September 2018

Sponsored Content


5 Steps to Getting Started With Internal Talent Development

As good talent becomes harder to find, more companies are looking to educational programs for developing their talent pools from within.

I

f the trend toward jobs requiring college degrees or credentials continues, employers will need to be more proactive than ever to develop their own talent through educational programs. Haley Glover, strategy director at Lumina Foundation, offers five suggestions for getting started:

1. Understand the educational attainment of your workforce

Make sure you have a complete understanding of the degrees and credentials your workforce currently holds. This will help you create a solid plan for filling in gaps.

Sponsored Content


Why Educate and Retain is the Answer to Your Talent Shortage

With 40% of employers reporting a talent shortage, they’re turning to education programs to retain top talent and built internal talent pipelines.

K

eeping good employees has always been more cost effective than recruiting, hiring and training new ones. But as the talent market tightens, retaining and developing employees from within is becoming imperative.

With the lowest unemployment rate in almost two decades (3.8 percent as of May 2018), it’s no wonder employers are feeling a talent crunch. As reported by the ManpowerGroup’s 2016-2017 Talent Shortage Survey, the number of global employers reporting talent shortages is 40 percent, the highest since 2007.

Editor’s Letter


Moving Forward, Looking Behind

W

e recently moved into a brand new office. It’s still that magical time of uncluttered desktops and new carpet smell before the coffee stains blossom and papers and files inevitably pile up.

While our new digs are just a short two-block hop from our old home in downtown Chicago, in some ways it is a journey of years. There’s nothing quite like a move to bring the passage of time into focus.

Shortly after I started as editorial director at Chief Learning Officer in 2007, we moved into that recently vacated office. In the ensuing time we grew from primarily a magazine publisher into a full-fledged media company with events, conferences and original research serving the largest audience in the human capital management industry.

September 2018 | Volume 17, Issue 7

CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER
John R. Taggart
jrtag@CLOmedia.com

