health and well-being,” coincided with the launch of THR’s comprehensive 10-year plan, Vision 2026, which is focused on transforming the patient experience. And in alignment with this new vision and strategy, Texas Health Resources University has implemented a complementary strategy focused on transformational approaches to learning and relationship building — they have moved away from “checking the box” to viewing learning as change.

2019 Learning Elite
Accenture - Urszula Fabiszak
Urszula Fabiszak
2019 Learning Elite Number 8
Better Together
Through a partnership between its information security and learning functions, Accenture is preparing and educating employees about cybersecurity threats.
BY AVE RIO

Within global management consulting firm Accenture’s information security, or IS, corporate function, a behavior change team is in charge of increasing IS awareness and nurturing secure behaviors across the company. That’s where learning comes in. Through its IS Advocate program the behavior change team meets its objectives through employee completion of custom immersive learning activities.

Steve Zutovsky, managing director of internal IS at Accenture, said the training programs use the latest in learning technology, such as gamified environments and role-specific elements. “These features increase our learners’ willingness to participate because they feel the activities are fun and entertainment more so than learning,” he said. “I’m always intrigued by what the team is going to come up with next so that things don’t get stale.”

11
Department of Veterans Affairs Acquisition Academy
In response to identified skills gaps, VAAA launched the Senior Acquisition Leadership Training program to develop critical leadership competencies among VA’s senior contracting workforce. Its goal is to build leaders with the knowledge, skills and attitudes to transition from technical expert to strategic leader.

Company size: 360,000 Location: U.S.

12
Tata Consultancy Services
Inaugurated by CXOs, TCS’ Global Learning Week 2018 (designed to foster a spirit of learning and sharing) created a unique platform with games, quizzes, webinars and virtual conferences, allowing more than 25,000 employees to interact with more than 40 global leaders and become aware of all the learning avenues available.

Company size: 395,000 Location: India

13
Blue Cross and Blue Shield of North Carolina
In 2018, Blue Cross and Blue Shield of North Carolina worked with its claims area to improve claims payment processes and reduce errors and process flows that resulted in $9 million of savings in late payment interest.

Company size: 4,700 Location: U.S.

14
MTM Inc.
MTM Training implemented a four-month training series titled Set it Best! aimed at reducing costs by 6 percent in 2018. The program saved a total of $3 million, reducing costs more than 6 percent, and achieved a Kirkpatrick Level 4 result of 13 percent increase in net revenue.

Company size: 2,600 Location: U.S.

15
Hewlett Packard Enterprise
HPE’s L&D led the digital transformation of learning democratization. Business impact evaluations reflect a 5x improvement in learner engagement. HPE’s annual employee voice of workforce survey positioned HPE 14 points above industry in terms of employee satisfaction with access to learning and development experiences.

Company size: 60,000 Location: U.S.

16
CareSource
CareSource University’s Functional Facilitator program teaches facilitation skills to departmental subject matter experts throughout CareSource. Participants completing the program can support effective technical training within their department, which has resulted in a 93 percent reduction in scheduling and deliver time.

Company size: 4,200 Location: U.S.

17
G4S Secure Solutions (USA) Inc.
G4S is committed to the internal development of talented individuals. To support this effort, the G4S NA role leader program was implemented in 2017. To date, 42 employees have participated in the program with an impressive 98 percent retention rate and six promotions to senior leadership roles.

Company size: 59,000 Location: U.S.

18
Mountain America Credit Union
At 90 days post-training, newly trained FSRs are opening accounts with an average of 4.0 products and services, as compared to longer-term employees who are achieving 4.3 products and services per new account. Their job performance contributes to MACU being 5 percent above its year-to-date goal.

Company size: 2,300 Location: U.S.

11
Department of Veterans Affairs Acquisition Academy
In response to identified skills gaps, VAAA launched the Senior Acquisition Leadership Training program to develop critical leadership competencies among VA’s senior contracting workforce. Its goal is to build leaders with the knowledge, skills and attitudes to transition from technical expert to strategic leader.

Company size: 360,000 Location: U.S.

