May 2018

May 2018

Sponsored Content


New technologies impacting on-demand learning

Artificial intelligence, augmented reality, voice interfaces, and other emerging technologies are helping learners at their point of need.

By Karen Hebert-Maccaro

E

merging technologies like artificial intelligence (AI), voice interfaces, and augmented reality (AR) are poised to radically change the nature of work—and learning. And in response, Learning & Development (L&D) and HR departments are changing what they do and how they do it. They have a new role to play: architects of dynamic learning ecosystems.

While the formal learning experiences at the center of most current L&D programs are as valuable as ever, L&D professionals now have a huge opportunity to bring more value to their organizations through on-demand, informal learning powered by new tech-enabled platforms and tools. With these new offerings, L&D expands its mandate and impact beyond “programs” to providing an ecosystem that enhances workers’ productivity precisely because it’s embedded in their daily routines and is right at hand when they need it.

Editor’s Letter


It’s Not All Greek to Me

I

lost my fifth grade science fair.

Given the title of my presentation — which was something like “The Art and Architecture of Ancient Greece” — this outcome may not surprise you. It certainly came as a shock to me.

It turns out my meticulous drawings illustrating the soaring columns and sculptured friezes that still support ancient Greek temples many centuries later weren’t quite what all the kids were talking about in middle school. Honestly, the judges must have thought the topic so obscure that my parents had to have put me up to it. But no, sadly, it was all my choice. I was strange that way.

As you may have suspected, my project ended somewhere in the middle of the pack. The winner was a presentation on the science of surfing by a classmate who had just returned from visiting family in California. He definitely had the cool factor I was lacking in my project, not to mention a really solid demonstration of wave science.

MAY 2018 | Volume 17, Issue 4

CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER
John R. Taggart
jrtag@CLOmedia.com

