March 2018

March 2018

Editor’s Letter


Are You Experienced?

T

he CLO role is full of exciting opportunities.

A host of pressing business issues sit right in the center of learning leaders’ wheelhouses. Finding and developing future leaders, turbocharging the speed and innovation capabilities of the workforce, identifying critical skill gaps and serving up a compelling and engaging set of personalized learning assets, to name just a few.

But to my mind one of the greatest opportunities is the learning experience.

It’s no secret that more and more learning happens online as digital technology worms its way into every aspect of our daily lives. What once required me to get off the couch and look in a book became instantly available via the supercharged mobile device in my pants pocket. Now I don’t even need to reach for that anymore. I simply shout to the empty air, “Alexa, why is the sky blue?”

Sponsored Content


Don’t Lose Sight of Competence and Connection in a Digital World

By Leah Clark, Director, Strategy & Development
BlessingWhite, A Division of GP Strategies

I

t’s no surprise to anyone that digital transformation is likely to continue with increasingly profound impact on how organizations conduct business. This disruption is massive, requiring new rules for operating in a digital world as well as changing how employees and customers want to interact with organizations. As a result, businesses need to shift to a new way of working.

A recent Harvard Business Review study indicated that “70% of CEOs believe they do not have the right skills, leader, or operating structure to adapt.” As organizations evolve and try to figure out how to shift to a digital business leadership model—from recruiting and sales to customer service and internal communications—what are the implications for the leaders of these organizations? How does leadership change in a digital age? And what skills will become most critical to lead successfully?

March 2018 | Volume 17, Issue 2

CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER
John R. Taggart
jrtag@CLOmedia.com

PRESIDENT
Kevin A. Simpson
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Vice President, GROUP PUBLISHER
Clifford Capone
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VICE PRESIDENT, EDITOR IN CHIEF
Mike Prokopeak
mikep@CLOmedia.com

Editorial Director
Rick Bell
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Managing Editor
Ashley St. John
astjohn@CLOmedia.com

SENIOR EDITOR
Lauren Dixon
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ASSOCIATE EDITORS
Andie Burjek
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Ave Rio
ario@CLOmedia.com

COPY EDITOR
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editorial art director
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Video and Multimedia Producer
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Editorial InternS
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Mariel Tishma
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Vice President, RESEARCH & Advisory Services
Sarah Kimmel
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RESEARCH MANAGER
Tim Harnett
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Data Scientist
Grey Litaker
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Research Content Specialist
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Media & Production Manager
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Production Coordinator
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VICE PRESIDENT, EVENTS
Trey Smith
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Events Content Coordinator
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BUSINESS MANAGER
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Regional Sales ManagerS
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Robert Stevens
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Director, Business Development 
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Audience Development Director
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CONTRIBUTING WRITERS
Philios Andreou
Craig M. Arndt
Ken Blanchard
Agatha Bordonaro
Mekayla Castro
Alan Friedman
Theano V. Kalavana
Elliott Masie
Lee Maxey
Breeda McGrath
Bob Mosher
Marygrace Schumann
Justin Small
Kelly Torres
Joseph D. Zuckerman

CHIEF LEARNING OFFICER EDITORIAL ADVISORY BOARD

Cedric Coco, EVP, Chief People Officer, Brookdale Senior Living Inc.
Lisa Doyle, Head of Retail Training, Ace Hardware
David DeFilippo, Chief People and Learning Officer, Suffolk
Tamar Elkeles, Chief Talent Executive, Atlantic Bridge Capital
Thomas Evans, (Ret.) Chief Learning Officer, PricewaterhouseCoopers
Gerry Hudson-Martin, Director, Corporate Learning Strategies, Business Architects
Kimo Kippen, President, Aloha Learning Advisors
Rob Lauber, Vice President, Chief Learning Officer, McDonald’s Corp.
Maj. Gen. Erwin F. Lessel, (Ret.) U.S. Air Force, Director, Deloitte Consulting
Justin Lombardo, (Ret.) Chief Learning Officer, Baptist Health
Adri Maisonet-Morales, Vice President, Enterprise Learning and Development, Blue Cross Blue Shield of North Carolina
Alan Malinchak, CEO, Éclat Transitions LLC and STRATactical LLC
Lee Maxey, CEO, MindMax
Bob Mosher, Senior Partner and Chief Learning Evangelist, APPLY Synergies
Rebecca Ray, Executive Vice President, The Conference Board
Allison Rossett, (Ret.) Professor of Educational Technology, San Diego State University
Diana Thomas, CEO and Founder, Winning Results
David Vance, Executive Director, Center for Talent Reporting
Kevin D. Wilde, Executive Leadership Fellow, Carlson School of Management, University of Minnesota
James P. Woolsey, President, Defense Aquisition University

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20


Profile

Agatha Bordonaro
A true believer in the power of education, Nick van Dam makes an indelible mark on McKinsey and the L&D profession.

