Chief Learning Officer
May 2019
Chief Learning Officer
May 2019

Editor’s Letter


More Than Words
Mike Prokopeak Editor in Chief
W

e have a strange way of talking about people in the workplace.

I don’t mean what we say about them or how, no matter the situation, someone somewhere is always talking about another person behind their back. To gossip is to be human, after all.

What I mean in this case are the actual words we use to describe people.

Here’s an example. At work, they’re often not individual people with their own experiences and motivations, tragedies and triumphs. They are human resources, as if they’ve been recently extracted from the ground and are ready to be turned into shiny new products.

Their individual skills, abilities, energy and efforts are the collective human capital that organizations invest in projects and priorities. If that investment isn’t delivering a return, it gets shut down. You don’t want to throw good money after bad, after all.

MAY 2019 | Volume 18, Issue 4

Free,
Live,
Online.
Chief Learning Officer is pleased to offer live and on‑demand webinars!
UPCOMING!
APR 24
Open-Source Learning: What you Need to Know
APR 25
Empowering Women in Leadership: How to Develop Female Talent
PREVIOUSLY AIRED!
APR 9
Development of Frontline Leaders: A Stealth Approach
APR 10
How to Create a Culture of Engagement
Check out more previously aired webinars at CLOmedia.com/on-demand/
Available live on the air date and on demand for one year after unless otherwise specified.
Check them out today and keep the education going!
Free,
Live,
Online.
Chief Learning Officer is pleased to offer live and on‑demand webinars!
UPCOMING!
APR 24
Open-Source Learning: What you Need to Know
APR 25
Empowering Women in Leadership: How to Develop Female Talent
PREVIOUSLY AIRED!
APR 9
Development of Frontline Leaders: A Stealth Approach
APR 10
How to Create a Culture of Engagement
Check out more previously aired webinars at CLOmedia.com/on-demand/
Available live on the air date and on demand for one year after unless otherwise specified.
Check them out today and keep the education going!
CLO Contents May 2019
Profile Cameron Hedrick
Profile Cameron Hedrick
on the cover: Photo by David Lubarsky

10


ISTE’s Joseph South shares his career journey; Detroit’s Iris Ware rethinks the role of CLO; and people share what they’re reading these days.
30


Profile

Sarah Fister Gale
How former musician Cameron Hedrick became Citi’s new future-focused CLO.

48


Case Study

Sarah Fister Gale
Hyundai is using a sales competition to capture and share best practices with dealerships across the globe.

50


Business Intelligence

Ashley St. John
Social learning buy-in may require rethinking what is being measured to assess impact.

CLO Contents May 2019
Dive In
Fewer Mentors, Bigger Problems
Healthy Learning
Transcend Gender

Features

22
Ave Rio
An unintentional outcome of the #MeToo movement is a greater hesitancy among men to mentor women.
34
John Gillis Jr.
When it comes to retention, the results of experiential learning speak for themselves.
40
Nicole Bunselmeyer
The push to digital learning has come slowly in health care, but one organization is shifting its L&D model.
44
Rick Koonce and Carol Vallone Mitchell
Successful women leaders share a set of traits that all leaders, regardless of gender, should strive for.

Experts

14
Michael E. Echols
Learning Mission Launch
16
Bob Mosher
The Selling and Marketing of L&D
18
Ken Blanchard
Effective Leadership Is Transformational
20
Lee Maxey
The Economic Virtue of Teaching Diversity
54
David Blake
The Workplace Self-Training Paradigm

Resources

Your Career


Your Career


Career Advice From

Joseph South

CHIEF LEARNING OFFICER, INTERNATIONAL SOCIETY FOR TECHNOLOGY IN EDUCATION

Joseph South, chief learning officer for the International Society for Technology in Education, shares his career journey and what he has learned along the way.
Career Advice from Kathleen Gallo
Joseph South

How did you start your career in learning?

I entered the field of instructional design by designing one of the first online courses on the internet. I was working at a nonprofit foundation and the director asked if anyone was interested in designing a course for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. That was a pivotal moment for me because I got to create a learning experience in a new medium — and that really hooked me. The thrill of innovating in a way that scales the impact has never left me from that moment. After that, I worked at the Center for Instructional Design at Brigham Young University. And I also developed adaptive language learning solutions for both K12 and adults. That was another moment where I had the excitement of innovation, but I also learned that it’s not enough to give someone the right tools if they don’t have the right infrastructure and the right mindset to embrace new approaches to learning.