PRESIDENT
Kevin A. Simpson
ksimpson@CLOmedia.com

Vice President, GROUP PUBLISHER
Clifford Capone
ccapone@CLOmedia.com

VICE PRESIDENT, EDITOR IN CHIEF
Mike Prokopeak
mikep@CLOmedia.com

Editorial Director
Rick Bell
rbell@CLOmedia.com

Managing Editor
Ashley St. John
astjohn@CLOmedia.com

SENIOR EDITOR
Lauren Dixon
ldixon@CLOmedia.com

ASSOCIATE EDITORS
Andie Burjek
aburjek@CLOmedia.com

Ave Rio
ario@CLOmedia.com

COPY EDITOR
Christopher Magnus
cmagnus@CLOmedia.com

editorial art director
Theresa Stoodley
tstoodley@CLOmedia.com

Video and Multimedia Producer
Andrew Kennedy Lewis
alewis@CLOmedia.com

Editorial InternS
Aysha Ashley Househ
ahouseh@CLOmedia.com

Mariel Tishma
mtishma@CLOmedia.com

Vice President, RESEARCH & Advisory Services
Sarah Kimmel
skimmel@CLOmedia.com

RESEARCH MANAGER
Tim Harnett
tharnett@CLOmedia.com

Data Scientist
Grey Litaker
glitaker@CLOmedia.com

Research Content Specialist
Kristen Britt
kbritt@CLOmedia.com

Media & Production Manager
Ashley Flora
aflora@CLOmedia.com

Production Coordinator
Nina Howard
nhoward@CLOmedia.com

VICE PRESIDENT, EVENTS
Trey Smith
tsmith@CLOmedia.com

Events Content Coordinator
Malaz Elsheikh
melsheikh@CLOmedia.com

Webcast Manager
Alec O’Dell
aodell@CLOmedia.com

Events Graphic Designer
Tonya Harris
lharris@CLOmedia.com

BUSINESS MANAGER
Vince Czarnowski
vince@CLOmedia.com

Regional Sales ManagerS
Derek Graham
dgraham@CLOmedia.com

Robert Stevens
rstevens@CLOmedia.com

Daniella Weinberg
dweinberg@CLOmedia.com

Director, Business Development 
Kevin Fields
kfields@CLOmedia.com

Audience Development Director
Cindy Cardinal
ccardinal@CLOmedia.com

Digital & Audience Insights Manager
Lauren Lynch
llynch@CLOmedia.com

Digital Coordinator
Mannat Mahtani
mmahtani@CLOmedia.com

LIST MANAGER
Mike Rovello
hcmlistrentals@infogroup.com

Business Administration Manager
Melanie Lee
mlee@CLOmedia.com

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS
Bianca Baumann
Ken Blanchard
Agatha Bordonaro
Robert M. Burnside
Jayme Currans
Fred Delmhorst
Sarah Fister Gale
David Hoff
Amy W. Loomis
Elliott Masie
Lee Maxey
Bob Mosher
Jeffrey Orlando

CHIEF LEARNING OFFICER EDITORIAL ADVISORY BOARD

Cedric Coco, EVP, Chief People Officer, Brookdale Senior Living Inc.
Lisa Doyle, Head of Retail Training, Ace Hardware
David DeFilippo, Chief People and Learning Officer, Suffolk
Tamar Elkeles, Chief Talent Executive, Atlantic Bridge Capital
Thomas Evans, (Ret.) Chief Learning Officer, PricewaterhouseCoopers
Gerry Hudson-Martin, Director, Corporate Learning Strategies, Business Architects
Kimo Kippen, President, Aloha Learning Advisors
Rob Lauber, Vice President, Chief Learning Officer, McDonald’s Corp.
Maj. Gen. Erwin F. Lessel, (Ret.) U.S. Air Force, Director, Deloitte Consulting
Justin Lombardo, (Ret.) Chief Learning Officer, Baptist Health
Adri Maisonet-Morales, Vice President, Enterprise Learning and Development, Blue Cross Blue Shield of North Carolina
Alan Malinchak, CEO, Éclat Transitions LLC
Lee Maxey, CEO, MindMax
Bob Mosher, Senior Partner and Chief Learning Evangelist, APPLY Synergies
Rebecca Ray, Executive Vice President, The Conference Board
Allison Rossett, (Ret.) Professor of Educational Technology, San Diego State University
Diana Thomas, CEO and Founder, Winning Results
David Vance, Executive Director, Center for Talent Reporting
Kevin D. Wilde, Executive Leadership Fellow, Carlson School of Management, University of Minnesota
James P. Woolsey, President, Defense Aquisition University

Chief Learning Officer (ISSN 1935-8148) is published monthly, except bi-monthly in January/February and July/August by MediaTec Publishing Inc., 111 E. Wacker Dr., Suite 1200, Chicago IL 60601.  Periodicals postage paid at Chicago, IL and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Chief Learning Officer, P.O. Box 8712 Lowell, MA 01853. Subscriptions are free to qualified professionals within the US and Canada. Digital free subscriptions are available worldwide. Nonqualified paid subscriptions are available at the subscription price of $199 for 10 issues. All countries outside the US and Canada must be prepaid in US funds with an additional $33 postage surcharge. Single price copy is $29.99.

Chief Learning Officer and CLOmedia.com are the trademarks of MediaTec Publishing Inc. Copyright © 2018, MediaTec Publishing Inc. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Reproduction of material published in Chief Learning Officer is forbidden without permission.

Printed by: Quad/Graphics, Sussex, WI

ON THE COVER: PHOTO BY BRIAN FLAHERTY

24


Profile

Agatha Bordonaro
With fresh perspectives and creative ingenuity, Louise Kyhl Triolo is reinventing learning at Airbus.

52


Case Study

Sarah Fister Gale
Amazon’s Career Choice program helps hourly workers get the training they need to kick off their careers.

54


Business Intelligence

Mike Prokopeak
HR technology is making human skills like leadership, communication and collaboration more and more critical.

Features

18
Fred Delmhorst and Jeffrey Orlando
The time is right to broaden inputs into how the talent process unfolds across the organization.
36
Ave Rio
A dual focus on business strategy and employee engagement can ensure a corporate university’s guiding principles align with those of the company.
40
Bianca Baumann
Take a page from the marketing book and create a content strategy to better engage learners and drive performance.
44
Amy W. Loomis and Robert M. Burnside
The digital revolution presents challenges and opportunities to the traditional learning delivery model.
48
Jayme Currans
Transactional leadership styles offer an efficient way to communicate with today’s age-diverse workforce, but they’re not without drawbacks.

