March 2019
March 2019

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earning & Development leaders from around the world tell us that preparing the next generation of leaders may be the most important mission they have today. They need leaders who can inspire confidence, drive innovation, and engage teams.

Editor’s Letter


Pardon the Interruption
H

ere’s a fun experiment. Pick someone at work — preferably a person with a looming deadline or even better someone heading up a big project. Ask if they’ve got a couple of hours for training.

If you’re lucky, you walk away with all your body parts intact. The reality is even people in less stressful positions wouldn’t look favorably on that same request.

As should be expected, learning professionals spend a lot of time on learning. They talk to people about it, research it, test it, implement it, measure the results of it, and then talk to people some more about it.

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MARCH 2019 | Volume 18, Issue 2

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10


Kathleen Gallo of Northwell Health shares her career journey; Kellogg School of Management’s Fred Harburg talks about facilitating a growth mindset; and what people are reading these days.
28


Profile

Sarah Fister Gale
Service-focused CLO Trish “Doc” Holliday is transforming her state’s government into a leading-edge learning organization.

48


Case Study

Sarah Fister Gale
Cognizant is partnering with nonprofit Per Scholas to close its tech talent gap.

50


Business Intelligence

Ashley St. John
A disconnect between learning and tangible business outcomes is partially to blame for dissatisfaction with measurement practices.

Features

22
Ave Rio
Lack of representation poses a problem for corporate learning teams often viewed as ambassadors of culture and organizational strategy.
32
Sarah Fister Gale
Big corporations are partnering with universities to help employees get their degrees.
38
James D. Kirkpatrick and Wendy Kayser Kirkpatrick
Fear and lack of discipline can cost a learning function respect, budget, jobs and, in the end, its own existence.
44
Mark Marone
The workforce needs to be prepared for the human-machine partnerships of the future. When the discussion turns to AI, L&D leaders should be speaking up — not stepping out.

Experts

14
Elliott Masie
Cybersecurity: Learning’s Imperative
16
Bob Mosher
Sick and Tired of Trends
18
Ken Blanchard
The Power of Beliefs
20
Lee Maxey
You Want Student Athletes on Your Team
54
Nick Morgan
Is This Thing On?

Resources

4
Pardon the Interruption
Your Career


Your Career


Career Advice From

Kathleen Gallo

SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT AND CHIEF LEARNING OFFICER, NORTHWELL HEALTH

Kathleen Gallo, senior vice president and chief learning officer for Northwell Health, shares her career journey and how she came into L&D.
Career Advice from Kathleen Gallo
Kathleen Gallo

What’s been your carrer path?

I am formally educated in nursing as well as in business. My clinical expertise was in emergency and trauma nursing — so for the first 25 years of my career, I was in emergency medicine as well as emergency management and emergency medical services. I spent many years on the frontline and went from a staff nurse all the way up to a vice president. It prepared me for my chief learning officer role because I came from operations and understand the health care culture and exactly what it’s like to deliver our services to our communities.

Circle graph and Bar Graph
The most important part of learning is…
That the pedagogy needs to be evidence-based and anchored in the science of learning.
The most overrated trend in L&D is…
Thinking people are actually learning through lectures or e-learning exclusively.
The most underrated trend in L&D is…
That bringing people from operations into the learning space is extremely valuable to organizational development.
Your Career


Your Career


What Are You Reading?
The Miracle Morning Hardcover Book
The Miracle Morning
By Hal Elrod
I am going through a career transition and this book is helping me be more accountable for taking control of my mornings. Sometimes I feel I am in the movie “Groundhog Day” with each day producing the same result. This book is a great motivator to move your days (and life) in a productive direction so you feel your best, produce your best and give your best! What am I learning? Here are three key takeaways from this book:
  • Find the time to focus on your personal development. Leverage the morning to create habits for fulfillment by taking dedicated time prior to each day.
  • Have an impactful circle of influence. Seek out people who provide positivity to your life and support you in your journey. Then, support them in the same way.
  • Be clear on your deepest “whys” to move toward the life you want. To help with moving toward your whys, create affirmations and read them daily.

This book continues to offer such insight since I am a full-time working mom. I am slowly integrating concepts from the book to make the most of my day. I am a work in progress.

