October 2018

October 2018

Sponsored Content


How Online Degrees Build Work-Relevant Skills

As technology use increases in the workplace, employers need even more workers with digital and technology skills. Online courses may be the answer.

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orkplaces are now more connected, automated and digitized, which means employers increasingly need workers with the technical skills and digital knowledge to thrive in their roles. This applies even to traditional industries such as manufacturing, retail, finance and healthcare. There are fewer truly non-technical roles.

In an analysis of 27 million online job postings, labor market researcher Burning Glass found that 82 percent of middle-skill jobs now require some level of digital skills, and that even positions requiring baseline digital skills (such as productivity software and word processing) pay 17 percent higher wages than non-digital jobs. Nonprofit public policy organization The Brookings Institution reported that between 2002 and 2016, the share of total jobs in the United States requiring digital knowledge rose from 45 percent to 70 percent.

Sponsored Content


Why Upper Management Buy-In is Critical to Workplace Development Success

The majority of organizations have workplace learning programs, but these programs need the backing of the senior leadership to succeed.

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early 90 percent of organizations offer educational development opportunities for their frontline employees, according to a 2016 survey from the Institute for Corporate Productivity (i4CP) and the Aspen Institute’s UpSkill America. Yet 58 percent say only about half of their workers take advantage of the program.

What’s more, while 80 percent of employers extend generous tuition assistance benefits to their employees, those same companies sometimes make it hard for frontline workers to enroll in higher education programs. Many require workers to be on the job for 6 to 12 months before they’re eligible. That’s too long a wait — for both worker and company.

Editor’s Letter


For a Limited Time Only

S

ears was the undisputed king of retail when I was growing up.

Heading back to school? Sears had you covered with all the clothes and supplies you could possibly need. Washing machine went kaput? The Sears appliance store offered choices and styles to fit your needs.

Need a power drill? Aisles of Craftsman tools fit whatever your home improvement project might be. Fitness equipment? Check. New tires for your car? Check. Mattresses? Rest assured. Sears had it.

Sears stores were everywhere, from cities to suburbs to small towns. And in the rare event there wasn’t a store nearby, you could order just about anything and everything in the Sears catalog and have it delivered to you.

October 2018 | Volume 17, Issue 8

on the cover: Photo by John Harrington

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This month, Chief Learning Officer debuts a new section focused on helping you navigate and succeed in your career.

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Profile

Sarah Fister Gale
Sheila Jagannathan is helping transform the way World Bank creates and disseminates content to staff and clients across the globe.

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Case Study

Sarah Fister Gale
Advertising firm Leo Burnett is using mindfulness training for leaders to make everyone more productive.

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Business Intelligence

Mike Prokopeak
Data indicate a more complicated picture about learning delivery beyond the simple assumptions.

Features

24
Ave Rio
One year later: How #MeToo has affected the workplace.
42
Mark Nevins and John Hillen
Help leading executives cultivate a culture of leadership.

48
Sarah Fister Gale
Could apprenticeship programs and corporate universities be the solution to the deep end of the talent gap?
54
Daniel Fraga and Christophe Mallet
Immersive technologies are at the forefront of fundamental learning and development transformation.

Experts

16
Michael E. Echols
Is a College Degree Obsolete?
18
Josh Bersin
LXP: Poised for Center Stage
20
Jack J. Phillips & Patti P. Phillips
Stepping Up to the ROI Challenge
22
David DeFilippo
Working Forward and Backward
66
Paul Eder
Supporting Your Firestarters

Resources

4
For a Limited Time Only

Are you a part of the CLO Network?

Your Career


Your Career


Career Advice From

Julie Betts

Enterprise Learning Leader, NCR Corp.

Chief Learning Officer recently spoke with Julie Betts, enterprise learning leader at NCR Corp. about her career progression and how she came into L&D.