Experts

10
Elliott Masie
‘Alexa, How Did I Do Today on Sales Calls?’
12
Bob Mosher
The Road From Training to Performance
14
Ken Blanchard
Building a Culture of Legendary Service
16
Lee Maxey
Educating for a Fluid Future
58
David Hoff
Learning Agility and Its Role in Leadership

Resources

4
It’s Not All Greek to Me

Are you a part of the CLO Network?

Imperatives


‘Alexa, How Did I Do Today on Sales Calls?’

Responsive technology is making its way to the workplace By Elliott Masie

Elliott Masie is the chairman and CLO of The Masie Center’s Learning Consortium and CEO of The Masie Center, an international think tank focused on learning and workplace productivity.
He can be reached at editor@CLOmedia.com.

O

ur workplaces will soon have a range of smart speakers, responsive mobile devices and chatbots — all for providing employees with rapid answers to questions or performance support elements. Employees will be able to ask a question verbally or type a query and get an immediate response.

This “pull” level of response from speakers, cell phones, computer devices and even corporate phone systems will mirror the rising nature of smart speakers in our homes.

Are workers and employers truly ready for the next chapter of responsive technology? We must consider that these speakers and systems can:
 

  • Listen and watch an employee’s interactions, analyzing language and actions for coaching feedback.
  • Provide historical analysis of how the sales calls that land contracts differ from unsuccessful calls.
  • Monitor performance data from corporate systems and provide real-time feedback as work results change.
  • Insert short teaching or coaching moments into the day focused on a behavior or outcome pattern.

selling up, selling down


The Road From Training to Performance

Is the destination in sight? By Bob Mosher

Bob Mosher is a senior partner and chief learning evangelist for APPLY Synergies, a strategic consulting firm.
He can be reached at editor@CLOmedia.com.

T

wo years ago I wrote an article on the emergence of a fundamental shift from a training mindset to a performance mindset. With the advent of 70-20-10 and other related methodologies, the discussion around design for workflow-embedded learning has heated up considerably.

A yearlong benchmarking study was recently concluded with eight major corporations at varying stages of this journey, and the results are interesting.

It began by identifying an implementation spectrum to show the degree to which these organizations had successfully embedded learning and support deliverables in their workflow. The spectrum had five levels:

Level 1. Haphazard, scattered learning and support: Performance deliverables consist of add-on job aids, out-of-the-box software help and other basic performance support means and methods. Performance assets are created spontaneously, as needs arise, with no methodology, planning or strategy behind it.

leadership


Building a Culture of Legendary Service

A company’s culture of service is what keeps customers coming back By ken blanchard

Ken Blanchard is chief spiritual officer of The Ken Blanchard Cos. and co-author of “Collaboration Begins with You: Be a Silo Buster.”
He can be reached at editor@CLOmedia.com.

T

hink about the last time you received great customer service — not just good, but actually memorable. Service you would tell your friends and family about.

If you’re having a hard time coming up with anything, join the club. Every organization knows that great customer service is key to a successful operation, yet few have a proven plan to build a service-minded culture. In fact, people in front-line, customer-facing jobs often don’t receive any customer service training other than platitudes such as “keep smiling” and “say thank you” — and many don’t even get that.

When an organization fails to address the need to provide outstanding service, in time a vicious spiral begins. Clients begin to leave. The company finds itself having to constantly generate new business because customers aren’t happy, and the work gets harder. Revenue dips along with morale. When people don’t feel valued, some employees leave to find a better company where they can make a difference. Even worse, some stay and take their frustrations out on the customers. This toxic environment continues to erode the organization’s customer base and its bottom line.

Making the grade


Educating for a Fluid Future

While the nature of work is changing, educational preparation lags behind By Lee maxey

Lee Maxey is CEO of MindMax, a marketing and enrollment management services company.
He can be reached at editor@CLOmedia.com.