Your Career


Your Career


Top of Mind
The Growth Mindset Culture for Leadership Development By Fred Harburg
Fred Harburg is a clinical professor at the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University and the former executive director of the Kellogg Executive Leadership Institute. He previously served as chief learning officer and president of Motorola University, CLO at Williams Energy, and senior vice president for leadership and learning at Fidelity Investments.

Leadership development efforts typically begin by honoring the ancient Greek exhortation to know thyself. Virtually all leadership development programs start with a self-assessment or personal reflection activity. However, these assessments can lead to a bias that places people in limiting boxes. The self may be far more fluid than has been assumed, and we may have paid too little attention to organizational culture as a powerful molding influence on leadership development.

Fred Harburg on the The Growth Mindset Culture for Leadership Development.
Fred Harburg on the The Growth Mindset Culture for Leadership Development.

imperatives


Cybersecurity: Learning’s Imperative

Cybersecurity-focused learning is on the horizon By Elliott Masie

Chief Learning Officer author, Elliot Masie's headshot.

Elliott Masie is CEO of The Masie Center, an international think tank focused on learning and workplace productivity, and chairman and CLO of The Masie Center’s Learning Consortium.
He can be reached at editor@CLOmedia.com.

W

ithin the next 24 months, your employees will need highly targeted and continuous learning and performance resources focused on cybersecurity.

This will be a significant and disruptive shift in the drivers and sponsorships of workplace learning. Currently most learning is triggered by compliance or regulatory needs, development of leadership candidates, new skills for employees and systems changes. But the dangerous world of cyberthreats will require learning and development departments to adjust and expand their focus, content, resources and expertise — to be on the front line of readiness to keep employees and the enterprise safe and secure.

However, we can’t teach “be safe” skills in an environment where the sources of threats change constantly and instantly. Consider the following.

selling up, selling down


Sick and Tired of Trends

Five goals for L&D this year By Bob Mosher

Chief Learning Officer author, Bob Mosher's headshot.

Bob Mosher is a senior partner and chief learning evangelist for APPLY Synergies, a strategic consulting firm.
He can be reached at editor@CLOmedia.com.

T

rend articles, blogs and columns are like New Year’s resolutions. They come and go every January through April, approximately. I recently Googled “learning trends in 2019” and was met with 466,000 hits. I’m not faulting the effort or sincerity of the intent of these articles. I’m just sick of trends in general. That’s no one’s fault. It’s a fault in our industry.

Here’s my issue with our industry and trends. They rarely truly change, and if they do, it’s way too slowly. So in the spirit of bucking the trends (sorry for that), I’m simply going to offer five things I wish we’d take a leadership position on and actually do.

leadership


The Power of Beliefs

Adapting to change in work and life By ken blanchard

Ken Blanchard is chief spiritual officer of The Ken Blanchard Cos. and co-author of “Servant Leadership in Action.”
He can be reached at editor@CLOmedia.com.
L

ong before the term “mindset” became a business buzzword, Spencer Johnson, my co-author on “The One Minute Manager,” was preaching the power of beliefs and the impact they can have on behavior and the results you and your organization achieve.

Spencer used to tell audiences the story of two mouse-sized characters named Hem and Haw who lived in a maze and were faced with unexpected challenges when the cheese they loved suddenly disappeared. “Cheese” was a metaphor for whatever nourished you, whether it was a good job, a loving relationship, money, possessions, good health or peace of mind. The “maze” was a metaphor for whatever difficult situation was keeping you from finding and enjoying your cheese. How each character reacted to the missing cheese provided valuable lessons about fear and change.

Making the grade


You Want Student Athletes on Your Team

Valuing the hustle, grit and determination of the student athlete BY LEE MAXEY

Lee Maxey is CEO of MindMax, a marketing and enrollment management services company.
He can be reached at editor@CLOmedia.com.

M

arch Madness is upon us. Each year at this time, the annual NCAA Division I college tournament determines which men’s and women’s basketball team will be crowned national champions. After the celebrations end and graduations pass, what happens to the athletes?

According to the NCAA, last year, there were 492,000 college student athletes across Divisions I, II and III; fewer than 2 percent go on to compete in professional sports. In 2018, the graduation rate for NCAA student athletes ranged from 72 percent among Division II to 87 percent among Divisions I and III — that’s a rate, on average, says the NCAA, higher than the general student body.