PRESIDENT
Kevin A. Simpson
ksimpson@CLOmedia.com

Vice President, GROUP PUBLISHER
Clifford Capone
ccapone@CLOmedia.com

VICE PRESIDENT, EDITOR IN CHIEF
Mike Prokopeak
mikep@CLOmedia.com

Editorial Director
Rick Bell
rbell@CLOmedia.com

Managing Editor
Ashley St. John
astjohn@CLOmedia.com

ASSISTANT MANAGING EDITOR
Christopher Magnus
cmagnus@CLOmedia.com

SENIOR EDITOR
Lauren Dixon
ldixon@CLOmedia.com

ASSOCIATE EDITORS
Andie Burjek
aburjek@CLOmedia.com

Ave Rio
ario@CLOmedia.com

editorial art director
Theresa Stoodley
tstoodley@CLOmedia.com

Video and Multimedia Producer
Andrew Kennedy Lewis
alewis@CLOmedia.com

Editorial Associates
Aysha Ashley Househ
ahouseh@CLOmedia.com

Rocio Villaseñor
rvillasenor@CLOmedia.com

Vice President, RESEARCH & Advisory Services
Sarah Kimmel
skimmel@CLOmedia.com

RESEARCH MANAGER
Tim Harnett
tharnett@CLOmedia.com

Data Scientist
Grey Litaker
glitaker@CLOmedia.com

Media & Production Manager
Ashley Flora
aflora@CLOmedia.com

Production Coordinator
Nina Howard
nhoward@CLOmedia.com

VICE PRESIDENT, EVENTS
Trey Smith
tsmith@CLOmedia.com

Events Content Editor
Malaz Elsheikh
melsheikh@CLOmedia.com

Webcast Manager
Alec O’Dell
aodell@CLOmedia.com

Events Graphic Designer
Tonya Harris
lharris@CLOmedia.com

BUSINESS MANAGER
Vince Czarnowski
vince@CLOmedia.com

Marketing Director
Greg Miller
gmiller@CLOmedia.com

Marketing Specialist
Kristen Britt
kbritt@CLOmedia.com

Regional Sales ManagerS
Derek Graham
dgraham@CLOmedia.com

Robert Stevens
rstevens@CLOmedia.com

Daniella Weinberg
dweinberg@CLOmedia.com

Director, Business Development 
Kevin Fields
kfields@CLOmedia.com

Audience Development Director
Cindy Cardinal
ccardinal@CLOmedia.com

Digital & Audience Insights Manager
Lauren Lynch
llynch@CLOmedia.com

Audience Insights Coordinator
Micaela Martinez
mmartinez@CLOmedia.com

LIST MANAGER
Mike Rovello
hcmlistrentals@infogroup.com

Business Administration Manager
Melanie Lee
mlee@CLOmedia.com

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS
Nabeel Ahmad
Ken Blanchard
Agatha Bordonaro
John Burge
Bob Danna
Sarah Fister Gale
Sherrie Haynie
Laci Loew
Elliott Masie
Lee Maxey
Bob Mosher
Dan Pontefract
Cynthia St. John

CHIEF LEARNING OFFICER EDITORIAL ADVISORY BOARD

Cedric Coco, EVP, Chief People Officer, Brookdale Senior Living Inc.
Lisa Doyle, Head of Retail Training, Ace Hardware
Dave DeFilippo, Chief People and Learning Officer, Suffolk
Tamar Elkeles, Chief Talent Executive, Atlantic Bridge Capital
Thomas Evans, (Ret.) Chief Learning Officer, PricewaterhouseCoopers
Gerry Hudson-Martin, Director, Corporate Learning Strategies, Business Architects
Kimo Kippen, President, Aloha Learning Advisors
Rob Lauber, Vice President, Chief Learning Officer, McDonald’s Corp.
Maj. Gen. Erwin F. Lessel, (Ret.) U.S. Air Force, Director, Deloitte Consulting
Justin Lombardo, (Ret.) Chief Learning Officer, Baptist Health
Adri Maisonet-Morales, Vice President, Enterprise Learning and Development, Blue Cross Blue Shield of North Carolina
Alan Malinchak, CEO, Éclat Transitions LLC
Lee Maxey, CEO, MindMax
Bob Mosher, Senior Partner and Chief Learning Evangelist, APPLY Synergies
Rebecca Ray, Executive Vice President, The Conference Board
Allison Rossett, (Ret.) Professor of Educational Technology, San Diego State University
Diana Thomas, CEO and Founder, Winning Results
David Vance, Executive Director, Center for Talent Reporting
Kevin D. Wilde, Executive Leadership Fellow, Carlson School of Management, University of Minnesota
James P. Woolsey, President, Defense Aquisition University

Chief Learning Officer (ISSN 1935-8148) is published monthly, except bi-monthly in January/February and July/August by MediaTec Publishing Inc., 150 N. Michigan Ave., Suite 550, Chicago IL 60601.  Periodicals postage paid at Chicago, IL and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Chief Learning Officer, P.O. Box 8712 Lowell, MA 01853. Subscriptions are free to qualified professionals within the US and Canada. Digital free subscriptions are available worldwide. Nonqualified paid subscriptions are available at the subscription price of $199 for 10 issues.  All countries outside the US and Canada must be prepaid in US funds with an additional $33 postage surcharge.  Single price copy is $29.99.

Chief Learning Officer and CLOmedia.com are the trademarks of MediaTec Publishing Inc. Copyright © 2018, MediaTec Publishing Inc. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Reproduction of material published in Chief Learning Officer is forbidden without permission.

Printed by: Quad/Graphics, Sussex, WI

on the cover: Photo by Daniel Berman

22


Profile

Agatha Bordonaro
At Nordstrom, Jesse Schlueter is using her strong operational background to help the 115-year-old institution evolve and grow.

52


Case Study

Sarah Fister Gale
Tyson Foods invests in ESL and GED courses for frontline workers through its Upward Academy.

54


Business Intelligence

Mike Prokopeak
Spending plans for 2019 indicate CLOs remain optimistic.