M

anagement guru Peter Drucker allegedly said, “Culture eats strategy for breakfast.” For example, in mergers, cultural mismatch can ultimately break a business bond. Think Daimler and Chrysler. Or how about this blast from the past: In 1986, WordPerfect was America’s best-selling word processing software. However, after being purchased by software and services company Novell in 1994, top managers at Novell and WordPerfect ruined the marriage with strategy disagreements.

Companies with a winning culture like Wegmans have employees (whether newly hired or long tenured) who embrace the mission and work ethic. Ask a Wegmans employee for help, and they’ll get you what you need or connect you with someone who can. The New England Patriots are another example of the power of culture. In the past 15 years, Patriots owner Bob Kraft, coach Bill Belichick and quarterback Tom Brady have led their team to eight Super Bowls. The Patriots’ culture creates a sense of ownership among all constituents and turns athletes — some considered washed up, below par or difficult — into prolific contributors.

The time is right to broaden inputs into how the talent process unfolds across the organization.

By Fred Delmhorst and Jeffrey Orlando

Periodic talent reviews are a core component of leadership succession planning in most mature organizations and a critical role for any human resources function. While rigorous talent assessment tools are available, they can be time consuming to deploy. As such, only a small percentage of available talent in an organization, as little as the top 1 percent or less, typically is considered.

Once the talent review process is complete, high-potential development planning is similarly resource-constrained. Therefore, both the assessment and development phases can be difficult to scale. These simple facts require any talent management function to be extremely judicious in how they allocate their time, even when cultivating their very top talent.

While traditional, top-down talent management processes will always have a place, something of a democratization of talent development resources is emerging. First, there are many free or low-cost content providers such as Khan Academy and Coursera. Second, there are new learning platforms, such as Degreed and Pathgather, which create a social learning environment that takes some of the heavy lifting out of HR’s hands.

The time is right to broaden inputs into how the talent process unfolds across the organization.

By Fred Delmhorst and Jeffrey Orlando

Periodic talent reviews are a core component of leadership succession planning in most mature organizations and a critical role for any human resources function. While rigorous talent assessment tools are available, they can be time consuming to deploy. As such, only a small percentage of available talent in an organization, as little as the top 1 percent or less, typically is considered.

Once the talent review process is complete, high-potential development planning is similarly resource-constrained. Therefore, both the assessment and development phases can be difficult to scale. These simple facts require any talent management function to be extremely judicious in how they allocate their time, even when cultivating their very top talent.

While traditional, top-down talent management processes will always have a place, something of a democratization of talent development resources is emerging. First, there are many free or low-cost content providers such as Khan Academy and Coursera. Second, there are new learning platforms, such as Degreed and Pathgather, which create a social learning environment that takes some of the heavy lifting out of HR’s hands.

Periodic talent reviews are a core component of leadership succession planning in most mature organizations and a critical role for any human resources function. While rigorous talent assessment tools are available, they can be time consuming to deploy. As such, only a small percentage of available talent in an organization, as little as the top 1 percent or less, typically is considered.

Once the talent review process is complete, high-potential development planning is similarly resource-constrained. Therefore, both the assessment and development phases can be difficult to scale. These simple facts require any talent management function to be extremely judicious in how they allocate their time, even when cultivating their very top talent.

While traditional, top-down talent management processes will always have a place, something of a democratization of talent development resources is emerging. First, there are many free or low-cost content providers such as Khan Academy and Coursera. Second, there are new learning platforms, such as Degreed and Pathgather, which create a social learning environment that takes some of the heavy lifting out of HR’s hands.

Together these resources provide an opportunity for more of a bottom-up approach to talent development, which can reach a much broader cross-section of employees at scale.

We challenge the traditional notion that there is only one succession pool and propose that companies would be wise to consider how to foster multiple succession pools driven from both the top and the bottom of the organization. While some pools may remain actively managed, others may be activated by more passive support of the talent and learning functions.

In addition, it is important to evaluate the typical inputs or qualifications for inclusion in a talent pool and whether they, too, should be broadened as learning and development moves from a digital to an intelligent age.

