Chief Learning Officer
September 2019

Editor’s Letter


Memes Matter
Mike Prokopeak Editor in Chief
W

hat do Rickrolling, Grumpy Cat, dabbing and Distracted Boyfriend have to do with learning? Quite a lot actually.

The silly, meaningless and fun little pictures and animations that zip around the internet are actually the building blocks of culture. Internet memes — from dancing babies to planking to LOLcats — are how we now learn at light speed.

Whether you find them amusing or irritating is beside the point. As a learning executive you need to think about how to use them.

The internet has given us the fastest, most powerful tool in history to collect, catalogue and share information. And what moves most swiftly across the internet highway? Here’s a hint. It’s not the 10,000-word thinkpiece, 1,000-page how-to manual or 10-page explainer or even the one-page job aid. For good or for bad, it’s internet memes.

SEPTEMBER 2019 | Volume 18, Issue 7

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CLO Contents June 2019
Pamay Bassey
Pamay Bassey
on the cover: Photo by Jeff Millies

10


Christyl Murray of JPMorgan Chase shares her career experiences; Blue Cross Blue Shield’s Adri Maisonet-Morales says the face of corporate learning has changed drastically; and people share what they’re reading these days.
38


Profile

Elizabeth Loutfi
Kraft Heinz CLO Pamay Bassey is reimagining corporate learning.

56


Case Study

Sarah Fister Gale
UG2’s innovation training lab aims solve the O&M talent gap.

58


Business Intelligence

Ashley St. John
When it comes to learning budgets, the future looks bright.

CLO Contents June 2019
So You Want to Measure Impact. Now What?
So You Want to Measure Impact. Now What?
The 50:50 Learning Model
D&I Done Right
5A Learning for the Digital Age
D&I Done Right
5A Learning for the Digital Age

Feature

22
Videhi Bhamidi and Kasper Spiro
Is the 70:20:10 model relevant to tech startup firms?
44
Bonnie Beresford
Measuring impact must begin with alignment.
48
Nivedita Kuruvilla and Damodar Padhi
TCS’ 5A learning model strives to take learning where the learner is, transforming it from “push” to “pull.”
52
Elizabeth Loutfi
When it comes to embracing D&I in the workplace, addressing unconscious bias is only the first step.

Experts

14
Elliott Masie
Learning in China: Scalable, AI and Shifts
16
Bob Mosher
Instructor-Led Training 2.0
18
Ken Blanchard
Reflections on Leadership
20
Lee Maxey
Higher Ed’s Changing Face
62
John Baldoni
Leading With Grace to Fulfill Your Purpose

Resources

Your Career


Your Career


Career Advice From

Christyl Murray

VP Academy Lead at JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Christyl Murray, VP Academy lead at JPMorgan Chase & Co., shares her most valuable tips and experiences she has collected throughout her career.
Career Advice from Kathleen Gallo
Christyl MurrayHow did you start your career in learning?

I grew up in the management consulting industry, working for strategy management consulting firms after undergrad and then continuing after obtaining my MBA from Wharton. As a consultant you are a professional problem solver, but you are also a strategic communicator, a facilitator of solutions delivery and a conduit for transfer of knowledge. As a senior manager, I delivered learning sessions to new consultants, such as strategy 101 and communications effectiveness. However, my first formal foray into learning was initiated when I was asked in as a subject matter expert to deliver a Foundations of Human Resources class for master’s students at New York University.

Small Bites - Christyl Murray answers our rapid-fire questions
The most important part of learning is:
The transfer of knowledge that allows you to apply learning back to your work, and the support of a “learning culture” that encourages ongoing learning and the sharing and application of new knowledge and skills.
The most important part of learning
Learning is essential to an organization because:
The pace of change and technological advancement is swift. Organizations must innovate and adapt and this is only facilitated by having top talent that is nimble and educated.
Your Career


Your Career


What Are You Reading?
The Better Angels of Our Nature: Why Violence Has Declined By Steven Pinker
The Better Angels of Our Nature: Why Violence Has Declined
By Steven Pinker
[It] takes a panoramic view of the reduction of violence in all human activities from the quotidian such as child and domestic abuse to workplace mores, judicial punishment to global warfare. Most of the world has experienced at least some of this lessening of brutality, but his focus is the West. It would at first appear a Panglossian endeavor, but he backs it up with an astonishing amount of research. Unsurprisingly, there are a number of cautions in terms of future trends and of course statistical outliers are never infinitely impossible.
Your Career


Your Career


Top of Mind
Learning in the Flow of Work By Adri Maisonet-Morales
Adri Maisonet-Morales, VP for enterprise learning and development at Blue Cross Blue Shield of North Carolina, notes how the face of corporate learning has changed drastically.