Features

18
Sherrie Haynie
The most effective learning strategy considers personality, allowing a diversity of employees to engage in various ways.
32
John Burge, Bob Danna and Laci Loew
What is the missing link between content, insight and wisdom curation, and critical thinking?
38
Nabeel Ahmad
We can leverage neuroscience insights to build trusted business relationships.
42
Cynthia St. John
Consider a single-model approach to developing effective, successful leaders and organizations.
48
Ave Rio
Helping leaders identify and manage their “dark side” traits can actually produce positive results.

Experts

10
Elliott Masie
Justify the Learning Ritual
12
Bob Mosher
Context Beats Content
14
Ken Blanchard
Courage Is Vulnerability — and Learnable
16
Lee Maxey
Higher Education: Late to Online Learning
58
Dan Pontefract
Slow Down to Think More Creatively

Resources

4
Moving Forward, Looking Behind

Are you a part of the CLO Network?

imperatives


Justify the Learning Ritual

Be ready to answer questions about your L&D practices By Elliott Masie

Elliott Masie is CEO of The Masie Center, an international think tank focused on learning and workplace productivity, and chairman and CLO of The Masie Center’s Learning Consortium.
He can be reached at editor@CLOmedia.com.

C

LOs — be prepared! You and your team may be asked to justify some of your most familiar rituals with evidence and business data. Business leaders and even boards of directors are looking for radical shifts in approaches and processes — and learning and training are ripe targets to be examined.

Here are a few learning ritual challenges from my conversations with senior executives in the past year, as well as considerations for responding should you be presented with similar challenges in your organization.

Does leadership training actually create and keep better leaders — with better business results?

If you are presented with this question, be prepared to examine the concrete skills, competencies and readiness levels that your leadership programs yield. Examine the six-month, one-year and three-year patterns of graduates of your leadership academies.

selling up, selling down


Context Beats Content

In workflow learning, shifting to a context-first mindset is key By Bob Mosher

Bob Mosher is a senior partner and chief learning evangelist for APPLY Synergies, a strategic consulting firm.
He can be reached at editor@CLOmedia.com.

P

ersonalized learning, workflow learning, the Five Moments of Need, 70-20-10, informal learning — call it what you want, but moving learning away from events and into everyday work is one of the hottest topics in our industry right now. I speak with at least three to five learning leaders a week who are struggling with making the “transformation” (another hot topic) from a training department/university model to a performance-centric/workflow-oriented design shop.

The journey is not an easy one. There’s a lot of history and, frankly, baggage to get past. When you’ve been designing for training first, shifting that focus is hard, but until we do, the transformation we want just isn’t going to happen.

leadership


Courage Is Vulnerability — and Learnable

Vulnerability is a key leadership trait By ken blanchard

Ken Blanchard is chief spiritual officer of The Ken Blanchard Cos. and co-author of “Servant Leadership in Action.”
He can be reached at editor@CLOmedia.com.

I

f you’ve seen Brené Brown’s TED talk — and with more than 34 million views, you probably have — you know the research professor and corporate trainer makes a strong case for the power of vulnerability. In a recent podcast, Brown discussed the connection between vulnerability and a key leadership trait: courage.

Based on everything I’ve learned over a half century of working with people and organizations, I agree with what Brown said in that podcast: Leading takes courage — and courage requires vulnerability.

At first the two appear to be opposites. Isn’t courage all about being tough and invulnerable? Not at all. An act of courage — starting a new product line in your business, for example — entails risk, uncertainty and emotional exposure. There’s no guarantee your idea will succeed and you risk the uncomfortable emotions that accompany failure.

MAKING THE GRADE


Higher Education: Late to Online Learning

For CLOs, that’s a good thing BY LEE MAXEY

Lee Maxey is CEO of MindMax, a marketing and enrollment management services company.
He can be reached at editor@CLOmedia.com.

