November 2018

November 2018

Sponsored Content


Frontline Workers and the Skills for Tomorrow’s Economy

Training frontline workers for new skills can vault low-wage earners into middle class prosperity and boost corporate bottom lines.

What the government is doing to train frontline workers in the skills needed for tomorrow’s jobs.

I

n 2015, President Barack Obama launched a far-reaching federal program to educate the nation’s frontline workers. Titled the Upskill Initiative, the President specifically called on employers to train their vital but sometimes overlooked frontline workers. By doing so, these workers could progress to better-paying jobs, thus lifting themselves and their families into the middle class.

In his 2015 State of the Union address, President Obama urged companies to “offer more educational benefits and paid apprenticeships — opportunities that give workers the chance to earn high-paying jobs even if they don’t have a higher education.”

Sponsored Content


How to Design Education for Adults

A traditional college course designed for 18-year-old students isn’t an adult learning program just because it’s scheduled in the evening.

M

any companies implement a tuition reimbursement program with the aim of helping their employees prepare for industry changes and to advance in their careers. But employers are right to wonder if the degrees programs that their employees enroll in will be effective.

A key characteristic that employers should look for is whether the program is designed for adult learners in particular, because the difference can be critical.

Editor’s Letter


No Status Quo for the CLO

T

here’s no playbook for becoming a CLO, and if there’s one simple fact that shines through from the hundreds of formal interviews and countless more conversations I’ve had with learning leaders, that’s it.

The backgrounds of learning leaders are diverse, fascinating and often surprising.

There was a time when the majority of learning leaders grew up through traditional learning and development roles. They were classroom instructors, instructional designers and learning technology specialists.

According to recent research, that’s not the case anymore. A few months back, our research team at Chief Learning Officer decided to conduct a first-of-its-kind survey about the CLO role, asking practitioners to share their career path, how they developed themselves, the scope of their responsibilities and how they work.

November 2018 | Volume 17, Issue 9

on the cover: Photo by Stevie Chris

10


J.C. Penney’s Miya Maysent on her career journey; Casper Moerck of Siemens talks learning tech; and quick hits on what you’re using and reading.

30


Profile

Agatha Bordonaro
Michelle Braden prioritizes learning and development for Telus International’s 30,000 global employees.

56


Case Study

Sarah Fister Gale
A software apprenticeship program has cracked the code to produce engineers.

58


Business Intelligence

Mike Prokopeak
Mobile learning continues to make inroads into learning investment and delivery.

Features

24
Ave Rio
There are more women in education technology when compared to the technology industry as a whole, but far fewer when compared to the L&D industry. Several factors can explain the disparity within these three related fields.
42
Jay Tangney
Authentic ethics and compliance training is gaining traction and visibility in the corporate workspace. What does this mean for your company and how can you execute on it?
48
Tamar Elkeles
There are big business challenges facing global organizations today. To avoid the traps of the modern learning agenda, think social, mobile and global.
52
Julie Winkle Giulioni
Young workers tend to be the focus of development programs, but older workers also deserve to have their learning needs met.

Experts

16
Elliott Masie
CLOs Say the Darndest Things
18
Bob Mosher
We Must Lead the Charge for Change
20
Ken Blanchard
Finding a ‘Soar’ Spot
22
Lee Maxey
Taking the High Road
62
Amy Lui Abel and Stephanie Neal
#MeToo in Mentorship

Resources

4
No Status Quo for the CLO

Are you a part of the CLO Network?

Your Career


Your Career


Career Advice From

Miya Maysent

vice president of talent development and diversity, j.c. penney

Miya Maysent, vice president of talent development and diversity at J.C. Penney, shares her career journey and how she came into L&D.

What’s been your career path?