52


Case Study

Craig M. Arndt
Defense Acquisition University has made research into evolving practices a core part of its educational mission.

54


Business Intelligence

Mike Prokopeak
Learning organizations continue to measure learning activity and satisfaction while neglecting broader business performance.

Features

16
Joseph D. Zuckerman, Alan Friedman and Mekayla Castro
Physicians play a key organizational role yet are often ill-prepared to take on the leadership mantle. More focus on insight and introspection can tackle the challenge.
30
Marygrace Schumann
L&D teams have traditionally shied away from diversity and inclusion work. That’s starting to change.
36
Ave Rio
The growing power and sophistication of virtual reality spotlights the need to plan and experiment with this emerging technology.
42
Kelly Torres and Breeda McGrath
As more learning happens online, organizations need to focus on the user experience and design of digital learning to actively engage learners.
48
Theano V. Kalavana and Philios Andreou
Empathy in business works but only if leaders use the right type at the appropriate level.

Experts

10
Elliott Masie
Peeling Back the Layers
11
Bob Mosher
The 3-Legged Stool Is Balanced and Ready.
12
Ken Blanchard
The Rise of the Servant Leader
14
Lee Maxey
The College Oversell Crisis
58
Justin Small
The Employee Experience Imperative

Resources

4
Are You Experienced?

Are you a part of the CLO Network?

imperatives


Peeling Back the Layers

Inject more experimentation and agility with limited risk By Elliott Masie

Elliott Masie is the chairman and CLO of The Masie Center’s Learning Consortium and CEO of The Masie Center, an international think tank focused on learning and workplace productivity. He can be reached at editor@CLOmedia.com.

I

magine adding layers of new learning content, context and interaction to your LMS — without a major upgrade or expensive integration.

Imagine offering your learners the machine learning expertise of IBM’s Watson or Amazon’s Alexa by adding a layer of technology that would seamlessly weave through your existing workplace technology.

Imagine your employees who graduated from business programs at institutions like Wharton, Harvard or UCLA being able to add a personalized layer of content, curation and collaboration to their technology workspaces that would enhance their learning experiences.

Imagine a business unit’s ability to offer a gamification layer that would provide enterprisewide content for a cluster of employees, adding a powerful engagement strategy for a targeted group of the workforce.

Finally, imagine being able to inject a layer of content in the native language of some of your employees. That layer could live alongside or even replace English content for specific learners who want a deeper, native-language exploration of a topic.

selling up, selling down


The 3-Legged Stool Is Balanced and Ready

Workflow learning presents a huge opportunity By Bob Mosher

Bob Mosher is a senior partner and chief learning evangelist for APPLY Synergies, a strategic consulting firm. He can be reached at editor@CLOmedia.com.

A

colleague of mine recently asked me, “Are we our own worst enemy when it comes to leading, adapting and innovating?” My answer: “All too often.”

Now, I know that sounds pretty harsh and negative, but let me share a perspective. As I’ve watched my parents age, I’ve watched their filters come off. Those of you who have elderly parents likely know exactly what I mean. Their words used to be a bit more thought out, careful and guarded. Not anymore!

As I age in this business, my filters are coming off too. I used to be a lot more tolerant of our complaining about the attention we think we deserve and the credibility we feel we’ve earned. Before you think I’m finger-pointing, notice that I used “our” and “we” because I’m including myself in this statement. I’ve had to swallow some of my pride and examine exactly why I wasn’t having the impact of which I was capable.

leadership


The Rise of the Servant Leader

Servant leadership benefits people and builds better organizations By ken blanchard

Ken Blanchard is chief spiritual officer of The Ken Blanchard Cos. and co-author of “Collaboration Begins with You: Be a Silo Buster.”
He can be reached at editor@CLOmedia.com.

T

he practice of management and leadership is constantly evolving.

During the Industrial Revolution of the 19th century, efficient production of goods was the name of the game. Leaders saw their role as getting workers to produce the most goods in the shortest amount of time.