First coined by industry analyst and Bersin by Deloitte founder Josh Bersin, the term “learning in the flow of work” is taking shape as arguably the most disruptive change that learning and development has ever experienced. We have all to some degree seen it in action, and to a larger extent, are living it in our personal lives. The question is: What does this mean for corporate L&D? Simply put, we have an exciting opportunity to change the very nature of our role in corporate learning.

Adri Maisonet-Morales
Adri Maisonet-Morales

imperatives


Learning in China: Scalable, AI and Shifts
The U.S. and China can learn from each other By Elliott Masie
Elliott Masie

Elliott Masie is CEO of The Masie Center, an international think tank focused on learning and workplace productivity, and chairman and CLO of The Masie Center’s Learning Consortium.
He can be reached at editor@CLOmedia.com.

I

recently had the powerful opportunity to meet with 3,000 learning professionals in Suzhou, China. They were gathered for a conference on the role of the “internet of things” and workplace learning. After my keynote, I spent two days as a learner, journalist and colleague, probing for the learning trends and innovations in the rapidly changing country of China. Here are a few of my notes and perspectives:

It’s all about scale: One colleague was charged with growing the number of audiologists in China by 280,000 in the next few years. Scale of that nature requires a very different approach — beyond traditional campuses or curriculum. The ability to scale a learning program to tens of thousands or even millions of employees shapes the focus on the educational methods and technologies being developed in China.

Everyday learning: While we have all talked about lifelong learning, I heard buzz in China about “everyday learning,” where the learner is given a small task, assessment, challenge or content cluster each and every day. One company is building everyday learning into their timeclock system, bundling the process of logging into work with a five-minute learning activity.

selling up, selling down


Instructor-Led Training 2.0
It’s time to take a hard look at the existing ILT model BY BOB MOSHER
Chief Learning Officer author, Bob Mosher headshot.
Bob Mosher is a senior partner and chief learning evangelist for APPLY Synergies, a strategic consulting firm. He can be reached at editor@CLOmedia.com.
T

here’s never been a better time to offer instructor-led classroom training!

Yep, it’s really me, the person who was once called “The Classroom Hater Guy.”

I’ve attempted to clear up that misunderstanding many times. The classroom is actually one of my favorite delivery mediums available to those we serve. My issue has never been with the modality; it’s been with what it’s become — in many instances, a dumping ground for everything needing to be “learned” in way too short of a time and, because of this, in a format that’s instructionally broken.

Well, that might be where the Hater Guy nickname came from. With all that said, let me try and clarify my position: It’s time to take a hard look at the existing ILT model and introduce ILT 2.0.

LEADERSHIP


Reflections on Leadership
What’s changed, what’s endured, what lies ahead BY KEN BLANCHARD
Chief Learning Officer author, Ken Blanchard's headshot.
Ken Blanchard is chief spiritual officer of The Ken Blanchard Cos. and co-author of “Servant Leadership in Action.” He can be reached at editor@CLOmedia.com.
I

’m excited to celebrate two important milestones in my life this year: the 40th anniversary of The Ken Blanchard Cos. and my 80th birthday. This seems like a good time for me to reflect on what has changed in our industry and what has endured, how we’ve managed to stay resilient as a company, and what lies ahead.

First, what has changed?

The biggest change in leadership I see today compared to 40 years ago is the marked increase in servant leadership advocates and practitioners around the world. Top-down leadership is slowly but surely becoming a thing of the past. Today’s leaders have found that when they work alongside their people, they not only build great relationships but also get great results for their organization. To me, a culture that serves both internal and external customers is essential for companies everywhere today — period.

Making the grade


Higher Ed’s Changing Face

Beyond the college-age learner BY LEE MAXEY

Lee Maxey, CEO of MindMax

Lee Maxey is CEO of MindMax, a marketing and enrollment management services company.
He can be reached at editor@CLOmedia.com.