Mine might be a little bit different than the traditional — although I don’t know what the traditional path is anymore. My background is all in psychology. I began my education thinking I wanted to be a child psychologist — following in my family’s footsteps. My father was a therapist, so it was sort of like the family business. After completing my bachelor’s degree, the only thing you can do with a bachelor’s degree in psychology is either bartend or go to grad school. So, I did both. I went to grad school and got well into my studies and discovered that I was an absolute horrible therapist. I mean it sincerely — I pity the people I did therapy with. I had a professor who suggested industrial and organizational psychology might be a better fit. I followed that academically and then went into consulting for about 13 years. The foundational consulting was all in leadership selection and also in change management. Then, one of my clients asked if I was interested in starting up an OD [organizational development] function for them — and that led me into more of a corporate role. L&D wasn’t my stock and trade until I got into a corporate role and then we started bundling different pieces together. It was OD first, then it was training and development and talent management.

Practical Applications

Power Director
A tool I have found very useful in both training co-workers and helping our clientele understand new services we are offering is “Power Director.” Rather than sending out lengthy emails, I have been using “Power Director” to create easy-to-follow, step-by-step tutorials. This has been more effective in getting the message across, and people find videos easier to follow than written text.
Vanessa Bauer, K-12 private school office manager

Your Career


Your Career


What Are You Reading?

The Story of Philosophy

by Will Durant

After spending a certain amount of time in a censored environment (the past year in China and a few years ago in Saudi Arabia) some time is needed to reboot one’s overall way of thinking. After Saudi, it was a review of Drucker. Now I am going way back to the classic thinkers of philosophy to reboot my thinking. The works of great writers (like many artists) were not really appreciated, nor the true impact felt, until well after their death. That means many of them wrote knowing much of their life’s work would not really benefit them in their time. Maybe a few of us should take this same approach in this day and age of insurmountable misinformation. Sometimes you just need to step back and look at everything in context. It has been a most interesting and enlightening process.

Your Career


Your Career


Top of Mind

Experience API Will Bring Key Changes to L&D By Casper Moerck

Casper Moerck is head of learning technology at Siemens, where he is responsible for infrastructure and learning technology in the Americas.

A few years ago I first spoke about Experience API at the Masie conference in Orlando. I was excited by the Tin Can project and wanted to share my thoughts on how it could improve our ability to calculate return on investment. Since then, I have broadened my understanding of the topic. I recently had a conversation with Mike Rustici, who was part of the development of xAPI and sits at the helm of Watershed LRS.

One thing he said was that L&D will go through the same development that marketing has. For some reason, that stuck with me. I always think of the TV show, “Mad Men” when the word “marketing” comes to mind. Do you recall the episode where Don Draper pitches the “pass the Heinz” campaign? That’s how it worked back in the days: Dazzle them with elegant ideas, flashy images and your own charm and charisma.

imperatives


CLOs Say the Darndest Things

Questions rock learning. Have the courage to ask them By Elliott Masie

Elliott Masie is the chairman and CLO of The Masie Center’s Learning Consortium and CEO of The Masie Center, an international think tank focused on learning and workplace productivity.
He can be reached at editor@CLOmedia.com.

C

hief learning officers often have favorite statements, expressions and points of view. These can be key as they help shape the learning culture and knowledge ecosystem of the enterprise.

The most powerful words from a CLO can be in the form of questions. Asking a provocative question can be the ultimate power tool. Statements may or may not be heard, understood, responded to or remembered. Targeted questions can be multiplied and amplified.

Here are three general examples before I share my own CLO question list:

  • To a departing employee: What did you learn while in our organization and how did you learn it?
  • To a business leader: What skills do employees in your group need to build and maintain in terms of changing roles, technologies and/or marketplace shifts?
  • To a CEO: What are buzzwords or terminologies that you hear but don’t fully understand (e.g., blockchain layered servers)?

selling up, selling down


We Must Lead the Charge for Change

Workflow-embedded learning’s time is now By Bob Mosher

Bob Mosher is a senior partner and chief learning evangelist for APPLY Synergies, a strategic consulting firm.
He can be reached at editor@CLOmedia.com.