You didn’t begin your career as a learning leader. You were in customer-facing roles at Pitney Bowes. Can you tell us about the trigger moment that brought you into L&D?

I graduated from Michigan State University with a science degree. I was interested in pursuing a role as an account manager sales executive in the pharmaceutical industry. Looking to get some experience, I started with Pitney Bowes. I worked in the sales capacity for several years and one of the things I noticed very early on in my career, specifically in a sales role, [was] those sellers that are successful are educating their customers. They are working to become that trusted adviser to the clients that they support. You really have to know your stuff to do that and really understand the industry trends and those drivers to bring those forward to your customer. I realized that I had a passion for that. I enjoyed bringing my knowledge forward to the customer and it helped me make money — which is a beautiful thing. I was able to transfer into a learning role, which brought me from Detroit to Peachtree City, Georgia, where our national training center was at the time. At that point I became what they call a classroom educator.

Your Career


Your Career


What Are You Reading?

Make Your Mark: A Guidebook for the Brave Hearted

by Margie Warrell

I choose to read books to invite reflection and personal growth in my own life and work. Margie’s book is a wonderful reflection tool for getting clear on what you want, getting in touch with the ways of thinking, being able to add or detract from that goal and giving a sense of priority and phasing so that you progress against that goal. From my work in leader development as an executive coach in a management consulting firm, I have observed and asserted that the more aware we are, the more effective we can be. Awareness puts us in a place of choice. A moment in time where we can change or choose a mindset, behavior or next action that results in a better outcome.

Your Career


Your Career


Top of Mind

Learning in the Age of Acceleration By Jesse Jackson

Jesse Jackson is chief learning officer of consumer and community banking training functions at JPMorgan Chase. Responsible for the management, direction and strategy of consumer and community banking training functions, Jackson’s globally distributed learning team supports more than 150,000 employees.

Responsible L&D professionals are rapidly responding to the fact that we are living in an increasingly transformative period. This new period, classified as the age of acceleration, is described by kinetic changes occurring across our collective professional and personal experiences. This acceleration is also illustrated by massive disruption happening at high velocity to our traditional business practices. It is an age in which entire industries are being reshaped with routine business models being rendered useless in favor of more agile people, plans and processes. It’s a period where the premium for more innovative and effective corporate learning designs and solutions has never been more important.

BUSINESS IMPACT


Is a College Degree Obsolete?

A human capital strategy requires training and education By Michael E. Echols

Michael E. Echols is principal and founder of Human Capital LLC and author of “Your Future Is Calling.”
He can be reached at editor@CLOmedia.com.

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t’s a broad question heard often these days: “Is a college degree worth it?” This question is most often asked with regard to individuals, but let’s examine it from the company perspective.

We can start with a brief look at the value proposition of training. Training is most often driven by investment in a company balance sheet asset of strategic importance to near-term financial performance. As an example, a commitment to Salesforce.com software is not only a software investment, it is a substantial commitment to a strategic framework for capturing data and servicing customers. Employees not only are required to know what screens to access and what keys to hit and when, but they need to be proficient in the “how to” of the software. This all requires training dictated by the software’s architecture.

BEST PRACTICES


LXP: Poised for Center Stage

The learning experience market has reached a turning point By Josh Bersin

Josh Bersin is an industry analyst and founder of Bersin by Deloitte.
He can be reached at editor@CLOmedia.com.

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he recent acquisition of Pathgather, a pioneer in learning experience solutions, by Degreed, a leading content provider founded around the principle of “jailbreaking the degree,” marked an important turning point in the learning experience market.

The coming together of these two visionary companies emphasizes the importance now placed on learner experience, which was once viewed as a “nice to have” bonus of corporate training that came after enrollment numbers, completion rates, time spent and other administrative-focused measurements.

ACCOUNTABILITY


Stepping Up to the ROI Challenge

Connecting leadership development to ROI BY JACK J. PHILLIPS AND PATTI P. PHILLIPS

Jack J. Phillips is the chairman, and Patti P. Phillips is president and CEO of the ROI Institute.
They can be reached at editor@CLOmedia.com.