12
Tata Consultancy Services
Inaugurated by CXOs, TCS’ Global Learning Week 2018 (designed to foster a spirit of learning and sharing) created a unique platform with games, quizzes, webinars and virtual conferences, allowing more than 25,000 employees to interact with more than 40 global leaders and become aware of all the learning avenues available.

Company size: 395,000 Location: India

13
Blue Cross and Blue Shield of North Carolina
In 2018, Blue Cross and Blue Shield of North Carolina worked with its claims area to improve claims payment processes and reduce errors and process flows that resulted in $9 million of savings in late payment interest.

Company size: 4,700 Location: U.S.

14
MTM Inc.
MTM Training implemented a four-month training series titled Set it Best! aimed at reducing costs by 6 percent in 2018. The program saved a total of $3 million, reducing costs more than 6 percent, and achieved a Kirkpatrick Level 4 result of 13 percent increase in net revenue.

Company size: 2,600 Location: U.S.

15
Hewlett Packard Enterprise
HPE’s L&D led the digital transformation of learning democratization. Business impact evaluations reflect a 5x improvement in learner engagement. HPE’s annual employee voice of workforce survey positioned HPE 14 points above industry in terms of employee satisfaction with access to learning and development experiences.

Company size: 60,000 Location: U.S.

16
CareSource
CareSource University’s Functional Facilitator program teaches facilitation skills to departmental subject matter experts throughout CareSource. Participants completing the program can support effective technical training within their department, which has resulted in a 93 percent reduction in scheduling and deliver time.

Company size: 4,200 Location: U.S.

17
G4S Secure Solutions (USA) Inc.
G4S is committed to the internal development of talented individuals. To support this effort, the G4S NA role leader program was implemented in 2017. To date, 42 employees have participated in the program with an impressive 98 percent retention rate and six promotions to senior leadership roles.

Company size: 59,000 Location: U.S.

18
Mountain America Credit Union
At 90 days post-training, newly trained FSRs are opening accounts with an average of 4.0 products and services, as compared to longer-term employees who are achieving 4.3 products and services per new account. Their job performance contributes to MACU being 5 percent above its year-to-date goal.

Company size: 2,300 Location: U.S.

Leadership Styles
Leadership Styles
Stop trying to figure out what kind of leader you should be, and focus on what kind of leader your people need.
By Sarah Fister Gale
When high performers move into leadership roles, one of the first choices they need to make is what kind of leader they want to be — and there are a lot of options to choose from. Some imagine themselves visionary leaders, ready to guide their teams through rough waters, or democratic leaders who want to encourage collaboration and team decision-making. Others will lean toward transactional leadership, where delivering results is the measure of success.

The truth is all leadership styles can be good choices — in the right situation. Conversely, none of them work all the time. “Trying to label yourself with a single leadership style feels like ’60s-era thinking,” said Greg Githens, a strategic thinking coach with Catalyst and Cadre LLC in Lakewood Ranch, Florida. “Leadership is much more complicated than that.”

“The most successful leaders are able to adapt their leadership style to the situation,” agreed Robyn Benincasa, CEO of World Class Teams and a seasoned firefighter in San Diego. “They become the person their team needs them to be in that moment.”

Situational Leadership
While an inspirational and collaborative leader might be exactly what the team needs if a project calls for creativity and group effort, it can be destructive in situations where decisions need to be made quickly. “If I pull up to a building on fire, the last thing I want to hear from my captain is ‘let’s collaborate on how we should approach this fire as a team,’ ” Benincasa said. In cases of crisis, teams need decisive leaders who can make decisions for the group and inspire their people to follow them.

Leaders who are fluid in their approach are also better able to meet the needs of individuals on the team and their ability to address the tasks at hand, said Ken Blanchard, a columnist for Chief Learning Officer, best-selling author and founder of The Ken Blanchard Cos. “You can’t use one leadership style with every person and expect positive results.”

Leadership Styles
Leadership Styles
Stop trying to figure out what kind of leader you should be, and focus on what kind of leader your people need.
By Sarah Fister Gale
When high performers move into leadership roles, one of the first choices they need to make is what kind of leader they want to be — and there are a lot of options to choose from. Some imagine themselves visionary leaders, ready to guide their teams through rough waters, or democratic leaders who want to encourage collaboration and team decision-making. Others will lean toward transactional leadership, where delivering results is the measure of success.