C

hange is hard, especially in the learning and development field. The irony of this revelation is that those of us in the L&D profession are supposed to be in the business of helping our learners navigate change.

We want our learners to be flexible and self-motivated. Yet, my experience is that we are often our own worst enemies at exhibiting these same characteristics. I spend a lot of my professional life being invited into organizations by the L&D department to help them introduce and adopt new learning technologies and approaches, and when asked which stakeholders are often the most resistant to these changes, it’s the L&D team itself that tops my list.

leadership


Finding a ‘Soar’ Spot

What does it mean to lead at a higher level? By ken blanchard

Ken Blanchard is chief spiritual officer of The Ken Blanchard Cos. and co-author of “Servant Leadership in Action.”
He can be reached at editor@CLOmedia.com.

E

very day, leaders around the world have the opportunity to choose to serve others instead of themselves. But when you look at leaders of businesses, churches, educational institutions or even countries, it’s clear that many have chosen to be self-serving rather than to serve.

Why is that? It’s because leaders everywhere have been conditioned to think about leadership only in terms of power and control. They don’t have a different leadership role model. People need a better benchmark for leadership if they are going to lead their organizations at a higher level.

MAKING THE GRADE


Taking the High Road

The path back to civil discourse includes higher education BY LEE MAXEY

Lee Maxey is CEO of MindMax, a marketing and enrollment management services company.
He can be reached at editor@CLOmedia.com.

L

ast July 4, the Los Angeles Times editorial board wrote that “There is cause today to be nervous about our national debate, in part because the tactics have moved from merely attacking each other’s arguments, or even attacking each other, to attacking the legitimacy of the institutions and conventions that allow the debate to take place.”

We can, and must, return to civil discourse in the public square. There are millions of homes across this country wherein civil discourse still happens. In fact, home is where we learn how to air grievances respectfully, acquire facts and discuss opinions intelligently. If higher education can offer one thing to our nation, it’s building on what we’re supposed to learn at home: Looking at things from someone else’s perspective, critically (in an analytical sense) and compassionately. And if we haven’t learned these lessons from our family, then colleges can pick up the mantle and teach us to lift our speech to a higher level.

There are more women in education technology when compared to the technology industry as a whole, but far fewer when compared to the L&D industry. Several factors can explain the disparity within these three related fields.

By Ave Rio

Education has historically been a female-dominated industry. Currently, more than 70 percent of teachers in U.S. public schools are women, according to the National Center for Education Statistics. In learning and development, data from the Chief Learning Officer Business Intelligence Board found that women make up 60 percent of training and development managers. Similarly, the Association for Talent Development’s 2017 salary survey, notes that 70 percent of talent development professionals working in the U.S. are women.

In the $76 billion global education and talent technology market, however, women aren’t as easy to find. From 2015-17, at the education and talent technology ASU GSV X Summit, just 30 percent of the 300 to 400 companies that attended were led or founded by a woman. However, it is increasing — in 2018, 39 percent of the presenting companies were female-founded. In the female-dominated education industry, why aren’t there more women running ed-tech companies?

Well, it’s hard to be a woman in tech. While there are slim numbers of women in ed-tech roles, there are substantially more women in that niche when compared to the general tech industry. According to a March 2018 report by Entelo, only 18 percent of U.S. tech roles are held by women and the ratio decreases with seniority. At entry and midlevel positions in tech, women hold 19 percent of roles. At more senior levels, the percentage of women drops to 16 percent and at the executive level, it’s just 10 percent. Further, women hold just under a quarter of the world’s STEM jobs.

There are more women in education technology when compared to the technology industry as a whole, but far fewer when compared to the L&D industry. Several factors can explain the disparity within these three related fields.