I

n his book “Thank You for Being Late,” Thomas Friedman analyzes why the world seems to be accelerating away from us at a remarkable pace. His explanation: Humans are adaptable, but no generation has experienced technology, globalization and climate change at the rate we are seeing. As an example, Friedman suggests that if advances in microchips had instead occurred in cars, today’s successor to the 1970s Volkswagen “Bug” would cost 4 cents and have a top speed of 300,000 miles per hour.

The book’s title comes from a remark Friedman shared with a friend who was late arriving for their scheduled meeting. The extra few minutes gave the author time to actually think before diving into yet another in a string of meetings. Sometimes being late is a good thing.

The most effective learning strategy considers personality, allowing a variety of employees to engage in a variety of ways.

BY SHERRIE HAYNIE

By the early 2000s, human resources developed a reputation in some circles as being a bit of a stick-in-the-mud, no-fun-allowed department, its trainings a necessary distraction from “real work.” This image of corporate training was popularized by characters like Toby the HR guy on the sitcom “The Office,” who constantly foiled the well-intentioned but often legally and morally dubious shenanigans of management.

How true this image of training is probably varies from company to company, but many HR departments are taking steps to deliberately depart from it. Learning tools and strategies are increasingly focused on what can be done to make work more enjoyable and engaging. As Josh Bersin, founder of Bersin by Deloitte, pointed out in his Forbes article, “The HR Software Market Reinvents Itself,” HR software has experienced a renaissance during the past few years. As a result, HR and learning and development departments have more training options than ever before and the chance to do something important: make learning relevant.

However, rapid evolution in the way companies deliver training (and even changes in the content and availability of those trainings) can leave some employees who liked the old way of doing things feeling left out in the cold. This may be more than simple resistance to change — it might actually be linked to personality.

The most effective learning strategy considers personality, allowing a variety of employees to engage in a variety of ways.

BY SHERRIE HAYNIE

By the early 2000s, human resources developed a reputation in some circles as being a bit of a stick-in-the-mud, no-fun-allowed department, its trainings a necessary distraction from “real work.” This image of corporate training was popularized by characters like Toby the HR guy on the sitcom “The Office,” who constantly foiled the well-intentioned but often legally and morally dubious shenanigans of management.

How true this image of training is probably varies from company to company, but many HR departments are taking steps to deliberately depart from it. Learning tools and strategies are increasingly focused on what can be done to make work more enjoyable and engaging. As Josh Bersin, founder of Bersin by Deloitte, pointed out in his Forbes article, “The HR Software Market Reinvents Itself,” HR software has experienced a renaissance during the past few years. As a result, HR and learning and development departments have more training options than ever before and the chance to do something important: make learning relevant.

However, rapid evolution in the way companies deliver training (and even changes in the content and availability of those trainings) can leave some employees who liked the old way of doing things feeling left out in the cold. This may be more than simple resistance to change — it might actually be linked to personality.

Profile


The Business of Development

At Nordstrom, Jesse Schlueter is using her strong operational background to help the century-old company evolve and grow.

BY AGATHA BORDONARO

How does someone who went to college to become a high school math teacher end up leading learning at Nordstrom?

The answer is simple: She loves finding solutions.

Jesse Schlueter, vice president of learning and leadership for Nordstrom, leverages her passion for numbers in her role managing the development of the retail giant’s 72,000 employees. With a bachelor’s degree in sociology and statistics, a master’s in organizational psychology and a work history rooted in operational development, Schlueter is able to take a decidedly business-first approach to L&D.

10 Design Thinking Tools

By Jeanne Liedtka, United Technologies Corporation Professor of Business Administration

Jeanne Liedtka is a faculty member at the University of Virginia’s Darden School of Business and former chief learning officer at United Technologies Corporation, where she was responsible for overseeing all activities associated with corporate learning and development for the Fortune 50 corporation. At Darden, Jeanne focuses in the areas of design thinking, innovation and leading growth. Her passion is exploring how organizations can engage employees at every level in thinking creatively about the design of powerful futures.

Visualization

Visualization is not about drawing; it’s about visual thinking. It pushes us beyond using words alone. It is a way of unlocking a different part of our brains that allows us to think nonverbally and that managers might not normally use.