In the 20th century, information became as important as materials, leading to what my friend and mentor Peter Drucker called knowledge work. People were no longer viewed as mere “hired hands,” and managers had to learn to encourage and inspire those who worked with them.

I would like to think that the 21st century will be remembered as a time when leaders realize that in order to produce the greatest results for their employees, their customers and our planet, they must serve rather than be served.

Making the grade


The College Oversell Crisis

A middle-class level of wealth should not be a matter of degrees By Lee maxey

Lee Maxey is CEO of MindMax, a marketing and enrollment management services company. He can be reached at editor@CLOmedia.com.

L

ike the dream of homeownership for all, which drove America’s 2001-06 housing bubble and its subsequent collapse, many sectors of the U.S. economy currently are overpitching four-year degrees. According to analytics software company Burning Glass Technologies, 31 percent of postings for IT help desk roles request a bachelor’s degree. But when Burning Glass compared the job postings that ask for a B.A. with those that do not, the exact same technical skills were specified for both.

I dislike this trend for two reasons. First, it devalues a postsecondary degree — even a two-year degree — when employers require hires to have credentials beyond what’s necessary to perform well in a job. Second, there is a needless barrier to entry for those with a high school diploma who are able to perform a job paying a living wage.

Self-Awareness:

The ladder to leadership success

Physicians play a key organizational role yet are often ill-prepared to take on the leadership mantle. They’re not alone. More focus on insight and introspection in health care and business at large can tackle the challenge.

By Joseph D. Zuckerman, Alan Friedman and Mekayla Castro

For the past two U.S. presidential administrations, health care has been a contentious issue. National dialogue and federal policy shifts have caused change to continuously ripple throughout the health care industry.

In part due to the ongoing change, the terms “transparency” and “accountability” have become part of the daily dialogue for workers in health-related fields with a focus on how to improve. In fact, there’s been so much discussion and change that more new words are entering health care management vocabulary: “engagement” and “burnout.”

We keep trying new things to engage workers and better serve patients. But the majority of those efforts are doomed from the start. In the book “Who Killed Change?,” Ken Blanchard and co-authors noted that as much as 70 percent of change initiatives fail.

Through all these conversations and interventions one key element has been missing — something so central to work that it seems impossible we’ve overlooked it. There hasn’t been much talk about self-awareness and the role it plays in the key issues we keep trying to tackle, be it resilience, accountability or something as basic as patient safety and satisfaction in health care.

Self-Awareness:

The ladder to leadership success

Physicians play a key organizational role yet are often ill-prepared to take on the leadership mantle. They’re not alone. More focus on insight and introspection in health care and business at large can tackle the challenge.

By Joseph D. Zuckerman, Alan Friedman and Mekayla Castro

For the past two U.S. presidential administrations, health care has been a contentious issue. National dialogue and federal policy shifts have caused change to continuously ripple throughout the health care industry.

In part due to the ongoing change, the terms “transparency” and “accountability” have become part of the daily dialogue for workers in health-related fields with a focus on how to improve. In fact, there’s been so much discussion and change that more new words are entering health care management vocabulary: “engagement” and “burnout.”

We keep trying new things to engage workers and better serve patients. But the majority of those efforts are doomed from the start. In the book “Who Killed Change?,” Ken Blanchard and co-authors noted that as much as 70 percent of change initiatives fail.

Through all these conversations and interventions one key element has been missing — something so central to work that it seems impossible we’ve overlooked it. There hasn’t been much talk about self-awareness and the role it plays in the key issues we keep trying to tackle, be it resilience, accountability or something as basic as patient safety and satisfaction in health care.

Profile


A Life of Learning

A true believer in the power of education, Nick van Dam makes an indelible mark on McKinsey and the L&D profession at large.

By Agatha Bordonaro

photos by Saskia Aukema

Chances are, if you were to reflect on the times in your life that felt most fulfilling, you would recall that you were in the middle of learning.

“If you look at all the studies on happiness, there are three things that make people happy,” Nick van Dam said. “One relates to people continuing to grow in their lives. Another relates to people having social relationships: spending time with friends, family, colleagues. The third is about having meaning and purpose in one’s life.

“If you think about it, learning plays a role in all of that,” he continued. “I think that’s very exciting.”

Van Dam would know. With a master’s degree in sociology and psychology, a doctorate in human capital development, an adjunct professorship and advisory board membership at the University of Pennsylvania’s PennCLO Executive Doctoral Program, and a professorship of corporate learning and development at the Netherlands’ Nyenrode Business Universiteit — not to mention nearly 20 books and countless articles and workshops to his name — the 30-year industry veteran is a true believer in the transcendental power of learning.