By Ave Rio

Education has historically been a female-dominated industry. Currently, more than 70 percent of teachers in U.S. public schools are women, according to the National Center for Education Statistics. In learning and development, data from the Chief Learning Officer Business Intelligence Board found that women make up 60 percent of training and development managers. Similarly, the Association for Talent Development’s 2017 salary survey, notes that 70 percent of talent development professionals working in the U.S. are women.

In the $76 billion global education and talent technology market, however, women aren’t as easy to find. From 2015-17, at the education and talent technology ASU GSV X Summit, just 30 percent of the 300 to 400 companies that attended were led or founded by a woman. However, it is increasing — in 2018, 39 percent of the presenting companies were female-founded. In the female-dominated education industry, why aren’t there more women running ed-tech companies?

Well, it’s hard to be a woman in tech. While there are slim numbers of women in ed-tech roles, there are substantially more women in that niche when compared to the general tech industry. According to a March 2018 report by Entelo, only 18 percent of U.S. tech roles are held by women and the ratio decreases with seniority. At entry and midlevel positions in tech, women hold 19 percent of roles. At more senior levels, the percentage of women drops to 16 percent and at the executive level, it’s just 10 percent. Further, women hold just under a quarter of the world’s STEM jobs.

Profile


Telus About Your Global Learning

Michelle Braden prioritizes learning and development for Telus International’s 30,000 global employees.

By Agatha Bordonaro

Growing up in Overland Park, Kansas, a busy suburb of Kansas City, Michelle Braden didn’t have dreams of becoming a learning professional. In fact, she didn’t take much to education in general.

“I was probably one of the worst students,” Braden said, laughing. “I always had a hard time staying engaged.”

But that very quality is, today, what makes her a powerhouse in the learning industry, as she continuously evaluates what keeps people engaged and how she can improve the learning experience. “I guess if I were a good student right off the bat,” Braden said, “it probably wouldn’t have helped me get to where I am.

Before You Use Another Assessment, Read This.

HR leaders who integrate pre-employment assessments often use one tool to help identify the best candidates and a different resource to develop them once on board. However, using multiple solutions often comes at a substantial cost and lacks consistency. So you may be thinking, “Why can’t there be one reliable assessment I can use for selection, coaching, and development that makes sense and won’t break the bank?”

A New Way Forward

Assessments of the past typically measured individual traits without meaningful context. Today’s best assessments can predict with a much higher degree of certainty how someone is likely to perform in a given role, whether that individual is a new hire or an existing employee.

The Case for Moodle & Totara

Understanding the Open-Source eLearning Ecosystem

By Adina Sapp

Not surprisingly, recent data from CLO’s 2018 Learning State of the Industry survey found that budget is one of the greatest L&D technology challenges for the next year, along with data integration and the need to align L&D technology operations, practices, and systems across different business units. Pricing is the top consideration for any new L&D technology platform, followed by ease of use and product features. Analytics, ease of integration with existing ERP/in-house software and vendor support are also highly prioritized.1

Corporations of all sizes around the world are finding that open source eLearning is the best answer to their budgetary, integration and analytics requirements for enterprise education. Of the many learning platform options out there, Moodle is the most widely used, with a user base of more than 130 million worldwide.2

Learning from Others in the Digital Age

Don’t overlook the importance of vicarious learning for sharing critical knowledge at work

By Christopher G. Myers, PhD

People today have access to more information than at any point in human history. A 2014 report estimated the size of the internet at 1 billion unique websites, and by 2021, global internet traffic is expected to reach 3.3 zettabytes. That is 3.3 trillion gigabytes of information moving around online – enough, by my rough estimate, to fill 12.9 billion iPhones (the 256GB iPhone X, to be specific).

It’s no surprise, then, that one of the most common ways we seek out and learn new things is by going online — embodying the 21st-century learning mantra “I don’t know… hang on, I’ll Google it.” However, because of this volume of readily available information and knowledge, we risk forgetting one of the most important ways people learn, particularly at work — by learning from the experiences of others, or vicarious learning.