Small Bites - Joseph South answers our rapid-fire questions
The most important part of learning is:
Empowering the learner. They should be in the driver’s seat and we should be their GPS.
The most important part of learning
The most overrated trend in L&D is:
Immersive technology. Yes, there are places where it’s exactly the right solution, but there are many more when it’s just an expensive distraction.
Your Career


Your Career


What Are You Reading?
The Culture Code by Daniel Coyle
The Culture Code
By Daniel Coyle
Culture is not something you are — it’s something you do. “The Culture Code” puts the power in your hands. No matter the size of your group or your goal, this book can teach you the principles of cultural chemistry that transform individuals into teams that can accomplish amazing things together. Coyle goes inside some of the world’s most successful organizations — including the U.S. Navy’s SEAL Team Six, IDEO and the NBA’s San Antonio Spurs — and reveals what makes them tick. He demystifies the culture-building process by identifying three key skills that generate cohesion and cooperation and explains how diverse groups learn to function with a single mind.
Pushparaj Susairaj
Pushparaj Susairaj, training consultant, Afilias Corp.
Your Career


Your Career


Top of Mind
Learning Without Boundaries: Rethinking the Role of CLO By Iris Ware
Iris Ware, chief learning officer for the city of Detroit, says it is time to rethink the boundaries of the CLO role.

The role of the chief learning officer is changing. Since its noted inception in the 1990s, the role of the CLO has focused on leading and formulating the learning strategy, learning management, and employee training and development within an organization. As the highest-ranking corporate officer responsible for learning management, the primary focus of our work is directed toward internal employee training and development. Our boundaries have centered on driving change and improving organizational performance within the confines of the organization. As we approach more than 30 years of service, maybe it’s time to rethink our role.

Iris Ware - City of Detroit
Iris Ware - City of Detroit

BUSINESS IMPACT


Learning Mission Launch
Challenges for learning are among the greatest in the executive suite By Michael E. Echols
Michael E. Echols is principal and founder of Human Capital LLC

Michael E. Echols is principal and founder of Human Capital LLC and author of “Your Future Is Calling.”
He can be reached at editor@CLOmedia.com.

T

here is an immense array of challenges facing corporate leaders today. Learning is certainly one of them. Two fundamental drivers are creating change at an accelerating rate and, in turn, establishing an ever-more uncertain future requiring new skills. Learning is at the forefront.

The first driver is the shift from physical and local to digital and global. Coding has become a buzzword in skills development discussions. Coding is where the “rubber meets the road” in the stampede to digital and global. Programmers are the construction workers of the rapidly expanding digital assets taking place all over the world. We need many more builders. But under the coding frenzy are shifts in all manner of traditional corporate functions. Marketing is one example.

selling up, selling down


The Selling and Marketing of L&D
In most cases, the product sells itself BY BOB MOSHER
Chief Learning Officer author, Bob Mosher headshot.
Bob Mosher is a senior partner and chief learning evangelist for APPLY Synergies, a strategic consulting firm. He can be reached at editor@CLOmedia.com.
I

recently visited a colleague who is a senior learning leader for a Fortune 100 company. He is a visionary leader, a remarkable student of our trade and as technically competent as they come.

He has a clear and well-vetted vision of where L&D can go and what it can do for his organization and has done his homework around budgeting and resourcing to help act on this vision. His ideas are forward thinking, performance-based and well beyond what I see in a typical L&D portfolio.

Yet he was frustrated with the managers of the lines of business he was tasked with supporting. His frustration was with their narrow focus specifically around “their infatuation with the classroom” and “little to no interest in learning to start with.”

LEADERSHIP


Effective Leadership Is Transformational
It all starts from within BY KEN BLANCHARD
Chief Learning Officer author, Ken Blanchard's headshot.
Ken Blanchard is chief spiritual officer of The Ken Blanchard Cos. and co-author of “Servant Leadership in Action.” He can be reached at editor@CLOmedia.com.
E

ffective leadership is a transformational journey made up of four “spheres of influence.” These are self leadership, one-on-one leadership, team leadership and organizational leadership.

Picture a target with three concentric circles around a bull’s-eye. The bull’s-eye in the middle — self leadership — is the heart of the four spheres. It comes first because effective leadership starts on the inside.