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n his 2017 Chief Learning Officer article, “The Business Case for Leadership Development,” William C. Byham, founder and CEO of Development Dimensions International, notes the following: “An article in McKinsey Quarterly accused U.S. companies of lavishing $14 billion per year on programs to nurture their leaders while seeing little in return.” The Wall Street Journal ran an article a few years ago titled “So Much Training, So Little to Show for It.” And the authors of an October 2016 article in Harvard Business Review referred to leadership development programs as the “great training robbery.”

Some estimates put the annual investment in leadership development in the U.S. at $50 billion. When the cost of travel and the time of leaders involved increases, that amount increases to more than $100 billion. Globally, the amount is more than $500 billion.

The considerable need for leadership development but low expectation of a documented return on it presents a quandary for CLOs who understand how critical it is to develop their organizations’ leaders.

ON THE FRONT LINE


Working Forward and Backward

Start with quick wins to establish a master plan BY DAVID DeFILIPPO

David DeFilippo is chief learning officer for Suffolk.
He can be reached at editor@CLOmedia.com.

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ike any field, the learning and talent profession requires a certain amount of expertise that comes from a combination of education and experience. Along with those capabilities there are different opinions and approaches to carrying out this work, all of which are valid in their own right. As practitioners, we need to leverage our skills and experience to achieve results for the sake of our organizations. Therein lies one of the perennial challenges between developing perfect versus practical solutions.

The #MeToo movement went viral in October 2017. Today, it continues to spread awareness about sexual harassment and misconduct, but it appears little has been done by organization leaders to produce much substantial change in their workplaces.

A new study by leadership training company VitalSmarts shows just that. The study of more than 1,100 people found that only 31 percent of employees observed anything more than small changes to their workplace since the movement began.

Emily Gregory, vice president of development and delivery at VitalSmarts, has concerns about whether the #MeToo movement is simply a moment or truly a movement in the way that it creates long-term sustainable change. “There’s been so much awareness that has been built, but I think the behavior change is going to take longer to come,” Gregory said. She said part of why it’s hard for organizations to change is that the bad behavior has been entrenched for so long in workplace cultures. “Your world is perfectly organized to get the results you’re currently experiencing.”

Learning leaders are discovering that raising employees’ awareness about sexual harassment and misconduct through symbolic compliance or “check-the-box” training is not enough. Rather, a focus on behavior-based training, open communication and accountably from leadership is needed to drive change.

The #MeToo movement went viral in October 2017. Today, it continues to spread awareness about sexual harassment and misconduct, but it appears little has been done by organization leaders to produce much substantial change in their workplaces.

A new study by leadership training company VitalSmarts shows just that. The study of more than 1,100 people found that only 31 percent of employees observed anything more than small changes to their workplace since the movement began.

Emily Gregory, vice president of development and delivery at VitalSmarts, has concerns about whether the #MeToo movement is simply a moment or truly a movement in the way that it creates long-term sustainable change. “There’s been so much awareness that has been built, but I think the behavior change is going to take longer to come,” Gregory said. She said part of why it’s hard for organizations to change is that the bad behavior has been entrenched for so long in workplace cultures. “Your world is perfectly organized to get the results you’re currently experiencing.”

Learning leaders are discovering that raising employees’ awareness about sexual harassment and misconduct through symbolic compliance or “check-the-box” training is not enough. Rather, a focus on behavior-based training, open communication and accountably from leadership is needed to drive change.

Profile


Teaching the World

Sheila Jagannathan is helping transform the way the World Bank creates and disseminates content to staff and clients across the globe.

By Sarah Fister Gale

As a child, Sheila Jagannathan spent long hours with her grandfather, a Sanskrit scholar who taught her about the ancient texts and the importance of continuing to improve your intellect. “He inspired me to follow a path of lifelong learning,” Jagannathan said.