Building resilience to changing conditions

New research from ICF and HCI shows how vanguard organizations navigate change management through a strong coaching culture

By Tim Harnett

It’s been more than 20 years since John Kotter’s seminal book on change management, Leading Change. In 1996, Kotter found that only a third of change management efforts succeeded.1 In the years since, change has come at organizations more rapidly, affecting leadership change, acquisitions, new product development and more.

Recent research suggests the needle hasn’t moved much. According to a 2016 report from the Human Capital Institute (HCI), 77 percent of HR practitioners and leaders report that their organization is in a constant state of change, and 85 percent report unsuccessful major change management initiatives in the past two years.2 However, new data from HCI and the International Coach Federation (ICF) shows that there are steps organizations can take to increase employees’ resilience during times of change.

Authentic ethics and compliance training is gaining traction and visibility in the corporate workspace. What does this mean for your company and how can you execute on it?

By Jay Tangney

Companies continue to face increasingly complex operational and regulatory environments in 2018. Regardless of your business, how your employees navigate and decide complex issues will define how your company operates. Simply put, integrity is a “must have” to survive. Without a solid ethical foundation in both the C-suite and throughout operations, the hard reality is that your company is highly likely to fail and perhaps, fail with irreversible and draconian consequences, especially if aggressive and motivated regulatory and enforcement authorities become involved.

One result of this plain business reality is that companies and shareholders are increasing their focus on integrity-based ethical behavior. Civil and criminal investigations and cases have long been a business reality in the United States. Today, a new layer of moral scrutiny has been added as we evaluate fundamentals of respect in the workplace, and diversity and inclusion.

Yes, acting within the letter and spirit of the law and treating each other with respect at all times is the right and moral thing to do, and certainly for many leaders and shareholders that reason alone is enough. For those more financially motivated however, authentic ethical and respectful behavior mitigates risk and makes sense for the bottom line. Ethical behavior is in the best interest of your enterprise, and if you don’t believe that, pick up any major newspaper and review how many companies are immersed in complicated legal investigations because of bad or illegal conduct by employees. Business in America is immersed in redefining what is OK and what is no longer tolerated, and this cleansing, along with a hard push toward diversity and inclusion, is itself the right thing to do and long overdue. This renewed vigor in mandating ethical conduct impacts all industries, and a deliberate and enforceable ethics and compliance training program is a prerequisite for your team and your business to succeed.

Authentic ethics and compliance training is gaining traction and visibility in the corporate workspace. What does this mean for your company and how can you execute on it?

By Jay Tangney

Companies continue to face increasingly complex operational and regulatory environments in 2018. Regardless of your business, how your employees navigate and decide complex issues will define how your company operates. Simply put, integrity is a “must have” to survive. Without a solid ethical foundation in both the C-suite and throughout operations, the hard reality is that your company is highly likely to fail and perhaps, fail with irreversible and draconian consequences, especially if aggressive and motivated regulatory and enforcement authorities become involved.

One result of this plain business reality is that companies and shareholders are increasing their focus on integrity-based ethical behavior. Civil and criminal investigations and cases have long been a business reality in the United States. Today, a new layer of moral scrutiny has been added as we evaluate fundamentals of respect in the workplace, and diversity and inclusion.

Yes, acting within the letter and spirit of the law and treating each other with respect at all times is the right and moral thing to do, and certainly for many leaders and shareholders that reason alone is enough. For those more financially motivated however, authentic ethical and respectful behavior mitigates risk and makes sense for the bottom line. Ethical behavior is in the best interest of your enterprise, and if you don’t believe that, pick up any major newspaper and review how many companies are immersed in complicated legal investigations because of bad or illegal conduct by employees. Business in America is immersed in redefining what is OK and what is no longer tolerated, and this cleansing, along with a hard push toward diversity and inclusion, is itself the right thing to do and long overdue. This renewed vigor in mandating ethical conduct impacts all industries, and a deliberate and enforceable ethics and compliance training program is a prerequisite for your team and your business to succeed.