Profile


Learning to Innovate

With fresh perspectives and creative ingenuity, Louise Kyhl Triolo is reinventing learning at Airbus.

BY AGATHA BORDONARO

PHOTOS BY BRIAN FLAHERTY

In 2000, Louise Kyhl Triolo was a fresh-faced, newly minted master’s program graduate in Copenhagen, helping fellow Danish citizens find jobs through her role as an outplacement consultant, when she made the decision to move to Paris.

“I wanted to know what it was like to work in a business, and I wanted to do that in Paris because I loved France and knew how to speak French,” she said. So the enterprising then-25-year-old moved, giving herself three months to find employment in the City of Lights. On the final day of her sojourn, she landed an interview — and ultimately a job — with L’Oréal.

Over the next 15 years, two more bold moves followed, first to the south of France for a position with Airbus Helicopter and then, two years ago, to Silicon Valley to head up leadership development, culture innovation and the North American Leadership University for Airbus, joining a newly created team of three in a small office in Mountain View, California. Kyhl Triolo got the job by writing a white paper explaining why the new team would need someone like her.

Design Effective, Data-Driven Blended Campaigns

By Cornerstone

Follow the Learners

What is the value of rethinking the traditional split of classroom and digital learning? Lori Niles-Hofmann, director of digital learning for Scotiabank, believes that to be effective with modern audiences, learning campaigns must strategically and appropriately blend methodologies, leveraging the full spectrum of tools to meet learners on their own terms and using data and metrics to continually monitor the results, discover insights and improve.

Embracing Digital

Using HR tech to better develop and grow talent, both in the public and private sector

By John Bersentes

Organizations and agencies alike are moving toward the adoption of more unified talent management solutions. However, such solutions take time to implement. The end game of a cloud-based full candidate lifecycle talent management solution can take as much as a year or two to deploy. The goal of such a solution is to help establish performance-based outcomes with great efficiency and cost effectiveness.

Working in response to the Office of Management & Budget OMD Directive 17-22 (and on the cusp of the passage of the IT Modernization Act) will provide an unprecedented opportunity to respond to recent trends across the commercial sector. Such trends have accompanied an infusion of capital and a multitude of new players. While working to foster a new spirit of innovation, talent management and career development executives must contend with limited resources, talent shortages and a fragmented and competitive marketplace while still developing and growing talent. Changes caused by the disruption of HR tech will undoubtedly move the needle on public sector hiring reform efforts as we are beginning to see the adoption of more data-centric and analytical tools and approaches.

Artificial Intelligence vs. Human Intelligence

Balancing STEM degrees with liberal arts education

By Adina Sapp

For many years, STEM skills have been in high demand to support the increasingly digital and technological workplace, and the number of students graduating with humanities degrees has begun to drop. Now professionals must compete with artificial intelligence (AI) as well. Estimates vary, but some experts anticipate that about 5 percent of jobs could be eliminated due to automation (which includes AI) and that up to 45 percent of tasks across all occupations could be automated. The big concern is how this will affect workers.

Melissa Goldberg, director of workforce insights for Southern New Hampshire University (SNHU), suggests that as routine tasks become increasingly automated, the types of soft skills supported by a liberal arts degree will take on a new importance. STEM skills will remain relevant, but HR professionals will see increased emphasis on creativity, customer interaction and emotional intelligence.

Content Sponsored By GP Strategies

Learning in Practice Award Spotlight

Mastercard Motivates New Hires With Sleek Digital Learning Model

Mastercard’s learning team rolled out a streamlined, interactive onboarding program that quickly immerses new employees in the mission of the firm and creates a sense of belonging.

THE CHALLENGE

From the minute a new hire steps through the front door, they’re forming an impression of their new employer. Too often, they’re simply handed a binder full of documents to read alone in a barren cubicle, put through a meeting or two and are then expected to hit the ground running without an understanding of their place in the organization.