Most of us have heard flight attendants say that in an emergency you should secure your own oxygen mask before helping others. In a similar vein, before you can hope to lead anyone else, you first must know yourself and what you need to be successful.

Making the grade


The Economic Virtue of Teaching Diversity

You don’t have to travel the world to learn diversity’s value BY LEE MAXEY

Lee Maxey, CEO of MindMax

Lee Maxey is CEO of MindMax, a marketing and enrollment management services company.
He can be reached at editor@CLOmedia.com.

A

fter traveling the United States in the early 1800s, French political scientist Alexis de Tocqueville noted, among other things, that cooperation and association are not easy virtues to learn, but embracing both makes possible freedom and democracy. If today Tocqueville toured an American university or corporation with a diversity and inclusion program, I believe he would see freedom and democracy at work.

U.S. companies and institutions of higher education that embrace diversity lead our nation away from the divisions that sometimes parade as patriotism. The definition of diversity isn’t as clear to some people as others, though. I recently visited a New England college with my daughter. When leaving the campus, she said, “I saw a lot of Black Lives Matter posters, but I didn’t see a person of color the whole time we were there.”

Fewer Mentors, Bigger Problems
An unintentional outcome of the #MeToo movement is a greater hesitancy among men to mentor women. This could have dramatic negative effects for women and companies — but learning leaders can help.
By Ave Rio
Fewer Mentors, Bigger Problems
A 2018 survey from the LeanIn Foundation and SurveyMonkey found that nearly half of male managers felt uncomfortable participating in a common work activity with a woman, such as mentoring, working alone or socializing together.

Specifically, the number of male managers who felt uncomfortable mentoring women went from 5 percent to 16 percent in late 2017 after the #MeToo movement went viral. That means about 1 in 6 male managers would hesitate to mentor a woman.

This hesitation and fear pose problems for women and for the success of companies. Organizations that fail to properly address this unintentional backlash of the #MeToo movement may be in trouble. Learning leaders can help to create an inclusive environment where employees feel safe to talk about the complexities of the #MeToo movement and any concerns stemming from it.

Self-Imposed Fear
Amri Johnson, former global head of diversity and inclusion at Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research, said people are grappling with the notion of mentoring and meritocracy and questioning whether they are comfortable being a sponsor. “They were grappling with that before the whole #MeToo movement came to a head as it has in the past year or so,” he said. “At this point, men who had a certain amount of hesitance around mentorship or sponsorship — it’s probably reinforced it.”
Fewer Mentors, Bigger Problems
An unintentional outcome of the #MeToo movement is a greater hesitancy among men to mentor women. This could have dramatic negative effects for women and companies — but learning leaders can help.
By Ave Rio
A 2018 survey from the LeanIn Foundation and SurveyMonkey found that nearly half of male managers felt uncomfortable participating in a common work activity with a woman, such as mentoring, working alone or socializing together.

Specifically, the number of male managers who felt uncomfortable mentoring women went from 5 percent to 16 percent in late 2017 after the #MeToo movement went viral. That means about 1 in 6 male managers would hesitate to mentor a woman.

This hesitation and fear pose problems for women and for the success of companies. Organizations that fail to properly address this unintentional backlash of the #MeToo movement may be in trouble. Learning leaders can help to create an inclusive environment where employees feel safe to talk about the complexities of the #MeToo movement and any concerns stemming from it.

Self-Imposed Fear
Amri Johnson, former global head of diversity and inclusion at Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research, said people are grappling with the notion of mentoring and meritocracy and questioning whether they are comfortable being a sponsor. “They were grappling with that before the whole #MeToo movement came to a head as it has in the past year or so,” he said. “At this point, men who had a certain amount of hesitance around mentorship or sponsorship — it’s probably reinforced it.”
Raytheon Improves Compliance With U.S. Export/Import Regulations And Boosts Global Sales With Comprehensive Learning Solution

CONTENT SPONSORED BY RAYTHEON PROFESSIONAL SERVICES

LEARNING IN PRACTICE AWARD SPOTLIGHT

RAYTHEON IMPROVES COMPLIANCE WITH U.S. EXPORT/IMPORT REGULATIONS AND BOOSTS GLOBAL SALES WITH COMPREHENSIVE LEARNING SOLUTION

Raytheon Co.’s Global Trade organization partnered with Raytheon Professional Services to design, implement and operate an enterprise-wide learning program, leading to a reduction in violations of U.S. export/import (EX/IM) regulations by over 90 percent, and enabling further international business growth.