Organizational Collaboration’s Dirty Little Secret

Much of your company’s collaborative success can be chalked up to only 4 percent of your employees. And those employees aren’t too happy about it.

By Carole Bernstein, The Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania

Across companies and sectors, people are being told that collaboration and teamwork are critical to their company’s future. The time spent by managers and employees in collaborative activities has ballooned by at least 50 percent in the past two decades.

But in fact, a small number of employees are shouldering the collaborative burden, according to the recent Harvard Business Review article “Collaborative Overload” by Rob Cross of the McIntire School of Commerce and Reb Rebele and Adam Grant of the Wharton School. In a study of over 300 organizations, the authors found that 20 to 35 percent of value-added collaborations are being generated by only 3 to 5 percent of employees.

High Tech, High Touch: The Power of People in the Digital Era

More than 90 percent of organizations expect digital impact in the next two years. Does your business have the right people strategy in place to be successful?

By ManpowerGroup

We’ve been here before…

If today’s digital disruption seems familiar, that’s because it’s not the first time technology has shaken up our world. During the Industrial Revolution, it took 50 years for industries to redefine processes and scale technologies. Today’s organizations don’t have that luxury of time. Shorter business cycles challenge organizations in six months or less to either change or fail.

More than 90 percent of employers expect digital impact in the next two years.¹ As digitization advances automation and computing, 75 percent of leaders believe automation will soon require new skills.² Skilling up will require a high level of learnability; across the OECD, jobs requiring greater proficiencies are growing the fastest.³ Younger workers are coming into this environment. By 2030, millennials will make up two-thirds of the workforce,⁴ and they’ll need a high degree of learnability: 65 percent of the jobs they’ll fill over their lifetimes don’t even exist yet.⁵

Putting a Plan Together

Case study: How Mackenzie Investments developed a succession pipeline for its inside sales department

By Tim Harnett

How important is succession planning and employee development at your organization? More than three-quarters of organizations (78 percent) have some sort of plan in place, yet 60 percent say they have too few candidates for their needs.¹ Developing employees and promoting from within is crucial to keeping successful employees in house and reducing knowledge loss.

For Denise Teixeira, senior manager, product education and blended solutions for distribution at Mackenzie Investments, promoting people to internal sales roles benefits both customers and the organization. “Executives discuss how important professional development has been in their careers, growing them into the leaders they are today. They wanted an initiative that would provide an opportunity to develop employees to be promotion ready to move into the inside wholesaler role — a role that requires deep product and industry knowledge.”

Content Sponsored By GP Strategies

Learning in Practice Award Spotlight

Havas Health & You Develops Emerging Leaders for Long-Term Success

Havas Health & You partnered with BlessingWhite, a division of GP Strategies, to establish a comprehensive leadership development program to enhance leadership skills and encourage leaders to pay forward what they learned to support future executives.

The Challenge

Great advertising campaigns for clients start with great input from talent. No one knows this better than advertising agency Havas, whose employees’ creative genius and intellectual capital are what drive its business.

As the brains behind such memorable campaigns as Dos Equis’ “Most Interesting Man in the World” and TJX Companies’ “Bring Back the Holidays,” workers at Havas must be continually inspired and motivated to propel the firm’s success.

So when Havas launched its newly expanded and branded Havas Health & You practice, which combined its separate global consumer health agencies under one umbrella, the talent management team knew it would need to identify and cultivate each agency’s future leaders for long-term success.

Diversity Is

Learning’s Business

L&D teams have traditionally shied away from diversity and inclusion work. That’s starting to change as companies discover that difference is a source of competitive advantage.

By Marygrace Schumann

In an increasingly polarized world, differences have become an opportunity to sow discord rather than promote dialogue.

This is particularly true in the workplace. In 2017, the #MeToo movement went viral, laying bare the scale of sexual harassment and abuse across the country, especially in the workplace. In today’s world of work, many employees post anonymous comments to employer review sites like Glassdoor or turn to chat forums like Blind to air grievances rather than confront their employers directly.

This mistrust is one of the reasons why diversity and inclusion has taken a new air of importance at work, yet many corporate learning and development functions have traditionally steered clear of the topic, leaving it to HR or a dedicated diversity function. According to Steve Pemberton, chief human resources officer at social recognition provider Globoforce and former chief diversity officer at Walgreens Boots Alliance, organizations tend to treat L&D and D&I as independent functions within HR.