L&D’s
Diversity
Dilemma
Lack of representation poses a problem for corporate learning teams viewed as ambassadors of culture and organizational strategy.
By Ave Rio

E lliott Masie was invited to give a keynote address in Taiwan at an Association for Talent Development leadership conference. When Masie arrived, he ran into leadership coach Marshall Goldsmith, who lives just three blocks from Masie in New York — only to find out that Goldsmith was the other keynote speaker at the same event.

Masie, CEO of The Masie Center, an international think tank focused on learning and workplace productivity, and a columnist for this publication, said the coincidence was funny but also sad. “Here we are in Taiwan, in Asia, where they were doing training and learning way before the U.S., and the two major keynoters they got were white guys over 60 from New York,” Masie said.

Masie’s experience highlights a lack of diversity in L&D, particularly among the thought leadership that represents the field. In fact, Chief Learning Officer data from its Talent Tracker service finds that 89 percent of learning and training managers are white. According to the data, 5.6 percent of learning managers are black, 9 percent are Hispanic or Latino, and 2.2 percent are Asian.

L&D’s
Diversity
Dilemma
Lack of representation poses a problem for corporate learning teams viewed as ambassadors of culture and organizational strategy.
By Ave Rio

E lliott Masie was invited to give a keynote address in Taiwan at an Association for Talent Development leadership conference. When Masie arrived, he ran into leadership coach Marshall Goldsmith, who lives just three blocks from Masie in New York — only to find out that Goldsmith was the other keynote speaker at the same event.

Masie, CEO of The Masie Center, an international think tank focused on learning and workplace productivity, and a columnist for this publication, said the coincidence was funny but also sad. “Here we are in Taiwan, in Asia, where they were doing training and learning way before the U.S., and the two major keynoters they got were white guys over 60 from New York,” Masie said.

Masie’s experience highlights a lack of diversity in L&D, particularly among the thought leadership that represents the field. In fact, Chief Learning Officer data from its Talent Tracker service finds that 89 percent of learning and training managers are white. According to the data, 5.6 percent of learning managers are black, 9 percent are Hispanic or Latino, and 2.2 percent are Asian.

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Profile


Trish Holliday Teaches Tennessee a Lesson

Service-focused CLO Trish ‘Doc’ Holliday is transforming her state’s government into a leading-edge learning organization.

By Sarah Fister Gale

CLO Trish ‘Doc’ Holliday

In 2012, Tennessee became the first state in the country to establish an official chief learning officer role, appointing Trish Holliday to the position. It was a decision that transformed the state’s approach to learning and one that has helped it attract top talent in a tight hiring environment. “I came here to revamp, rebuild and rebrand training for the state of Tennessee,” Holliday said.

In many ways Holliday had been preparing for this role most of her life. Her father was a missionary, and after completing her bachelor’s degree in sociology and her master’s degree in divinity, she spent 18 years working with him at Mountain TOP Ministries in Tennessee Appalachia. “That’s where I began to understand that my life’s work was to help people reach their full potential,” she said. During that time she created programs for local youth and families and helped build clean water systems and repair homes so the people of the community could live a better life.

Big corporations are partnering with universities to help employees get their degrees.
BY SARAH FISTER GALE

In November 2018 Uber announced a surprising new partnership with Arizona State University. The global ride-hailing service will now offer access to a fully funded college degree for Uber Pro drivers — and their families. That means drivers who meet the criteria of driving a certain number of hours per month and receive top passenger ratings can complete a full undergraduate degree through ASU Online or take part in non-degree courses through ASU’s Continuing and Professional Education program. They can also provide this benefit to a partner, child, grandchild or other family member.

This initiative didn’t begin as an education program, said Ali Wiezbowski, Uber’s head of driver engagement. Early in 2018, Uber announced a new corporate mission to “ignite opportunities that put the world in motion.”

“We realized that if we were going to stand behind that mission, we needed to bring it to life for drivers,” Wiezbowski said. So her team spent weeks interviewing hundreds of drivers about why they drove and what they aspired to achieve from the experience. Throughout those interviews two themes emerged, she said. “They come to the platform to provide for their families or to build a foundation for their own future.”