When you explain an idea using words, the rest of us will form our own mental pictures. If instead you present your idea to us visually, you reduce the possibility of unmatched mental models.

A Learning Opportunity

Why today’s economy favors an evolving role for L&D

By Adina Sapp

The talent market is the tightest it has been for many years, with record low unemployment. This is leading CEOs to focus even more acutely on attracting, retaining, developing and promoting talent. Adding fuel to the fire is the strong economy along with the windfall for businesses provided by the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act. This provides opportunities for learning and development (L&D) leaders to take advantage of a willingness to invest and respond to this new reality. And while some organizations are using extra cash for one-time bonuses and pay increases, Patrick Donovan, senior vice president of education advisory services at EdAssist (a division of Bright Horizons), argues for a different approach.

Planning for an Ever-Changing Future

How L&D and Succession Planning Work in Tandem

By Adina Sapp

Traditionally, succession planning has been a lengthy process: identifying top talent early, grooming candidates for promotion and then moving employees through jobs to prepare them for future opportunities over many years. Today’s workers, however, may be unlikely to remain with a company long enough for a slow-paced succession plan to succeed. According to a 2018 Deloitte study, “Among millennials, 43 percent expect to leave their jobs within two years if given the choice; only 28 percent expect to stay beyond five years if given the choice. Employed Gen Z respondents express even less loyalty, with 61 percent saying they would leave within two years if given the choice.”¹

By John Burge, Bob Danna and Laci Loew

Content curation is not a new phenomenon. For decades, employees have attempted to collect and sort information, and management has sought to derive associated quantitative business value — largely to no avail. The challenge has always been how to separate the signal from the noise or, in other words, the actionable 2 percent from the rest.

But how do you meet that challenge? Insight curation may be the answer.

Overlooked Aspects of Insights

Insights have been referred to as the new currency of business, and today’s economy is often referred to as the insight economy. Consultancies and think tanks have made it clear: To compete today, companies must rely on critical-thinking experts sharing insights.

In fact, insight-driven organizations are growing at an average of more than 30 percent annually and are on track to earn $1.8 trillion by 2021, according to “Insights-Driven Businesses Set the Pace for Global Growth,” a 2017 report by Forrester Research Inc. As such, we must implement and operate networks of insights. Big data and business intelligence are not enough. The path to action lies in insights, and insights come from human expertise.

By John Burge, Bob Danna and Laci Loew

Content curation is not a new phenomenon. For decades, employees have attempted to collect and sort information, and management has sought to derive associated quantitative business value — largely to no avail. The challenge has always been how to separate the signal from the noise or, in other words, the actionable 2 percent from the rest.

But how do you meet that challenge? Insight curation may be the answer.

Overlooked Aspects of Insights

Insights have been referred to as the new currency of business, and today’s economy is often referred to as the insight economy. Consultancies and think tanks have made it clear: To compete today, companies must rely on critical-thinking experts sharing insights.

In fact, insight-driven organizations are growing at an average of more than 30 percent annually and are on track to earn $1.8 trillion by 2021, according to “Insights-Driven Businesses Set the Pace for Global Growth,” a 2017 report by Forrester Research Inc. As such, we must implement and operate networks of insights. Big data and business intelligence are not enough. The path to action lies in insights, and insights come from human expertise.

We can leverage neuroscience insights to build trusted business relationships.

BY NABEEL AHMAD

“Last year, when I was working the phones, a woman called, trying to return some boots. The sad story turned out to be that she had bought them for her father, who had since died. I told her not to bother returning them; that we would refund her money and she was free to give the boots away instead of returning them. And after the call I felt moved to send her some flowers — just one of the 380 gifts of flowers you can see on the board that we sent out last year. Sometime after that, she sent me a letter and a photo of her father.”

This story was told by a Zappos employee and quoted in a June 2017 Forbes article, “Tony Hsieh Reveals the Secret to Zappos’ Customer Service Success in One Word.” But its lesson isn’t about flowers. It’s about the phone.