By Agatha Bordonaro

THE CHALLENGE:

To ensure compliance with all U.S. regulations pertaining to the export and import of defense products and grow its international sales, Raytheon needed to develop a rigorous learning program, training three employee groups with distinctly different needs.

The U.S. government carefully regulates the export and import of defense products. All sales of these items to international customers require U.S. government approval. The U.S. State Department places conditions on each sale to ensure these assets do not fall into the wrong hands. The U.S. government can also prohibit a company from selling its defense products internationally if its violations are particularly egregious. So, for Raytheon, EX/IM compliance is of paramount importance, not only for achieving the company’s mission and protecting its reputation, but also for improving its bottom line.

Sponsored Content
Sponsored Content
Closing the skills gap in early career professionals
How employee communication, expressiveness and self-knowing contribute to business goals.
By: Tim Harnett
According to the latest LinkedIn global trends report, a rising focus on soft skills is one of the biggest trends affecting the workplace.1 At the same time, there’s a gap between the skills employers need and those employees have.2 How to reconcile this? Drew Jacobs, director of learning for Ariel, advocates for a holistic approach to development through presence training — essentially, developing the ability to connect authentically with the hearts and minds of others. Presence encapsulates how you show up and the impression that you leave, and can be developed through a prescribed model.

Developing presence helps people express and share their ideas in an impactful way. Jacobs believes it’s crucial to start building this skill at the beginning of your career. “Individuals need to show up in a genuine way and communicate from an authentic place to understand what they stand for,” she says. “Ideally, this should be nurtured early in an employee’s career, to avoid creating bad habits that will hinder success later.”

Profile


Learning to Play by Ear
How former jazz musician Cameron Hedrick is playing a new tune as Citi’s future-focused CLO.
By Sarah Fister Gale
CLO Trish ‘Doc’ Holliday
Citi CLO Cameron Hedrick didn’t always dream of becoming a corporate executive. Hedrick began his career as a music composition major at Ouachita Baptist University in Arkansas. While studying, he joined a jazz combo and spent two years after graduation playing gigs across the country.

It was the early 1990s and his combo stayed busy, in large part due to their manager who was a successful municipal bond trader who also happened to be a jazz enthusiast. “He just loved jazz, and he took care of us,” said Hedrick. “Before gigs he used to teach us about money management and bonds.”

It was a fun life, but Hedrick eventually realized that he needed a more stable job, so his manager recommended him to a colleague at Fidelity Investments. “I spoke with a very senior fund manager at Fidelity,” Hedrick said. “I didn’t have the skills for any of the roles in his department, but he connected me with another colleague who took a chance on me.”

When it comes to retention,
experiential learning speaks for itself.

By John Gillis Jr.
According to The Conference Board’s “The Business Value of Leadership Development” report, “One of the most influential internal engines to drive change is a leadership development program that sets out to nurture management talent that is entrepreneurial, enterprisewide and globally recruited.”

Many agree with this sentiment and believe that for a company to seize competitive advantage for sustainability, it must invest in high-touch, face-to-face leadership development that is aligned with corporate strategy.

Unfortunately, most current leadership development efforts are falling short when it comes to the “high-touch” aspect.

Impact Shortfall
McKinsey & Co. estimated that leadership strength explained 80 percent of its sustainable performance. The Center for Creative Leadership reported that if done correctly, leadership development creates competitive advantage by driving strategy execution, navigating change, improving financial performance and retaining talent. Because of this noted impact, Deloitte previously reported that 85 percent of human resources leaders rate leadership pipeline as the top priority of companies. Willis Towers Watson and Development Dimensions International have published similar reports.
Dive In
When it comes to retention, experiential learning speaks for itself.
By John Gillis Jr.
According to The Conference Board’s “The Business Value of Leadership Development” report, “One of the most influential internal engines to drive change is a leadership development program that sets out to nurture management talent that is entrepreneurial, enterprisewide and globally recruited.”

Many agree with this sentiment and believe that for a company to seize competitive advantage for sustainability, it must invest in high-touch, face-to-face leadership development that is aligned with corporate strategy.

Unfortunately, most current leadership development efforts are falling short when it comes to the “high-touch” aspect.