Later while at Boston University, she was further inspired by the work being done on computer-based learning and artificial intelligence for education. That led her to change her coursework to education technology with a focus on intelligence systems that provide an adaptive learning environment. It was still the 1990s, when such technologies were nascent in the field of education. But over her career they have blossomed, and Jagannathan, now lead learning specialist and program manager of World Bank’s Open Learning Campus, or OLC, has been active in this evolution.

Microlearning: are you doing it right?

What microlearning is (and what it isn’t)

By Tim Harnett

Microlearning. Everyone’s talking about it, and it’s been hailed as a “great way to reinforce knowledge,”¹ “an antidote to the abundance and complexity of information”² and “so important”³ to navigating the changing world of work.

But is microlearning just the newest learning trend? Or is it an idea with long-term value?

What it is: At its heart, microlearning is a strategy that facilitates single concept learning. It’s a modern approach to workplace learning, designed to deliver targeted lessons within an employee’s workflow. Microlearning doesn’t replace traditional learning strategies, but rather complements them by providing learning opportunities to upskill employees in the moment of need.

First Things First: A Holistic View of Human Capital Development

Your company has announced an ambitious new mission for 2020: to lead the world in XYZ production and services. As the L&D leader, what hard skills, soft skills, knowledge and talent do you need to accomplish that mission?

What do you focus on first? What skills will have the greatest near-term impact? What will be important to sustain the company through the competitive assaults that undoubtedly will come if you’re successful?

The advantages of eLearning

When building an eLearning program, take a strategic approach to boost employee engagement, collaboration and retention

By Tim Harnett

These days, there is an increased focus on employee engagement and retention, and as the labor market tightens, organizations should prioritize keeping high-value employees in-house. At the same time, changing market conditions mean all employees will need new skills and competencies. Creating ongoing competency groups for increased knowledge retention should be a priority. However, these learning objectives can’t always be addressed with in-person training, which can be time-consuming and costly to deliver. In this context, eLearning takes on greater importance, as organizations look for more efficient ways to train their high-value employees and align eLearning objectives to corporate goals.

Enabling employees who will drive your business into the future and beyond

How digital dexterity is a powerful tool against disruption and change

By Tim Harnett

Organizations today all struggle for relevance and longevity. With digital disruption affecting every industry, the average company tenure is predicted to shrink from 24 to 12 years by 2027. The lifespan of an organization depends on its ability to adapt to new technologies and processes, and failure to adapt to digital change shortens that lifespan. Both traditional and newer industries face internal disruption and external innovation-driven changes, forcing everybody to reassess how best to prepare employees for the new reality of work.

A culture of leadership is key to organizational success. To develop their teams, learning executives focus on three dimensions: goals, others and self.

You’re an anomaly if you have never encountered a “stall” — an inflection point where you suddenly seem unable to get the stellar results you strive for. When executives hit a stall, they tend to redouble their efforts to engineer a revival through reorganizing, bringing in outside experts, hiring new executives who have “been there before,” building organizational infrastructure, running more analytics or transforming business processes. In other words, they do the things that have worked for them in the past, addressing complex problems with proven solutions.

A culture of leadership is key to organizational success. To develop their teams, learning executives focus on three dimensions: goals, others and self.

You’re an anomaly if you have never encountered a “stall” — an inflection point where you suddenly seem unable to get the stellar results you strive for. When executives hit a stall, they tend to redouble their efforts to engineer a revival through reorganizing, bringing in outside experts, hiring new executives who have “been there before,” building organizational infrastructure, running more analytics or transforming business processes. In other words, they do the things that have worked for them in the past, addressing complex problems with proven solutions.

A culture of leadership is key to organizational success. To develop their teams, learning executives focus on three dimensions: goals, others and self.