To avoid the traps of the modern learning agenda, think social, mobile and global.

Increased complexity, competition and change. Rapid technology evolution, disruption and speed. Emerging markets and global growth. These are the big business challenges facing global organizations today. At the same time, learning and talent organizations are facing our own set of significant challenges.

  • The future of work and developing people for jobs that don’t even exist yet.
  • Creating a learning and talent ecosystem that maximizes growth and employee engagement.
  • “Re-skilling” talent to drive business success.

Where do we begin?

These challenges provide us with not just an opportunity, but a big responsibility for all talent leaders today. For businesses to thrive in this changing organizational landscape, we must address these opportunities and take action. We are in a time of change and reinvention, individuals need to change in order for organizations to change. Ninety three percent of CEOs are in the process of changing their talent strategy, according to PwC’s 2017 “Annual Global CEO Survey. This is driving CLOs and talent leaders to evolve their work, products, services and mindsets to create talent plans that reflect the changes in today’s workforce. These plans go beyond learning and development and truly encompass the entire learning and talent ecosystem — from attraction to development to retention. We need to strategically influence the entire employee life cycle.

To avoid the traps of the modern learning agenda, think social, mobile and global.

Increased complexity, competition and change. Rapid technology evolution, disruption and speed. Emerging markets and global growth. These are the big business challenges facing global organizations today. At the same time, learning and talent organizations are facing our own set of significant challenges.

  • The future of work and developing people for jobs that don’t even exist yet.
  • Creating a learning and talent ecosystem that maximizes growth and employee engagement.
  • “Re-skilling” talent to drive business success.

Where do we begin?

These challenges provide us with not just an opportunity, but a big responsibility for all talent leaders today. For businesses to thrive in this changing organizational landscape, we must address these opportunities and take action. We are in a time of change and reinvention, individuals need to change in order for organizations to change. Ninety three percent of CEOs are in the process of changing their talent strategy, according to PwC’s 2017 “Annual Global CEO Survey. This is driving CLOs and talent leaders to evolve their work, products, services and mindsets to create talent plans that reflect the changes in today’s workforce. These plans go beyond learning and development and truly encompass the entire learning and talent ecosystem — from attraction to development to retention. We need to strategically influence the entire employee life cycle.

Young workers tend to be the focus of development programs, but older workers also deserve to have their learning needs met.

JULIE WINKLE GIULIONI

Today’s workplace reflects unprecedented diversity. Organizations experience both the benefits and challenges of bringing together people from different races, with different sexual identities, who practice different religions, speak different languages, demonstrate different abilities and whose ages span the greatest number of generations ever to labor together in modern history.

Over the past several years, considerable time and energy have been invested in understanding and addressing the needs of younger workers. New platforms and approaches have emerged that better meet the working and learning styles and cadence of millennials. But, are we as concerned about older workers — and, more importantly, should we be? Consider these realities.

Demographic reality: The workplace is currently home to increasing numbers of older workers. Between 1960 and 2016, the World Bank reports that average life expectancy grew from nearly 53 to 72 years. According to Pew Research and the Bureau of Labor Statistics, 18.8 percent or 9 million Americans 65 and older report working full or part time.

Biological reality: According to Lynda Gratton and Andres Scott, authors of “The-100 Year Life,” today’s 20-year-olds have a 50 percent chance of living to 100. Technological and medical advances allow people not only to live but also to contribute longer. All of this makes working longer — both in terms of number of years and later in life — the new normal.

Economic reality: Unemployment remains at historically low levels, resulting in a highly competitive labor market. Cities have begun offering cash payments to attract workers, and companies are taking extraordinary measures to enhance their employment brands. All of this conspires to perhaps encourage a new focus on previously undervalued resources and a move toward more inclusive hiring practices.