Diversity Is

Learning’s Business

L&D teams have traditionally shied away from diversity and inclusion work. That’s starting to change as companies discover that difference is a source of competitive advantage.

By Marygrace Schumann

In an increasingly polarized world, differences have become an opportunity to sow discord rather than promote dialogue.

This is particularly true in the workplace. In 2017, the #MeToo movement went viral, laying bare the scale of sexual harassment and abuse across the country, especially in the workplace. In today’s world of work, many employees post anonymous comments to employer review sites like Glassdoor or turn to chat forums like Blind to air grievances rather than confront their employers directly.

This mistrust is one of the reasons why diversity and inclusion has taken a new air of importance at work, yet many corporate learning and development functions have traditionally steered clear of the topic, leaving it to HR or a dedicated diversity function. According to Steve Pemberton, chief human resources officer at social recognition provider Globoforce and former chief diversity officer at Walgreens Boots Alliance, organizations tend to treat L&D and D&I as independent functions within HR.

The growing power and sophistication of virtual reality spotlights the need to plan and experiment with this emerging technology.

By Ave Rio

Virtual reality for learning is no longer an abstract concept — it’s here. It’s already being used to train surgeons, help retail workers prepare for Black Friday craziness, keep construction workers safer and even help quarterbacks improve their game.

According to one expert, virtual reality is the first real disruptive technology in learning, breaking away from the flat-screen mode of learning and hacking the senses to enter a three-dimensional world filled with sights and sound.

“It will be on par with the change that the internet brought to the industry, if not bigger,” said Anders Gronstedt, president of digital training consultancy The Gronstedt Group.

The internet, paired with personal computers and mobile devices, has until now mainly taken the traditional classroom model for learning and repurposed it in a new medium, he said. Virtual reality has the potential to fundamentally change how learning happens. By strapping on a VR headset, learners step into an immersive computer-generated world that can serve as a virtual rehearsal space for learning.

The growing power and sophistication of virtual reality spotlights the need to plan and experiment with this emerging technology.

By Ave Rio

Virtual reality for learning is no longer an abstract concept — it’s here. It’s already being used to train surgeons, help retail workers prepare for Black Friday craziness, keep construction workers safer and even help quarterbacks improve their game.

According to one expert, virtual reality is the first real disruptive technology in learning, breaking away from the flat-screen mode of learning and hacking the senses to enter a three-dimensional world filled with sights and sound.

“It will be on par with the change that the internet brought to the industry, if not bigger,” said Anders Gronstedt, president of digital training consultancy The Gronstedt Group.

The internet, paired with personal computers and mobile devices, has until now mainly taken the traditional classroom model for learning and repurposed it in a new medium, he said. Virtual reality has the potential to fundamentally change how learning happens. By strapping on a VR headset, learners step into an immersive computer-generated world that can serve as a virtual rehearsal space for learning.

Duke University’s senior fellow and founder of Change Academy, Dan Heath, the New York Times best-selling author discusses the impact of certain moments and how we could be the creators of richer experiences in his latest book,“Power of Moments.”

What is the power of a moment?

Moments are powerful because they define experiences. Think back to a recent vacation and how a few special moments from that trip capture the joy of the experience even as most of it has faded from memory. Great experiences hinge on “peak” moments — moments that arise above the rest. So when we talk about creating better experiences for other people, whether students or employees or customers, we’re really talking about creating peak moments.

How can a moment that occurs in such a short period of time have such a profound impact on one’s entire life?

Not all peak moments change your life but some do. Usually those are moments of insight. In an instant, we realize something that changes our view of ourselves or our world. And while many of those moments seem to come serendipitously, there are strategies we can use to create powerful moments of insight for ourselves and others.

By Kelly Torres and Breeda McGrath

As more learning happens online, organizations need to increase focus on the user experience and design of digital learning to actively engage learners.

The popularity of online learning and training has exploded in recent years. Due to the increase of online learners, it is important to ask whether our instructional approaches have evolved from face-to-face settings. If not, we need to ask what’s needed to implement new instructional strategies to effectively engage online learners.

How can we structure online learning environments, including workplaces, to meet the unique needs of our current generation of learners? Technology-savvy learners are entering the workforce with digital expectations and are constantly seeking information and connecting with others through online platforms. And it’s not just new entrants to the workforce. Online learning environments are becoming more attractive to students at all levels of formal and informal education and to employees who want to further their professional development skills. The rise of user experience, or UX, as a core principle of digital design has added more urgency.