You’re an anomaly if you have never encountered a “stall” — an inflection point where you suddenly seem unable to get the stellar results you strive for. When executives hit a stall, they tend to redouble their efforts to engineer a revival through reorganizing, bringing in outside experts, hiring new executives who have “been there before,” building organizational infrastructure, running more analytics or transforming business processes. In other words, they do the things that have worked for them in the past, addressing complex problems with proven solutions.

Could apprenticeship programs and corporate universities be the solution to the deep end of the talent gap?

BY SARAH FISTER GALE

These days, every company is a technology company, which means demand for IT talent is never going to go away. And despite aggressive efforts to push teens toward STEM degree paths, colleges are just not graduating enough software engineers, coders and other tech talent to meet current hiring demands.

Sixty-five percent of tech leaders say the skills shortage is the highest they’ve seen in a decade, according to the 2018 “Harvey Nash/KPMG CIO Survey,” and it’s only going to get worse as demand for candidates with computer science degrees continues to outstrip supply. One study from Computer Science Zone, “The Technology Job Gap,” predicted that within the next 10 years, there will be 1 million more computing jobs than graduates to fill them.

Could apprenticeship programs and corporate universities be the solution to the deep end of the talent gap?

BY SARAH FISTER GALE

These days, every company is a technology company, which means demand for IT talent is never going to go away. And despite aggressive efforts to push teens toward STEM degree paths, colleges are just not graduating enough software engineers, coders and other tech talent to meet current hiring demands.

Sixty-five percent of tech leaders say the skills shortage is the highest they’ve seen in a decade, according to the 2018 “Harvey Nash/KPMG CIO Survey,” and it’s only going to get worse as demand for candidates with computer science degrees continues to outstrip supply. One study from Computer Science Zone, “The Technology Job Gap,” predicted that within the next 10 years, there will be 1 million more computing jobs than graduates to fill them.

Could apprenticeship programs and corporate universities be the solution to the deep end of the talent gap?

BY SARAH FISTER GALE

These days, every company is a technology company, which means demand for IT talent is never going to go away. And despite aggressive efforts to push teens toward STEM degree paths, colleges are just not graduating enough software engineers, coders and other tech talent to meet current hiring demands.

Sixty-five percent of tech leaders say the skills shortage is the highest they’ve seen in a decade, according to the 2018 “Harvey Nash/KPMG CIO Survey,” and it’s only going to get worse as demand for candidates with computer science degrees continues to outstrip supply. One study from Computer Science Zone, “The Technology Job Gap,” predicted that within the next 10 years, there will be 1 million more computing jobs than graduates to fill them.

Each week over breakfast, editor Mike Prokopeak and veteran CLO Justin Lombardo invite listeners in to a one-of-a-kind conversation about what’s happening in corporate education featuring in-depth interviews with learning executives, authors and industry leaders.

This behind-the-scenes look at the evolution of the CLO role spotlights how it fits in today’s ever-evolving business environment and what learning executives who aim to lead tomorrow need to be doing today.

Immersive technologies are at the forefront of fundamental learning and development transformation.

BY DANIEL FRAGA AND CHRISTOPHE MALLET

People and organizations need to continuously learn. Rather than a sequence of jobs, 21st century careers will be more like a series of developmental experiences focused on lifelong learning. And this is not some Utopian and distant future; this change is already happening, and leaders need to foster a culture of development and adaptability to keep up.

Immersive technologies, namely virtual, augmented and mixed reality, are at the forefront of this transformation. By rewriting the way people connect — with information, experiences and each other — these technologies can lead enterprise toward higher standards of performance.

VR is currently disrupting learning and development in a number of ways. It’s allowing organizations to standardize and deliver training at scale so everyone can get the same quality of training regardless of where they are or what their role. It allows companies to reduce money spent on travel or facility downtime when training large teams. It can also reduce health and safety risks for people who deal with high-risk situations, allowing them to learn through simulations and gain practical experience without danger.