A

ccording to the National Center for Education Statistics, in 1970, 2.57 million 18- to 19-year-old students were enrolled in degree-granting postsecondary institutions compared with 767,000 students age 35 years and older. In 2020, the NCES projects those same groups will total 4.24 million and 3.28 million, respectively. A number of things — including recessions, downsizing and the rapid development and application of technology — have served as a catalyst for people 35 and older enrolling in postsecondary study. But not every 30-something wants (or needs) to enroll in a degree program to acquire skills they need to do their job, gain a promotion or switch fields. There’s a critical opportunity for higher education to serve students beyond the stereotypical college-age learner.

Is the 70:20:10 model relevant to tech startup firms?
By Videhi Bhamidi and Kasper Spiro
Corporate L&D is a key component of any business’s overall strategy. It helps ensure employees are constantly engaged and grow along with the organization. Yet startup businesses may not have enough funds or resources available to make this learning happen for their employees.

Nonetheless, there are options to facilitate talent development within tight budgets and on small teams. According to our research, there are a variety of low-cost (or even free) and out-of-box training initiatives that startups can take advantage of and provide for their employees.

Structures in a startup are informal and agile. People, roles and responsibilities tend to change fast, and a default training program is not agile enough to keep up. Additionally, when you are in the startup phase there are not enough people to train to give you ROI on a formal course. Therefore, learning has to be ad hoc and informal.

In this context, is the 70:20:10 model (70 percent experiential learning, 20 percent social learning, 10 percent formal learning) still relevant to startup firms?

In our research conducted with participant startup entrepreneurs and consultants, we found that small businesses are invariably self-driven and social at work. They learn a lot on the job, but equally or even more from others, and hardly any from formal training. We want to make a bold hypothesis here based on our preliminary research, with no intention to undermine the power of formal training: The learning models in startup tech firms should be roughly distributed as 50 percent self-learning and 50 percent social learning.

Is the 70:20:10 model relevant to tech startup firms?
By Videhi Bhamidi and Kasper Spiro
Corporate L&D is a key component of any business’s overall strategy. It helps ensure employees are constantly engaged and grow along with the organization. Yet startup businesses may not have enough funds or resources available to make this learning happen for their employees.

Nonetheless, there are options to facilitate talent development within tight budgets and on small teams. According to our research, there are a variety of low-cost (or even free) and out-of-box training initiatives that startups can take advantage of and provide for their employees.

Structures in a startup are informal and agile. People, roles and responsibilities tend to change fast, and a default training program is not agile enough to keep up. Additionally, when you are in the startup phase there are not enough people to train to give you ROI on a formal course. Therefore, learning has to be ad hoc and informal.

In this context, is the 70:20:10 model (70 percent experiential learning, 20 percent social learning, 10 percent formal learning) still relevant to startup firms?

In our research conducted with participant startup entrepreneurs and consultants, we found that small businesses are invariably self-driven and social at work. They learn a lot on the job, but equally or even more from others, and hardly any from formal training. We want to make a bold hypothesis here based on our preliminary research, with no intention to undermine the power of formal training: The learning models in startup tech firms should be roughly distributed as 50 percent self-learning and 50 percent social learning.

Is the 70:20:10 model relevant to tech startup firms?
By Videhi Bhamidi and Kasper Spiro
Corporate L&D is a key component of any business’s overall strategy. It helps ensure employees are constantly engaged and grow along with the organization. Yet startup businesses may not have enough funds or resources available to make this learning happen for their employees.

Nonetheless, there are options to facilitate talent development within tight budgets and on small teams. According to our research, there are a variety of low-cost (or even free) and out-of-box training initiatives that startups can take advantage of and provide for their employees.

Structures in a startup are informal and agile. People, roles and responsibilities tend to change fast, and a default training program is not agile enough to keep up. Additionally, when you are in the startup phase there are not enough people to train to give you ROI on a formal course. Therefore, learning has to be ad hoc and informal.

In this context, is the 70:20:10 model (70 percent experiential learning, 20 percent social learning, 10 percent formal learning) still relevant to startup firms?

In our research conducted with participant startup entrepreneurs and consultants, we found that small businesses are invariably self-driven and social at work. They learn a lot on the job, but equally or even more from others, and hardly any from formal training. We want to make a bold hypothesis here based on our preliminary research, with no intention to undermine the power of formal training: The learning models in startup tech firms should be roughly distributed as 50 percent self-learning and 50 percent social learning.