Zappos encourages phone calls 24/7. It enables in-depth conversations with customers. This creates social connection to build lifelong customers. “It’s how we build a personal connection, primarily on the phone,” Tony Hsieh, Zappos CEO, said in the Forbes article. And the conversations customers have with Zappos phone workers aren’t just about products. They are about “whatever friends would talk about,” according to Hsieh.

Can we be sure that what Zappos does actually helps form deeper connections with customers? Fortunately, we can now — using neuroscience. For years, “soft” sciences such as psychology have assessed human relationship behavior. Now, new technology enables “hard” science to provide more evidence into how our brains work. And we can leverage that insight to build trusted business relationships, both internally and externally.

The Relationships Business

Soft skills, such as communication and negotiation, form the core of relationship building in business and can help develop deep and trusted relationships with clients, engaging on a human level.

Last year at KPMG, we endeavored to discover whether we could leverage evidence-based research from neuroscience to better inform how best to develop trusted relationships with our clients. Granted, that goal may be achieved differently by different individuals. Yet we wondered if hard science might uncover any universal insights to better inform our practice. If so, we could then use such findings to update our client-engagement methodology in coaching our people working with clients. What we ended up doing was a bit different.

We can leverage neuroscience insights to build trusted business relationships.

BY NABEEL AHMAD

“Last year, when I was working the phones, a woman called, trying to return some boots. The sad story turned out to be that she had bought them for her father, who had since died. I told her not to bother returning them; that we would refund her money and she was free to give the boots away instead of returning them. And after the call I felt moved to send her some flowers — just one of the 380 gifts of flowers you can see on the board that we sent out last year. Sometime after that, she sent me a letter and a photo of her father.”

This story was told by a Zappos employee and quoted in a June 2017 Forbes article, “Tony Hsieh Reveals the Secret to Zappos’ Customer Service Success in One Word.” But its lesson isn’t about flowers. It’s about the phone.

Zappos encourages phone calls 24/7. It enables in-depth conversations with customers. This creates social connection to build lifelong customers. “It’s how we build a personal connection, primarily on the phone,” Tony Hsieh, Zappos CEO, said in the Forbes article. And the conversations customers have with Zappos phone workers aren’t just about products. They are about “whatever friends would talk about,” according to Hsieh.

Can we be sure that what Zappos does actually helps form deeper connections with customers? Fortunately, we can now — using neuroscience. For years, “soft” sciences such as psychology have assessed human relationship behavior. Now, new technology enables “hard” science to provide more evidence into how our brains work. And we can leverage that insight to build trusted business relationships, both internally and externally.

A single-model approach to developing effective, successful leaders and organizations.

By Cynthia St. John

Countless valuable works contribute to our understanding of leadership and organizational effectiveness. There are well in excess of 100,000 books on leadership alone. Factor in those on organization development and change, and your reading list expands exponentially. This raises some questions for learning leaders: Is it possible to synthesize and simplify the myriad leadership models into a single, understandable leadership system? If such a system is possible, how can one use it to consistently develop effective leaders and organizations?

Rather than create yet another nuanced approach, what if we could integrate the two huge and historically distinct fields, distill them to the most essential elements, and use those elements to offer one overarching framework for leadership and organizational excellence? In short, how might we simplify success and make it systematically achievable?

Achieving simplicity by recognizing and extracting only what’s essential requires starting with a broad view. Figure 1 is a parsimonious look at more than 100 years of theory for the two disciplines. From here, we can focus on understanding the essential elements and build a solid, simple framework for leader and organization success.

A single-model approach to developing effective, successful leaders and organizations.

By Cynthia St. John

Countless valuable works contribute to our understanding of leadership and organizational effectiveness. There are well in excess of 100,000 books on leadership alone. Factor in those on organization development and change, and your reading list expands exponentially. This raises some questions for learning leaders: Is it possible to synthesize and simplify the myriad leadership models into a single, understandable leadership system? If such a system is possible, how can one use it to consistently develop effective leaders and organizations?