According to employee recognition company O.C. Tanner, 60 percent of organizations fail to set concrete goals or milestones for new hires. In a separate analysis, Harvard Business Review found that almost a quarter of organizations have no onboarding process at all. How an organization presents itself to new hires in the critical first few weeks on the job can spell the difference between an engaged, loyal worker and one that walks back out that door in six months. A lack of onboarding processes can cost an organization time and money through lower productivity and morale.

he first corporate universities were created more than 60 years ago as a place for employees to learn in conjunction with the company’s vision and business goals. General Electric’s Crotonville started in the mid-1950s, McDonald’s Hamburger University opened its doors in 1961, and Disney University and Motorola University debuted in the ’70s. They became more widespread and prominent in the ’80s and ’90s and quickly became the “places to go” to learn in the business world. But technology’s pace of change and the emergence of digital learning aggregators have brought the effectiveness of the traditional corporate university model into question.

Daniel Gandarilla, vice president and CLO at Texas Health Resources University, said the corporate university is not dead — it’s being redefined. In his research on the subject, Gandarilla found roughly 10 different viable definitions for the corporate university that are continuing to evolve. This one by Kevin Wheeler and Eileen Clegg from 2005 exemplifies how the definition is evolving: “A true corporate university has moved beyond training and education and into the daily challenge of getting results. It provides leadership in supporting people and processes to achieve bottom-line success for the organization.”

he first corporate universities were created more than 60 years ago as a place for employees to learn in conjunction with the company’s vision and business goals. General Electric’s Crotonville started in the mid-1950s, McDonald’s Hamburger University opened its doors in 1961, and Disney University and Motorola University debuted in the ’70s. They became more widespread and prominent in the ’80s and ’90s and quickly became the “places to go” to learn in the business world. But technology’s pace of change and the emergence of digital learning aggregators have brought the effectiveness of the traditional corporate university model into question.

Daniel Gandarilla, vice president and CLO at Texas Health Resources University, said the corporate university is not dead — it’s being redefined. In his research on the subject, Gandarilla found roughly 10 different viable definitions for the corporate university that are continuing to evolve. This one by Kevin Wheeler and Eileen Clegg from 2005 exemplifies how the definition is evolving: “A true corporate university has moved beyond training and education and into the daily challenge of getting results. It provides leadership in supporting people and processes to achieve bottom-line success for the organization.”

By Bianca Baumann

arketers are proficient in using a content engagement cycle, a practice for deciding when to engage whom with what kind of content during the customer journey. They plan months, quarters and even years in advance to create a content strategy that aligns with business goals and engages their audience pre and post-sale.

L&D professionals on the other hand often think about each training session or learning program singularly instead of looking at the overall learner experience. Mapping out the learner life cycle and assigning content that engages them along the way not only helps create unforgettable learning experiences but also aids in the transfer of knowledge after a training session ends. Let’s take a page out of marketing’s playbook and treat content as a business asset in order to create engaging and thought-provoking content, plan well in advance and drive performance.

According to Kristina Halvorson, CEO and founder of content strategy agency Brain Traffic, content strategy is the “creation, publication and governance of useful, usable content.” It looks at content, which can be text, images or multimedia, as a business asset. Ultimately, having a content strategy helps create meaningful, engaging and sustainable content and allows you to identify the right content at the right time for the right audience.

In addition to determining what content exists, what content should be created and, more important, why it should be created, putting measurements in place allows you to see what content is in high demand and sheds light on how content is being accessed.

By Bianca Baumann

arketers are proficient in using a content engagement cycle, a practice for deciding when to engage whom with what kind of content during the customer journey. They plan months, quarters and even years in advance to create a content strategy that aligns with business goals and engages their audience pre and post-sale.

L&D professionals on the other hand often think about each training session or learning program singularly instead of looking at the overall learner experience. Mapping out the learner life cycle and assigning content that engages them along the way not only helps create unforgettable learning experiences but also aids in the transfer of knowledge after a training session ends. Let’s take a page out of marketing’s playbook and treat content as a business asset in order to create engaging and thought-provoking content, plan well in advance and drive performance.