Sponsored Content
Sponsored Content
Three Critical Factors of Business Strategy
By Jared D. Harris and Michael Lenox, Professors of Business Administration, Darden School of Business
The strategist’s challenge is to simultaneously manage three critical factors: values, opportunities and capabilities. In order to devise and execute a successful strategy, you need to analyze each of these factors to understand how your organization can create and sustain value.
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Compliance Training Cannot Succeed without an LMS.
Protect your company and reduce long-term costs with an effective LMS.
By Adina Sapp
“Compliance isn’t sexy, but it’s important,” says Michelle Sullivan, senior director of marketing at Meridian Knowledge Solutions. “Organizations in every industry must deliver some level of compliance training — whether to comply with government regulations, meet industry standards or to earn and maintain certifications and qualifications.”

Compliance is particularly important in high-consequence industries such as health care, pharmaceuticals, manufacturing and finance. These industries face a high level of regulatory requirements and the very real threat of penalties for noncompliance.

Sponsored Content
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Democratizing Leadership Development
Opening the leadership silo to greater opportunities.
By Adina Sapp
Traditional leadership development has been structured in a regulated and limited way that targets top performers. The dangers to that approach include siloed leaders and stagnant organizations resulting from performance-based restrictions and merit-based training.

Traditional programs have historically been very prescriptive. As opposed to fostering individual ownership, the traditional model encourages people to believe someone else is responsible for their development.

Sponsored Content
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Transformational Leadership: It’s Not What You Think
Don’t be fooled by the name; transformational leadership is charismatic leadership with a fancy title
By Scott Gregory
The idea of transformational leadership sounds good when taken at face value. A transformational leader is someone who instills pride, respect and trust in its followers. They inspire and motivate people beyond expectations, sparking innovation and change. And, if you look up “transformation” in the dictionary, you will see it defined as “a thorough or dramatic change in form or appearance.” So, what organization wouldn’t want to introduce some form of transformational leadership to respond to the disruption caused by the current digital revolution?
Sponsored Content
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Communication as a Growth Strategy
Why the world’s leading companies are using communication to grow their bottom line.
By Scott Weiss, CEO of Speakeasy
Study after study ranks communication among the most critical skills gaps in today’s workforce. The LinkedIn “2018 Emerging Jobs Report” calls soft skills like oral communication the biggest skills gap, while “Bridging the Soft Skills Gap,” a report from the U.S. Chamber of Commerce Center for Education and Workforce, states that finding new hires who possess these skills is becoming an increasingly challenging task for employers.

Profile


Leading With Laughter and Passion
At Kraft Heinz, Chief Learning Officer Pamay Bassey is reimagining corporate learning.
By Elizabeth Loutfi
John Ogren
E

kpedeme “Pamay” Bassey, CLO of The Kraft Heinz Co., has held many different personas, both in her career as a learning and development professional and beyond.

Born in New York, she studied Symbolic Systems with an emphasis on Artificial Intelligence at Stanford University. She later earned her master’s in computer science from Northwestern University with the goal of working toward a career in technological development.

At Northwestern, she was selected to be an Andersen Consulting Corporate fellow, which was her introduction to L&D. The program, sponsored by Andersen Consulting (now Accenture) focused on applying technology as a tool for the L&D industry. It demonstrated to Bassey how technology could be used in L&D, which ignited a passion in her for individual learning. Although she is a bit more agnostic about the way learning is delivered now — through technology, face-to-face or a blend of both — she’s remained in L&D ever since.

Symposium Preview
Symposium Preview
Leland Melvin is an engineer, educator, lifelong learner, former NASA astronaut and NFL wide receiver. He shares his stories of determination and excellence to inspire communities for lasting positive change.
Leland Melvin is an engineer, educator, lifelong learner, former NASA astronaut and NFL wide receiver. He shares his stories of determination and excellence to inspire communities for lasting positive change.
Q&A with Leland Melvin

Where did your path to becoming an NFL player begin? And how did it take a turn to journeying into space? From athlete to spaceman — how did these worlds collide/interact?

My path to the NFL began when I started getting noticed by the professional scouts when we turned a 0 – 10 University of Richmond Spiders football team into a winning and playoff bound team my Junior year in college. My senior year the Detroit Lions, Dallas Cowboys, and the Denver Broncos all sent scouts to time me to see if I had the “right stuff” for the NFL.