The truth is all leadership styles can be good choices — in the right situation. Conversely, none of them work all the time. “Trying to label yourself with a single leadership style feels like ’60s-era thinking,” said Greg Githens, a strategic thinking coach with Catalyst and Cadre LLC in Lakewood Ranch, Florida. “Leadership is much more complicated than that.”

“The most successful leaders are able to adapt their leadership style to the situation,” agreed Robyn Benincasa, CEO of World Class Teams and a seasoned firefighter in San Diego. “They become the person their team needs them to be in that moment.”

Situational Leadership
While an inspirational and collaborative leader might be exactly what the team needs if a project calls for creativity and group effort, it can be destructive in situations where decisions need to be made quickly. “If I pull up to a building on fire, the last thing I want to hear from my captain is ‘let’s collaborate on how we should approach this fire as a team,’ ” Benincasa said. In cases of crisis, teams need decisive leaders who can make decisions for the group and inspire their people to follow them.

Leaders who are fluid in their approach are also better able to meet the needs of individuals on the team and their ability to address the tasks at hand, said Ken Blanchard, a columnist for Chief Learning Officer, best-selling author and founder of The Ken Blanchard Cos. “You can’t use one leadership style with every person and expect positive results.”

Case Study


A Quest for Success
By Rocio Villaseñor
E

nhancing a company’s growth begins with its leaders.

At Quest Diagnostics, a Fortune 500 health care company that provides diagnostics testing and clinical laboratory services worldwide, CEO Steve Rusckowski recognized that their senior leaders needed to break out of their functional roles and broaden their understanding of the organization’s value chain.

Rusckowski, who joined the company in 2012, said he noticed Quest was not growing and “didn’t have the structure and culture to be successful.” He determined there was a need to provide enterprisewide leadership development to Quest’s 400-plus senior executive leaders that aligned with the company’s vision, goals and strategy.

At the end of 2014, Rusckowski initiated the call for the LeadingQuest Academy.

Business Intelligence


Elite Organizations Come in All Shapes and Sizes
The best learning organizations are doing a lot with a little.
By Ashley St. John
O

rganizations ranging from a couple hundred to hundreds of thousands of employees are represented each year among Chief Learning Officer’s LearningElite, the magazine’s annual list of high-performing learning organizations. The companies span industries and the globe itself, and each year is a reminder that there is no one formula for becoming an elite learning function.

A look back at several years of data shows organization type, size and budget vary, but many critical learning priorities are shared — specifically, supporting engagement, reskilling efforts and developing a use case for all tech initiatives.

Since 2011, the LearningElite has ranked and benchmarked organizations that employ effective workforce development strategies with demonstrable business results. Developed by Chief Learning Officer editors and members of the LearningElite Advisory Board, the program evaluates organizations based on learning strategy, leadership commitment, learning execution, learning impact and business performance results.

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In Conclusion


How the World Cup Teaches Us Role Clarity

It’s the key to developing a winning team By John Gillis Jr.

John Gillis Jr. is a management consultant with LeadershipX.

John Gillis Jr. is a management consultant with LeadershipX. He recently co-authored “Powerhouse” with Olympic gold medalist and world champion soccer player Kristine Lilly and business school dean Lynette Gillis.
He can be reached at editor@CLOmedia.com.

A

s we watch women from all over the world compete this June at the World Cup in France, I am reminded that it’s the 20th anniversary of the United States’ historic win over China in 1999 at the Rose Bowl in Pasadena, California.

In front of 90,000 screaming fans, Brandi Chastain scored the fifth and final goal for her team to beat China, a shot that would change their lives forever. Chastain spontaneously took off her jersey in celebration and dropped to her knees, flexing her arms with fists clenched. While this is very common in men’s soccer, for a woman sans jersey in a sports bra, it was novel. The goal Chastain scored brought relief and complete happiness. Yet, it wasn’t about Chastain and her individual achievement. She had played a role, as did each of the 20 players on the team.

Thanks for reading our June 2019 issue!