According to Kristina Halvorson, CEO and founder of content strategy agency Brain Traffic, content strategy is the “creation, publication and governance of useful, usable content.” It looks at content, which can be text, images or multimedia, as a business asset. Ultimately, having a content strategy helps create meaningful, engaging and sustainable content and allows you to identify the right content at the right time for the right audience.

In addition to determining what content exists, what content should be created and, more important, why it should be created, putting measurements in place allows you to see what content is in high demand and sheds light on how content is being accessed.

Advertising:
For advertising information, write to sales@CLOmedia.com.


Back Issues:
For all requests, including bulk issue orders, please visit our website at CLOmedia.com/products or email hcmalerts@e-circ.net.


Editorial:
To submit an article for publication, go to CLOmedia.com/submission-guidelines. Letters to the editor may be sent to editor@CLOmedia.com.


Permissions and Article Reprints:
No part of Chief Learning Officer can be reproduced without written permission. All permissions to republish or distribute content from Chief Learning Officer can be obtained through PARS International. For single article reprints in quantities of 250 and above and e-prints for Web posting, please contact PARS International at MediaTecReprints@parsintl.com.


List Rental:
Contact Mike Rovello at 402-836-5639 or hcmlistrentals@infogroup.com.


Subscription Services:

All orders, inquiries and address changes should be addressed to

Computer Fulfillment
PO Box 8712
Lowell, MA 01853

or call customer service at 800-422-2681 or 978-671-0446 or email hcmalerts@e-circ.net.

Advertising Sales

Clifford Capone
Vice President,
Group Publisher

312-967-3538
ccapone@CLOmedia.com


Derek Graham
Regional Sales Manager
312-967-3591
dgraham@CLOmedia.com
AL, AR, DE, FL, GA, IA, IL, IN, KS, KY, LA, MD, MI, MN, MO, MS, NC, ND, NE, OH, OK, SC, SD, TN, TX, VA, WI, WV, District of Columbia, Ontario, Manitoba, Saskatchewan Newfoundland, Europe


Robert Stevens
Regional Sales Manager
312-967-0751
rstevens@CLOmedia.com
AZ, CA, CO, HI, ID, MT, NM, NV, OR, UT, WA, WY, British Columbia and Alberta


Daniella Weinberg
Regional Sales Manager
917-627-1125
dweinberg@CLOmedia.com
CT, MA, MD, ME, NH, NJ, NY, PA, RI, VT, Quebec, New Brunswick, Newfoundland, Europe


Kevin M. Fields
Director, Business Development 
312-967-3565
kfields@CLOmedia.com


Melanie Lee
Business Administration Manager
510-834-0100, ext. 231
mlee@CLOmedia.com

The digital revolution presents challenges and opportunities to the traditional learning delivery model.

By Amy W. Loomis and
Robert M. Burnside

In the university model that emerged in Europe in the 11th and 12th centuries, the professor faced the class and expounded wisdom. The class debated it. The professor summarized it. Done. Knowledge formed and agreed to by the community.

In the 21st century, nothing and everything has changed about the classroom learning experience.

Look around at the explosion of digital, mobile, cloud and AI technologies and it’s easy to think we have entered a completely new era of learning. And yet much of the behavioral mechanics remain the same. Is virtual learning different from face-to-face learning? Can digital learning at scale accomplish the same depth of learning that a classroom can provide?

The digital revolution presents challenges and opportunities to the traditional learning delivery model.

By Amy W. Loomis and
Robert M. Burnside

In the university model that emerged in Europe in the 11th and 12th centuries, the professor faced the class and expounded wisdom. The class debated it. The professor summarized it. Done. Knowledge formed and agreed to by the community.

In the 21st century, nothing and everything has changed about the classroom learning experience.

Look around at the explosion of digital, mobile, cloud and AI technologies and it’s easy to think we have entered a completely new era of learning. And yet much of the behavioral mechanics remain the same. Is virtual learning different from face-to-face learning? Can digital learning at scale accomplish the same depth of learning that a classroom can provide?

Transactional leadership styles offer an efficient way to communicate with today’s age-diverse workforce, but they’re not without drawbacks.

By Jayme Currans

In today’s workplace, miscommunication is more likely than ever before.