Rather than create yet another nuanced approach, what if we could integrate the two huge and historically distinct fields, distill them to the most essential elements, and use those elements to offer one overarching framework for leadership and organizational excellence? In short, how might we simplify success and make it systematically achievable?

Achieving simplicity by recognizing and extracting only what’s essential requires starting with a broad view. Figure 1 is a parsimonious look at more than 100 years of theory for the two disciplines. From here, we can focus on understanding the essential elements and build a solid, simple framework for leader and organization success.

REGISTER TO ATTEND
THE EVENT & MEET THE WINNERS.
CLOSYMPOSIUM.COM

Announcing the Learning in Practice Award winners at the CLO Symposium Fall 2018. Now in its 16th year, the Learning in Practice Awards recognize industry leaders who have demonstrated excellence in the design and delivery of employee development programs. Here are the finalists:

Alanna Corrigan
Senior Director of Customer Service
Training Design & Transformation
Air Canada

Anil Santhapuri
Director of Learning and Development
Altisource

Blaire Bhojwani
Senior Director, Learning Innovation
Hilton

Brenda Sugrue
Global Chief Learning Officer
EY

Brent Boeckman
Global Learning and Development
Manager
Malwarebytes

Charles Atkins
Vice President
Dell EMC Education Services

Chris Bower
Global Director of GM Center of Learning
General Motors

Chris Hall
Assistant Commissioner
U.S. Department of Homeland Security
U.S. Customs and Border Protection

Damodar Padhi
Vice President and Global Head
of Talent Development
Tata Consultancy Services

David Sylvester
Principal of Leadership & Development
Booz Allen Hamilton

Edward Bell
Director
Dell EMC Education Services

Elizabeth Collins-Calder
Director of Leadership Development
Suffolk

Elizabeth MacGillivray
Strategic Learning Leader
Mercer

Helen Rossiter
Senior Talent Development Specialist
West Marine

James Mitchell
Vice President of Global Talent
Management
Rackspace

Jim Whiteford
Executive Director
Ally

Joe Ilvento
Chief Learning Officer
Commvault

John Kusi-Mensah, AVP
Distribution Capability Center of Expertise
MetLife

Judith Almendra
Vice President of Human Capital
TTEC

Kathleen McCutcheon
Vice President of Human Resources
Tokio Marine HCC

Laurie Jeppesen
Global Assurance Learning & Education
Leader
PwC

Lisa Druet
Senior Manager, E. & J.
Gallo Winery

Mariam Kakkar
Chief of Talent Development Unit
United Nations Development Programme

Meredith Oakes
Global Head of Campus Strategy
& Pipeline Development
BNY Mellon

Meriya Dyble
Director of Learning Reimagined
ATB Financial

Mike Blanchette
Senior Director of Sales Acceleration
Veeam

Nancy Robert
Executive Vice President of Chief Product
and Marketing Officer
American Nurses Association

Natasa Prodanovic
Group Talent Director
Coca-Cola HBC AG

Parimal Rathod
Senior Vice President & Head of
Business Impact Group and Learning
& Development
Kotak Mahindra Life Insurance Company
Limited

Patricia Aquaro
Managing Director and Head of Risk and
Professional Excellence
BNY Mellon

Paul Lutmer
Global Commercial Learning Leader
GE Corporate

Ross McLean
Global Program Manager
Veeam

Scott Hammond
Senior Manager of Industry Programs
Autodesk

Tim Tobin
Vice President of Franchisee Onboarding
and Learning
Choice Hotels International

Walter Davis
Global Learning Systems & Delivery
Manager
Aggreko

Companies

Alamo Colleges
Bank of New York Mellon
C3
CoreAxis Consulting, LLC
D2L
Davenport University
Dell EMC

E. & J. Gallo Winery
Easygenerator
General Motors
GP Strategies
HT2 Labs
Impact
Learnlight

Litmos
NovoEd
Paychex
Penn State Smeal College of
Business/ Penn State Executive Programs Raytheon
Professional Services LLC

Rite Solutions
Scrimmage
Sidley Austin LLP
STRIVR
SweetRush
The Presentation Company
The Regis Company
TTEC

Everyone has a “dark side.” Helping leaders know and manage their less desirable traits can produce positive results.