Immersive technologies are at the forefront of fundamental learning and development transformation.

BY DANIEL FRAGA AND CHRISTOPHE MALLET

People and organizations need to continuously learn. Rather than a sequence of jobs, 21st century careers will be more like a series of developmental experiences focused on lifelong learning. And this is not some Utopian and distant future; this change is already happening, and leaders need to foster a culture of development and adaptability to keep up.

Immersive technologies, namely virtual, augmented and mixed reality, are at the forefront of this transformation. By rewriting the way people connect — with information, experiences and each other — these technologies can lead enterprise toward higher standards of performance.

VR is currently disrupting learning and development in a number of ways. It’s allowing organizations to standardize and deliver training at scale so everyone can get the same quality of training regardless of where they are or what their role. It allows companies to reduce money spent on travel or facility downtime when training large teams. It can also reduce health and safety risks for people who deal with high-risk situations, allowing them to learn through simulations and gain practical experience without danger.

The world is changing much faster than our ability to adapt. The disruptive forces of speed, uncertainty, complexity, technology, competition and globalization have fundamentally altered the way we live and work. Join physiologist Bob Rosen, an expert on leadership and transformation and executive coach Emma-Kate Swann as they reveal the four powerful practices of being conscious.

WHY IS AN ABILITY TO DEAL WITH ACCELERATED CHANGE SO CRITICAL RIGHT NOW?

In truth, we’ve been dealing with extreme change and complexity for years now — the world is simply changing faster than our ability to adapt, and the pace of change will only increase. That dynamic impacts us as individuals, organizations and communities. We experience more stress and burnout, and more disengagement and cynicism. We also become more resistant to change and often become overwhelmed by all types of disruption and transformation that we don’t fully understand.

Case Study


Selling Wellness

BY SARAH FISTER GALE

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eo Burnett is an iconic advertising agency known for producing such memorable characters as the Jolly Green Giant, Tony the Tiger and the Keebler Elves. But in the world of advertising you can’t rest on what you’ve done. Even after 83 years and ranking as the No. 2 ad agency in the country, according to D&B Hoovers, Leo Burnett’s leaders know the only way to stay on top is to constantly generate a stream of innovative new campaigns.

That takes strong leadership and a culture that embraces collaboration over conflict — particularly in the face of change, said Brenda Strong, executive vice president and director of agency resource optimization for Leo Burnett in Chicago.

Business Intelligence


Delivery Dilemmas

Data indicate a more complicated picture about learning delivery beyond the simple assumptions.

By Mike Prokopeak

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mong the nuggets of accepted wisdom about corporate learning, these three are near the top: Compliance training is a low value but necessary task. Classroom training is going the way of the dodo. Learners hold the power in the new learning environment.

The reality is far more complicated, according to a survey of the Chief Learning Officer Business Intelligence Board. The Business Intelligence Board is a group of 1,500 professionals in the learning and development industry who have agreed to be surveyed by the Human Capital Media Research and Advisory Group, the research and advisory arm of Chief Learning Officer magazine. This survey was conducted in June 2018.

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in conclusion


Supporting Your Firestarters

Create a culture of support for those who make a difference BY PAUL EDER

Paul Eder is a strategic management consultant and co-author of “Firestarters: How Innovators, Instigators and Initiators Can Inspire You to Ignite Your Own Life.”
He can be reached at editor@CLOmedia.com.

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n any given organization, there are doers who shine regardless of the situation. These employees, who I call firestarters, overcome obstacles that appear insurmountable and consistently achieve results. They have a seemingly endless amount of passion, talent and desire for mastery that you can only hope other employees will try to emulate.

Who are firestarters? They are the innovators who create, the instigators who disrupt and the initiators who start. They don’t fit a set pattern based on role, education or skill. However, they do share a common orientation toward aligning their actions with a personal mission and making an impact.

Thanks for reading our October 2018 issue!