This is due in part to the proliferation of communication tools, technologies and ever-evolving ways to communicate in increasingly rapid ways. But it’s also due to the different values and life experiences that shape the different generations at work.

With the various generations come differing communication styles and knowledge gained throughout lifetimes of experience. Each generation has a preferred way it likes to be led and by using these preferred leadership styles managers are better able to build trust and communicate with employees in the best possible way to boost understanding, motivation and results.

Transactional leadership styles offer an efficient way to communicate with today’s age-diverse workforce, but they’re not without drawbacks.

By Jayme Currans

In today’s workplace, miscommunication is more likely than ever before.

This is due in part to the proliferation of communication tools, technologies and ever-evolving ways to communicate in increasingly rapid ways. But it’s also due to the different values and life experiences that shape the different generations at work.

With the various generations come differing communication styles and knowledge gained throughout lifetimes of experience. Each generation has a preferred way it likes to be led and by using these preferred leadership styles managers are better able to build trust and communicate with employees in the best possible way to boost understanding, motivation and results.

Case Study


From Hourly to Anywhere

BY SARAH FISTER GALE

T

uition reimbursement programs are nothing new. Companies have been providing employees with financial support to pursue advanced training and expand their company-relevant skills for decades.

But Amazon, the e-commerce giant that generated $178 billion in revenue last year according to MarketWatch, does it differently. “Most tuition assistance programs target white collar workers and junior managers in pursuit of MBAs,” said Juan Garcia, director of associate career development and head of Amazon’s Career Choice program. “Our program is more peculiar.”

Career Choice is a tuition assistance program launched in 2012 that specifically targets Amazon’s hourly workers. Through the program, Amazon pre-pays 95 percent of the cost of tuition for any employee to pursue courses in any in-demand field — even if that training has zero relevance to the company. Employees, including those who work part time, are eligible to participate after one year of employment, and Amazon will spend up to $3,000 per year for up to four years to help them launch their careers.

Business Intelligence


The Digital Future Is Human

HR technology is making human skills like leadership, communication and collaboration more critical.

By Mike Prokopeak

T

he robots are coming! The robots are coming!
But as automation takes on the burden of tasks and entire jobs once carried out by people, it is putting more emphasis on the skills and abilities that remain, for the time being, the exclusive realm of humans.

The ability to think critically, adapt to change and communicate effectively in a variety of situations are the currency of the new economy. According to a survey of 4,000 professionals conducted by LinkedIn Learning, the most important skills employees will need — and that learning organizations must develop — are leadership, communication and collaboration.

This emphasis on the soft skills at the heart of modern management is increasingly driven by the digital technology transforming many industries. Nearly three-quarters of executives surveyed by The Hackett Group, a consulting firm headquartered in Miami, expect digital transformation to disrupt their industry and change the competitive landscape (Figure 1). Eight in 10 expect it to fundamentally change how they operate.

in conclusion


Learning Agility and Its Role in Leadership

Learning agility can be a leadership game changer By David Hoff

David Hoff is chief operating officer and executive vice president of leadership development at EASI Consult. He is co-author of “Learning Agility: The Key to Leader Potential.”
He can be reached at editor@CLOmedia.com.

O

ne of the great mysteries of leadership development programs, succession planning initiatives and high-potential efforts is how effective they are at capturing the results of past efforts and predicting the capability to master as-yet-unknown challenges.

Those of us who have spent our careers in talent management have long been in search of the “silver bullet” or “secret sauce.” Competencies were thought to demonstrate what great looks like, but the problem is they are retrospective, not prospective.

Learning agility, which focuses on the ability to perform in the future, provides an answer. Warner Burke, professor of psychology at Columbia University, has studied learning agility for six years and describes it as being in an unfamiliar situation, not knowing what to do and figuring it out.

D. Scott DeRue, dean at the University of Michigan’s Ross School of Business, summarizes learning agility as involving two elements — speed and flexibility. Speed is the ability to act quickly, discarding ideas that don’t work to accelerate other possibilities. Flexibility is being open to new ideas and proposing new solutions.

Thanks for reading our May 2018 issue!