Big corporations are partnering with universities to help employees get their degrees.
BY SARAH FISTER GALE

In November 2018 Uber announced a surprising new partnership with Arizona State University. The global ride-hailing service will now offer access to a fully funded college degree for Uber Pro drivers — and their families. That means drivers who meet the criteria of driving a certain number of hours per month and receive top passenger ratings can complete a full undergraduate degree through ASU Online or take part in non-degree courses through ASU’s Continuing and Professional Education program. They can also provide this benefit to a partner, child, grandchild or other family member.

This initiative didn’t begin as an education program, said Ali Wiezbowski, Uber’s head of driver engagement. Early in 2018, Uber announced a new corporate mission to “ignite opportunities that put the world in motion.”

“We realized that if we were going to stand behind that mission, we needed to bring it to life for drivers,” Wiezbowski said. So her team spent weeks interviewing hundreds of drivers about why they drove and what they aspired to achieve from the experience. Throughout those interviews two themes emerged, she said. “They come to the platform to provide for their families or to build a foundation for their own future.”

Fear and lack of discipline can cost a learning function respect, budget, jobs and, in the end, its own existence. But this spiral can be avoided.
BY JAMES D. KIRKPATRICK AND WENDY KAYSER KIRKPATRICK

Eighty percent of training professionals believe that evaluating training results is important to their organization, according to the Association for Talent Development’s 2016 research report “Evaluating Learning: Getting to Measurements That Matter.” However, only 35 percent are confident that their training evaluation efforts meet organizational business goals.

The dramatic disparity between what learning professionals believe the business wants and what they deliver has been a relatively invariable dilemma for decades. Countless articles, white papers and programs address this issue and provide solutions that range from simple to complicated. So why does the problem still exist?

Two causes are frequently cited: a lack of discipline surrounding evaluation and a fear of evaluation among some professionals.

Fear and lack of discipline can cost a learning function respect, budget, jobs and, in the end, its own existence. But this spiral can be avoided.
BY JAMES D. KIRKPATRICK AND WENDY KAYSER KIRKPATRICK

Eighty percent of training professionals believe that evaluating training results is important to their organization, according to the Association for Talent Development’s 2016 research report “Evaluating Learning: Getting to Measurements That Matter.” However, only 35 percent are confident that their training evaluation efforts meet organizational business goals.

The dramatic disparity between what learning professionals believe the business wants and what they deliver has been a relatively invariable dilemma for decades. Countless articles, white papers and programs address this issue and provide solutions that range from simple to complicated. So why does the problem still exist?

Two causes are frequently cited: a lack of discipline surrounding evaluation and a fear of evaluation among some professionals.

Lack of discipline in evaluation is most often seen in corporations. A learning department receives an annual budget and uses it to deliver pleasant, professional experiences. However, they often are not asked to provide meaningful data to show how those experiences support the business, so they don’t. This carries on for a while, but eventually learning receives a summons to show how they contribute to the business. Generally, this results in continual budget slashing and other cost-cutting measures.

Shane Snow is an award-winning journalist, celebrated entrepreneur and the best-selling author of the books “Smartcuts: The Breakthrough Power of Lateral Thinking” and “DREAM TEAMS: Working Together Without Falling Apart,” as well as the co-author of “The Storytelling Edge.” He is founder-at-large of the content technology company Contently, and is a board member of The Hatch Institute, a nonprofit for investigative journalism in the public interest.

The workforce needs to be prepared for the human-machine partnerships of the future. When the discussion turns to AI, L&D leaders should be speaking up — not stepping out.

BY MARK MARONE

Artificial intelligence is changing the way people live and work, promising massive advances in accuracy, productivity and personalization by replicating human capabilities with information technology systems that can sense, reason, comprehend, learn and act. Organizations are eager to employ it, but business leaders who hope to benefit from the full potential of AI — including those responsible for developing human capital — have a lot to think about.

Expectations are high, but there is an undercurrent of skepticism. Technology has a history of producing unintended consequences. While AI has the capacity to transform work experiences for the better, it can also threaten the trust that underpins a healthy corporate culture and strong employee engagement.

Where Are We Now?

AI use is becoming widespread, including in automated logistics and warehousing systems, routine medical procedures, robotic manufacturing, chatbot technology, investment analysis, reporting and decision-making. Advances continue toward autonomous vehicles, Alexa and Siri have become like family, and music-streaming apps play our favorite new artists before we’ve ever heard of them.

The workforce needs to be prepared for the human-machine partnerships of the future. When the discussion turns to AI, L&D leaders should be speaking up — not stepping out.