Impact Shortfall
McKinsey & Co. estimated that leadership strength explained 80 percent of its sustainable performance. The Center for Creative Leadership reported that if done correctly, leadership development creates competitive advantage by driving strategy execution, navigating change, improving financial performance and retaining talent. Because of this noted impact, Deloitte previously reported that 85 percent of human resources leaders rate leadership pipeline as the top priority of companies. Willis Towers Watson and Development Dimensions International have published similar reports.
Dive In
Dive In
When it comes to retention, experiential learning speaks for itself.
By John Gillis Jr.
According to The Conference Board’s “The Business Value of Leadership Development” report, “One of the most influential internal engines to drive change is a leadership development program that sets out to nurture management talent that is entrepreneurial, enterprisewide and globally recruited.”

Many agree with this sentiment and believe that for a company to seize competitive advantage for sustainability, it must invest in high-touch, face-to-face leadership development that is aligned with corporate strategy.

Unfortunately, most current leadership development efforts are falling short when it comes to the “high-touch” aspect.

Impact Shortfall
McKinsey & Co. estimated that leadership strength explained 80 percent of its sustainable performance. The Center for Creative Leadership reported that if done correctly, leadership development creates competitive advantage by driving strategy execution, navigating change, improving financial performance and retaining talent. Because of this noted impact, Deloitte previously reported that 85 percent of human resources leaders rate leadership pipeline as the top priority of companies. Willis Towers Watson and Development Dimensions International have published similar reports.
Dive In
Healthy Learning: Modernizing Health Care’s L&D
The push to digital learning has come slowly in health care. Providence St. Joseph Health is one organization that is shifting its L&D model.
By Nicole Bunselmeyer
Health care’s foundational employee training lies in old-school brick-and-mortar academics, but the challenges facing the industry — including large technology rollouts, staff attraction and retention, compliance training and the influx of millennials to the health care workforce — mean learning and development departments have to figure out how to go digital to accommodate employees and the patients they serve.

This requires health care L&D departments to build out their learning technology suites carefully and find the delicate balance between employee needs and what the organization expects in order to serve patients and the community.

“It’s a definite challenge for us,” said Darci Hall, interim chief learning officer of multistate health care provider Providence St. Joseph Health. “We must figure out how to baby-step our older generation of learners, who are accustomed to ILT and only ILT, into possibly doing things in a digital space. So we say, OK, we’ll do an in-person event for, say, leadership training, but then you’re going to have virtual sessions that support it throughout the year.”

Healthy Learning: Modernizing Health Care’s L&D
Healthy Learning: Modernizing Health Care’s L&D
The push to digital learning has come slowly in health care. Providence St. Joseph Health is one organization that is shifting its L&D model.
By Nicole Bunselmeyer
Health care’s foundational employee training lies in old-school brick-and-mortar academics, but the challenges facing the industry — including large technology rollouts, staff attraction and retention, compliance training and the influx of millennials to the health care workforce — mean learning and development departments have to figure out how to go digital to accommodate employees and the patients they serve.

This requires health care L&D departments to build out their learning technology suites carefully and find the delicate balance between employee needs and what the organization expects in order to serve patients and the community.

“It’s a definite challenge for us,” said Darci Hall, interim chief learning officer of multistate health care provider Providence St. Joseph Health. “We must figure out how to baby-step our older generation of learners, who are accustomed to ILT and only ILT, into possibly doing things in a digital space. So we say, OK, we’ll do an in-person event for, say, leadership training, but then you’re going to have virtual sessions that support it throughout the year.”

Healthy Learning: Modernizing Health Care’s L&D
Highly successful women leaders are able to balance empathy and inclusiveness with assertiveness, ambition and drive. Ideally, all leaders should strive to arm themselves with these traits.
By Rick Koonce and Carol Vallone Mitchell
What does it take to be successful in business? A tough work ethic, being task-oriented, a willingness to put in long hours, dedication to one’s career, and having the right connections are a few characteristics that immediately come to mind. However, research shows that the small number of women who have risen to top positions in business often possess leadership traits quite different from those associated with successful men.

Traditionally, in the business world, men have been given what social psychologists describe as broad “stylistic latitude” to operate as leaders using formal power, position and authority. Think of the post-World War II U.S. corporation, where virtually all business executives were men. Corporations of that era were characterized by top-down, command-and-control organizational cultures, and lines of reporting authority strongly mirrored those of the military. It was the era of “the man in the gray flannel suit.” Women, when present in the workplace at all, were secretaries, typists and members of the night cleaning crew.