Measuring impact must begin with alignment.
The learning industry’s well-known four-level model of evaluation, introduced by Donald Kirkpatrick, celebrates its 60th anniversary this year, so it’s time to reflect on just how far the industry has come during that time. Industry reports, including 2016’s “The State of Learning Measurement” from Bersin by Deloitte and “Measure Up or Shut Down: The Importance of Measuring Business Impact and ROI” by Training Industry, show that learning leaders believe they are quite adept at measuring enrollments, completions, learner satisfaction and test scores. Yet, after all this time, learning organizations still struggle with determining job and business impact. Why, after 60 years of effort, are learning and development professionals still stuck? Why are people still struggling with measuring impact?

A recent survey by LEO Learning and Watershed, “The Pressure Continues to Rise: Measuring the Business Impact of Learning in 2019,” found that 96 percent of learning leaders want to measure impact, and 67 percent are feeling pressure to do so. The study asked leaders why they are not measuring the effects of learning, and results revealed that leaders struggle with competing priorities, not knowing how to start and not having access to data.

These reasons share a common root cause: a lack of confidence in the ability to measure impact. The traditional measurement framework does a good job of providing a structure, but it is time to expand the framework to enable L&D professionals to build confidence in their ability to measure impact. It is time to add a foundational element to the model: alignment.

Measure Impact
Measuring impact must begin with alignment.
The learning industry’s well-known four-level model of evaluation, introduced by Donald Kirkpatrick, celebrates its 60th anniversary this year, so it’s time to reflect on just how far the industry has come during that time. Industry reports, including 2016’s “The State of Learning Measurement” from Bersin by Deloitte and “Measure Up or Shut Down: The Importance of Measuring Business Impact and ROI” by Training Industry, show that learning leaders believe they are quite adept at measuring enrollments, completions, learner satisfaction and test scores. Yet, after all this time, learning organizations still struggle with determining job and business impact. Why, after 60 years of effort, are learning and development professionals still stuck? Why are people still struggling with measuring impact?

A recent survey by LEO Learning and Watershed, “The Pressure Continues to Rise: Measuring the Business Impact of Learning in 2019,” found that 96 percent of learning leaders want to measure impact, and 67 percent are feeling pressure to do so. The study asked leaders why they are not measuring the effects of learning, and results revealed that leaders struggle with competing priorities, not knowing how to start and not having access to data.

These reasons share a common root cause: a lack of confidence in the ability to measure impact. The traditional measurement framework does a good job of providing a structure, but it is time to expand the framework to enable L&D professionals to build confidence in their ability to measure impact. It is time to add a foundational element to the model: alignment.

Measure Impact
Measuring impact must begin with alignment.
The learning industry’s well-known four-level model of evaluation, introduced by Donald Kirkpatrick, celebrates its 60th anniversary this year, so it’s time to reflect on just how far the industry has come during that time. Industry reports, including 2016’s “The State of Learning Measurement” from Bersin by Deloitte and “Measure Up or Shut Down: The Importance of Measuring Business Impact and ROI” by Training Industry, show that learning leaders believe they are quite adept at measuring enrollments, completions, learner satisfaction and test scores. Yet, after all this time, learning organizations still struggle with determining job and business impact. Why, after 60 years of effort, are learning and development professionals still stuck? Why are people still struggling with measuring impact?

A recent survey by LEO Learning and Watershed, “The Pressure Continues to Rise: Measuring the Business Impact of Learning in 2019,” found that 96 percent of learning leaders want to measure impact, and 67 percent are feeling pressure to do so. The study asked leaders why they are not measuring the effects of learning, and results revealed that leaders struggle with competing priorities, not knowing how to start and not having access to data.

These reasons share a common root cause: a lack of confidence in the ability to measure impact. The traditional measurement framework does a good job of providing a structure, but it is time to expand the framework to enable L&D professionals to build confidence in their ability to measure impact. It is time to add a foundational element to the model: alignment.

5A Learning for the Digital Age
TCS’ 5A learning model — for anyone to learn anytime, anywhere, using any content on any device — strives to take learning where the learner is, transforming it from “push” to “pull.”
By Nivedita Kuruvilla AND Damodar Padhi
The dramatic impact of digital technologies is disrupting businesses and business models across industries. The “consumerization of IT” ushered in by the five digital forces — social, mobile, big data and analytics, cloud, and AI and robotics — has changed the way we work, interact and learn. What began as a technological change has swiftly transformed into a sociological change that has had an impact on almost all aspects of our lives and work. These digital technologies are revolutionizing the very nature of business processes of enterprises globally, leading them to adopt new business models.