With the advancement of technology, we can now gain new expertise at any time in any place. Meeting the needs of our digital learners goes beyond simply providing didactic or instructional lectures to technology-enhanced approaches. Many companies can’t use online approaches such as recorded lectures but they want their employees to be able to apply their new skills instantly to their current jobs. This is particularly important in fields such as information technology and medical professions that are constantly evolving and have limited time or resources to develop or revise their materials and workshops. Online training is becoming more popular since it is easier to quickly disseminate updated information and resources in a cost-efficient manner.

Empathy in business works but only if leaders use the right type at the appropriate level.

By Theano V. Kalavana and Philios Andreou

Not all empathy is created equal. Psychologists recognize two kinds of empathy: affective and cognitive. Great leadership hinges on understanding the difference and how to harness the unique power of each.

Affective empathy involves stepping into another person’s emotional state (“I feel your pain”). Cognitive empathy requires a genuine understanding of someone else’s condition (“I see what you mean”). Both types have their place in business but the most effective leaders emphasize cognitive over affective empathy.

Just as there is more than one kind of empathy there is more than one way to fail at empathy. For argument’s sake, let’s consider the hypothetical example of Jenny and Simon, two rising stars at an international manufacturing company who both saw their career trajectory stall because of flawed management styles.

Empathy in business works but only if leaders use the right type at the appropriate level.

By Theano V. Kalavana and Philios Andreou

Not all empathy is created equal. Psychologists recognize two kinds of empathy: affective and cognitive. Great leadership hinges on understanding the difference and how to harness the unique power of each.

Affective empathy involves stepping into another person’s emotional state (“I feel your pain”). Cognitive empathy requires a genuine understanding of someone else’s condition (“I see what you mean”). Both types have their place in business but the most effective leaders emphasize cognitive over affective empathy.
Just as there is more than one kind of empathy there is more than one way to fail at empathy. For argument’s sake, let’s consider the hypothetical example of Jenny and Simon, two rising stars at an international manufacturing company who both saw their career trajectory stall because of flawed management styles.

Case Study


Beyond the Lab

By Craig M. Arndt

T

raditionally, research is the domain of major academic universities, not corporate universities. We conjure images of people dressed in lab coats at places like Johns Hopkins University and Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

The time has come for corporate universities to take a fresh look at research in order to meet the needs of their students and address the increasing challenges of new technology and rapidly changing business models. At Defense Acquisition University, the Virginia-based education arm of the United States Department of Defense, we’ve begun to take on the challenge and are making research into new practices a fundamental part of our mission.

Business Intelligence


Measurement, Meet Management

Learning organizations continue to measure learning activity and satisfaction while neglecting broader business performance.

By Mike Prokopeak

O

ne of the most popular management maxims is, “If you can’t measure it, you can’t manage it.” Usually and apparently falsely attributed to management guru Peter Drucker, it nonetheless pops up in management speak and business circles far and wide.

Regardless of source, chief learning officers have taken it to heart. Ever since Don Kirkpatrick’s eponymous learning evaluation model roared out of Wisconsin in the 1950s, learning professionals have been busily standardizing, collecting and analyzing a host of learning outputs from smile sheets and course assessments to behavior change and productivity measures.

But widespread practice hasn’t necessarily translated to effective management. Many learning organizations continue to measure outcomes of learning activity and learner satisfaction while neglecting broader business performance results such as sales or product quality.

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in conclusion


The Employee Experience Imperative

Culture is at the heart of digital transformation BY JUSTIN SMALL

Justin Small is chief strategy officer at The BIO Agency, a London-based agency that helps companies develop digital strategy. He can be reached at editor@CLOmedia.com.

S

uccessful digital transformation rests on four pillars: technology, operations, customer experience and culture. The last one is the most challenging to get right.

Implementing a cultural transformation in response to commercial problems or market disruption is difficult because changing culture implies changing people. But an organized and engaged employee experience, or EX, culture can deliver major benefits.

Getting it wrong is dangerous. Culture doesn’t just eat strategy for lunch. It will have operations and customer experience for breakfast, too. Investing in employee experience is crucial. Employees are no longer the malleable delivery function of a product or service. They’re central to the delivery of competitive customer experience and the CLO can be a force in building digital solutions alongside cultural and behavioral changes.

Thanks for reading our March 2018 issue!