Today, of course, command-and-control corporate cultures are in decline (and disrepute), workforces are increasingly diverse, and a growing number of women are entering the workforce every year. They also are scaling the corporate ladder in many corporations, though men still significantly outnumber women in leadership positions.

Healthy Learning: Modernizing Health Care’s L&D
Healthy Learning: Modernizing Health Care’s L&D
Highly successful women leaders are able to balance empathy and inclusiveness with assertiveness, ambition and drive. Ideally, all leaders should strive to arm themselves with these traits.
By Rick Koonce and Carol Vallone Mitchell
What does it take to be successful in business? A tough work ethic, being task-oriented, a willingness to put in long hours, dedication to one’s career, and having the right connections are a few characteristics that immediately come to mind. However, research shows that the small number of women who have risen to top positions in business often possess leadership traits quite different from those associated with successful men.

Traditionally, in the business world, men have been given what social psychologists describe as broad “stylistic latitude” to operate as leaders using formal power, position and authority. Think of the post-World War II U.S. corporation, where virtually all business executives were men. Corporations of that era were characterized by top-down, command-and-control organizational cultures, and lines of reporting authority strongly mirrored those of the military. It was the era of “the man in the gray flannel suit.” Women, when present in the workplace at all, were secretaries, typists and members of the night cleaning crew.

Today, of course, command-and-control corporate cultures are in decline (and disrepute), workforces are increasingly diverse, and a growing number of women are entering the workforce every year. They also are scaling the corporate ladder in many corporations, though men still significantly outnumber women in leadership positions.

Case Study


A Winning Strategy

BY SARAH FISTER GALE

L

ast year, sales and service representatives from across Hyundai Motor dealerships had the opportunity to participate in a series of competitions to prove they knew more about each car and how to sell it than any of their peers. Over several months, thousands of reps from this $83 billion global automotive company competed in a series of “workarounds,” in which they presented a vehicle to a “customer,” explaining every feature and function starting with the hood and working back to the exhaust pipe.

“We don’t just judge them on what they know but how they link the value of those features to a customer’s daily life,” said Jared Dowdy, senior manager of national sales training for Hyundai Motor America. The competitions laddered up from local, to regional, to national competitions with prize money awarded at each stage. Ultimately, the top two winners from each country — 136 reps in all — were invited to Hyundai headquarters in Seoul, South Korea, for a final global customer experience competition — the Hyundai Global CX Championship.

Business Intelligence


Social Learning: An Ongoing Experiment
Social learning buy-in may require rethinking what is being measured to assess impact.
By Ashley St. John

P

sychologist Albert Bandura’s social learning theory suggests that people learn from one another through observation, imitation and modeling. In a famous series of experiments to demonstrate his theory, Bandura studied children’s behavior after they watched a human adult model act aggressively toward a Bobo doll — a toy with a rounded bottom that returns to an upright position after it has been knocked down. The experiments showed that children who were exposed to the aggressive model were more likely to show aggressive behavior themselves.

It’s a compelling theory, and many organizations incorporate social learning into their learning and development function, especially with the growing array of technologies available today to facilitate such learning.

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In Conclusion


The Workplace Self-Training Paradigm

Some responsibility for L&D has shifted from employer to worker DAVID BLAKE

David Blake, co-founder and executive chairman of Degreed

David Blake is co-founder and executive chairman of Degreed and co-author of “The Expertise Economy: How the Smartest Companies Use Learning to Engage, Compete, and Succeed” with Kelly Palmer.
He can be reached at editor@CLOmedia.com.

M

uch has been made of the abbreviation of employment tenure, now averaging just four years according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. And it’s true, the notion of a mortarboard-to-gold-watch career has been largely replaced by at-will employment, outsourcing and automation. Educating workers for lifelong careers has been disrupted by the searing pace of change.

But there’s something else happening that tends to get short shrift in the discussion about this new career normal. Some responsibility for learning and development has shifted from corporations to workers.

Traditionally, a graduate in an entry-level corporate job could expect a clear learning program and career path. Expertise was accumulated over years or decades as they moved up the ranks. Today, the shelf life of useful expertise is so short that even the best corporate L&D departments can’t reskill existing staff at the pace their organizations need. And with unemployment the lowest it’s been in decades, corporations can’t easily hire expertise from the outside, either.

Thanks for reading our May 2019 issue!

Thanks for reading our May 2019 issue!