BY MARK MARONE

Artificial intelligence is changing the way people live and work, promising massive advances in accuracy, productivity and personalization by replicating human capabilities with information technology systems that can sense, reason, comprehend, learn and act. Organizations are eager to employ it, but business leaders who hope to benefit from the full potential of AI — including those responsible for developing human capital — have a lot to think about.

Expectations are high, but there is an undercurrent of skepticism. Technology has a history of producing unintended consequences. While AI has the capacity to transform work experiences for the better, it can also threaten the trust that underpins a healthy corporate culture and strong employee engagement.

Where Are We Now?

AI use is becoming widespread, including in automated logistics and warehousing systems, routine medical procedures, robotic manufacturing, chatbot technology, investment analysis, reporting and decision-making. Advances continue toward autonomous vehicles, Alexa and Siri have become like family, and music-streaming apps play our favorite new artists before we’ve ever heard of them.

The workforce needs to be prepared for the human-machine partnerships of the future. When the discussion turns to AI, L&D leaders should be speaking up — not stepping out.

BY MARK MARONE

Artificial intelligence is changing the way people live and work, promising massive advances in accuracy, productivity and personalization by replicating human capabilities with information technology systems that can sense, reason, comprehend, learn and act. Organizations are eager to employ it, but business leaders who hope to benefit from the full potential of AI — including those responsible for developing human capital — have a lot to think about.

Expectations are high, but there is an undercurrent of skepticism. Technology has a history of producing unintended consequences. While AI has the capacity to transform work experiences for the better, it can also threaten the trust that underpins a healthy corporate culture and strong employee engagement.

Where Are We Now?

AI use is becoming widespread, including in automated logistics and warehousing systems, routine medical procedures, robotic manufacturing, chatbot technology, investment analysis, reporting and decision-making. Advances continue toward autonomous vehicles, Alexa and Siri have become like family, and music-streaming apps play our favorite new artists before we’ve ever heard of them.

Case Study


Building A Talent Pool

BY SARAH FISTER GALE

O

ur society has a problem. College has gotten so prohibitively expensive that young people are losing access to the education they need to build the skills to launch a career. At the same time companies are struggling to find talent in an almost zero-unemployment economy. But Cognizant may have found a solution. The global technology services company has partnered with Per Scholas, a nonprofit IT training program in New York City, to provide adults from underserved communities with the training they need to fill jobs in the technology industry.

“We see this as an opportunity to find new talent to fuel our rapid growth,” said Eric Westphal, Cognizant’s senior director of global corporate affairs. Since 2010, Cognizant has grown from roughly 100,000 global employees to more than 270,000 and $14.8 billion in revenues, making it one of the largest companies in the world. That has created an ongoing challenge to find talent who can meet clients’ needs.

Business Intelligence


Measurement Efforts Don’t Quite Measure Up
A disconnect between learning and tangible business outcomes as well as lagging technology may be contributing to dissatisfaction with measurement and metrics practices.

By Ashley St. John

M

easuring the impact of learning and development efforts is an important practice among L&D departments.

Learning professionals have been using Donald Kirkpatrick’s training evaluation model, or some variation of it, for 60 years, since it was first introduced in 1959. Through a variety of post-training assessments, gathering and analyzing learning outputs has become a big part of the day to day in L&D.

And yet, the majority of learning leaders report dissatisfaction in this area.

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in conclusion


Is This Thing On?

Adding emotional subtext back into virtual communications By NICK MORGAN

Headshot of Nick Morgan

Nick Morgan is a speaking coach and author. His most recent book is “Can You Hear Me? How to Connect with People in a Virtual World.” He can be reached at editor@CLOmedia.com.

W

e are all participants in a massive social experiment that began slowly in the 1970s and gathered speed in the past decade with the introduction of the smart phone. We have created a wide variety of digital means of communicating that replace older, slower face-to-face interactions.

But this has a downside. We are worrying about shorter attention spans and wondering if the internet makes us stupid. Worst of all, we are realizing how emotionally empty virtual communications can be. In transferring many of our human interactions to the virtual world, we no longer get the emotional information, support and reinforcement we used to when communicating face-to-face. In business, this leads to miscommunication, misunderstandings, and a great deal of do-overs, workarounds and relationships to repair.

Thanks for reading our March 2019 issue!