Competitive or workplace reality: It’s an uncertain and rapidly changing environment that most organizations find themselves navigating. According to the research of Josh Bersin, the half-life of today’s technical skills is just two years. Organizations must routinely disrupt themselves; this is only possible when employees (all employees) are willing to engage in their own disruption through ongoing learning and skills development.

Young workers tend to be the focus of development programs, but older workers also deserve to have their learning needs met.

JULIE WINKLE GIULIONI

Today’s workplace reflects unprecedented diversity. Organizations experience both the benefits and challenges of bringing together people from different races, with different sexual identities, who practice different religions, speak different languages, demonstrate different abilities and whose ages span the greatest number of generations ever to labor together in modern history.

Over the past several years, considerable time and energy have been invested in understanding and addressing the needs of younger workers. New platforms and approaches have emerged that better meet the working and learning styles and cadence of millennials. But, are we as concerned about older workers — and, more importantly, should we be? Consider these realities.

Demographic reality: The workplace is currently home to increasing numbers of older workers. Between 1960 and 2016, the World Bank reports that average life expectancy grew from nearly 53 to 72 years. According to Pew Research and the Bureau of Labor Statistics, 18.8 percent or 9 million Americans 65 and older report working full or part time.

Biological reality: According to Lynda Gratton and Andres Scott, authors of “The-100 Year Life,” today’s 20-year-olds have a 50 percent chance of living to 100. Technological and medical advances allow people not only to live but also to contribute longer. All of this makes working longer — both in terms of number of years and later in life — the new normal.

Case Study


Seismic Shifts in Hiring

BY SARAH FISTER GALE

H

iring software engineers at a reasonable price has never been more difficult. Fully 86 percent of tech hiring managers and recruiters surveyed by Indeed say finding qualified talent to be a challenge, and more than half admit to hiring people who don’t meet job requirements out of desperation to fill these roles.

Techtonic Group was nearly one of these companies.

The 12-year-old full-service software development firm in Boulder, Colorado, used to offshore most of its development to Armenia, but in 2013 they decided it was time to bring the work back in-house. However, they quickly realized that even entry-level developers were very expensive and in short supply. “We thought that there has got to be a better way,” said Chris Magyar, director of Techtonic Group Academy.

Business Intelligence


Mobile Learning on the March

Mobile learning continues to make inroads into learning investment and delivery.

By Mike Prokopeak

S

Sometime in the last year, we crossed the mobile Rubicon.

The learning industry reached the tipping point when it comes to the use of mobile platforms and approaches for employee learning. It’s unlikely we will ever go back.

According to a survey of the Chief Learning Officer Business Intelligence Board, a majority of CLOs (Figure 1) now expect to invest in content for mobile learning. While this is only a slight uptick year over year (from 49 percent in 2017 to 52 percent in 2018), it is nonetheless symbolic of the yearslong trend in corporate learning.

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in conclusion


#MeToo in Mentorship

Highlighting new lessons in corporate learning By Amy Lui Abel and Stephanie Neal

Amy Lui Abel, Ph.D., is managing director of human capital research at The Conference Board.
Stephanie Neal is a research scientist at global leadership company DDI. They can be reached at editor@CLOmedia.com.

I

n just 18 months, more than 400 high-profile executives and employees have been exposed by the #MeToo movement.

But despite the gains of the movement it has brought unintended consequences. About a third of male managers now feel uncomfortable working alone with a woman — more than twice as many as before. And nearly half feel uncomfortable participating in common work activities with women, including mentoring them.

This consequence of #MeToo is occurring just as the value of mentoring women is clearer than ever: Our latest leadership research found that of the nearly 2,500 companies studied those with at least 30 percent women leaders — and at least 20 percent women senior leaders — have a major competitive edge. They have about a one-and-a-half times greater chance of experiencing sustained, profitable growth. They are also more collaborative, have higher-quality leadership, are more likely to experiment in pursuit of innovation and are faster-growing and more agile than their counterparts.

Why should these findings grab the ear of every male leader?

Thanks for reading our November 2018 issue!