By Ave Rio

In 1992, Robert Hogan identified 11 dark side characteristics, including being bold, mischievous, leisurely, colorful and reserved (Figure 1). According to research conducted in the 1980s by organizational psychologists, one reason that otherwise successful and talented leaders fail is because of the prevalence of their dark side characteristics. However, new research by Hogan’s eponymous personality assessment company found that these characteristics can be recognized and even leveraged in the workplace.

Hogan Assessments CEO Scott Gregory calls the set of 11 personality characteristics “dark side derailers.” These characteristics, according to the research, can get managers in trouble by impeding their ability to build and sustain teams, engage people, communicate effectively and manage performance.

Everyone has a “dark side.” Helping leaders know and manage their less desirable traits can produce positive results.

By Ave Rio

In 1992, Robert Hogan identified 11 dark side characteristics, including being bold, mischievous, leisurely, colorful and reserved (Figure 1). According to research conducted in the 1980s by organizational psychologists, one reason that otherwise successful and talented leaders fail is because of the prevalence of their dark side characteristics. However, new research by Hogan’s eponymous personality assessment company found that these characteristics can be recognized and even leveraged in the workplace.

Hogan Assessments CEO Scott Gregory calls the set of 11 personality characteristics “dark side derailers.” These characteristics, according to the research, can get managers in trouble by impeding their ability to build and sustain teams, engage people, communicate effectively and manage performance.

Case Study


Moving on Up(ward)

BY SARAH FISTER GALE

T

yson Foods got its beginnings during the Great Depression when founder John Tyson began delivering chickens from Springdale, Arkansas, to buyers across the Midwest. Nearly 90 years later, Tyson has become the second largest processor of chicken, beef and pork in the world, with more than 100,000 employees across the country and nearly $40 billion in annual revenues — but it still operates that first plant in Springdale, and it’s still deeply invested in the local community and its people.

Springdale has a significant immigrant population who came to Arkansas in search of a better life, and the company wanted to be sure it was meeting their needs. In 2015, Tyson conducted an employee satisfaction survey of frontline plant workers at Springdale and discovered that many of them were interested in English language learning programs.

Business Intelligence


A Budget Bonanza

Spending plans for 2019 indicate that CLOs remain optimistic as they enter budget season.

By Mike Prokopeak

W

hen trying to get to the bottom of something, it’s always a good idea to follow the money. Talk is cheap but cash speaks volumes. And if learning investment plans are any indicator, learning executives are feeling pretty good about the future.

Investment plans for 2019 show learning executives are confident entering budget planning season. According to a survey of the Chief Learning Officer Business Intelligence Board, a solid majority (65 percent) say their outlook for next year is more optimistic than last year and a quarter (25.5 percent) report feeling about the same as they did last year (Figure 1).

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Group Publisher

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Director, Business Development 
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Business Administration Manager
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in conclusion


Slow Down to Think More Creatively

Mental overload squelches creative thinking BY DAN PONTEFRACT

Dan Pontefract is chief envisioner of Telus and author of “Open to Think: Slow Down, Think Creatively, and Make Better Decisions.” He can be reached at editor@CLOmedia.com.

W

hen we were babies, every day was an opportunity for exploration. The journey seemed endless. First, we explored our crib. Then we graduated and began to circumnavigate the floor. Eventually, we discovered that kitchen drawers were full of items to examine with our hands and mouths. As we started to walk there was more to explore: the velvety sand at the beach, the soft grass in the park, the glistening snow in a field. It was endless exploration. We were constantly learning.

We did so because we had the luxury of time. Aside from a schedule of naps and snacks, no one was telling us to complete a task by day’s end. No superiors were badgering us to “do more with less.” Every minute was not accounted for by overtaxing schedules, inane meetings or rushed deadlines. Social media was as foreign to us as those objects we popped into our mouths. We were free to think creatively and were unafraid to do so.

Thanks for reading our September 2018 issue!