Klaus Schwab, founder and executive chairman of the World Economic Forum, describes the technologies powering the Fourth Industrial Revolution as a range of new technologies that “combine the physical, digital and biological worlds. These new technologies will impact all disciplines, economies and industries, and even challenge our ideas about what it means to be human.” According to Deloitte, “The Fourth Industrial Revolution, or Industry 4.0, is about more than just advanced technologies: It is about the ways in which those technologies are brought together, and how organizations can harness them to drive operations and growth.”

5A Learning for the Digital Age
TCS’ 5A learning model — for anyone to learn anytime, anywhere, using any content on any device — strives to take learning where the learner is, transforming it from “push” to “pull.”
By Nivedita Kuruvilla AND Damodar Padhi
The dramatic impact of digital technologies is disrupting businesses and business models across industries. The “consumerization of IT” ushered in by the five digital forces — social, mobile, big data and analytics, cloud, and AI and robotics — has changed the way we work, interact and learn. What began as a technological change has swiftly transformed into a sociological change that has had an impact on almost all aspects of our lives and work. These digital technologies are revolutionizing the very nature of business processes of enterprises globally, leading them to adopt new business models.

Klaus Schwab, founder and executive chairman of the World Economic Forum, describes the technologies powering the Fourth Industrial Revolution as a range of new technologies that “combine the physical, digital and biological worlds. These new technologies will impact all disciplines, economies and industries, and even challenge our ideas about what it means to be human.” According to Deloitte, “The Fourth Industrial Revolution, or Industry 4.0, is about more than just advanced technologies: It is about the ways in which those technologies are brought together, and how organizations can harness them to drive operations and growth.”

5A Learning for the Digital Age
TCS’ 5A learning model — for anyone to learn anytime, anywhere, using any content on any device — strives to take learning where the learner is, transforming it from “push” to “pull.”
By Nivedita Kuruvilla AND Damodar Padhi
The dramatic impact of digital technologies is disrupting businesses and business models across industries. The “consumerization of IT” ushered in by the five digital forces — social, mobile, big data and analytics, cloud, and AI and robotics — has changed the way we work, interact and learn. What began as a technological change has swiftly transformed into a sociological change that has had an impact on almost all aspects of our lives and work. These digital technologies are revolutionizing the very nature of business processes of enterprises globally, leading them to adopt new business models.

Klaus Schwab, founder and executive chairman of the World Economic Forum, describes the technologies powering the Fourth Industrial Revolution as a range of new technologies that “combine the physical, digital and biological worlds. These new technologies will impact all disciplines, economies and industries, and even challenge our ideas about what it means to be human.” According to Deloitte, “The Fourth Industrial Revolution, or Industry 4.0, is about more than just advanced technologies: It is about the ways in which those technologies are brought together, and how organizations can harness them to drive operations and growth.”

D&I Done Right
When it comes to embracing diversity and inclusion in the workplace, addressing unconscious bias is only the first step.
By Elizabeth Loutfi
E

arlier this year, on the morning of June 5, Sephora closed all of its U.S. stores, distribution centers, call centers and its corporate office to host hourlong “inclusion workshops” for its employees. This was following backlash the makeup giant received after American R&B artist SZA tweeted about Sephora employees accusing her of stealing and calling security on her while she shopped at a California store. In May 2018, Starbucks shut down more than 8,000 U.S. locations so its 175,000 employees could complete a four-hour anti-bias training program, also following a racial profiling incident in a Philadelphia store.

Over the past few years, it’s been effectively proven that a diverse and inclusive workforce gives businesses a competitive edge and leads to higher profitability. Consequently, millennials and Generation Z rank D&I high among what they value in employers, according to Deloitte’s 2018 and 2019 “Global Millennial Survey” reports.

D&I Done Right
When it comes to embracing diversity and inclusion in the workplace, addressing unconscious bias is only the first step.
By Elizabeth Loutfi
E

arlier this year, on the morning of June 5, Sephora closed all of its U.S. stores, distribution centers, call centers and its corporate office to host hourlong “inclusion workshops” for its employees. This was following backlash the makeup giant received after American R&B artist SZA tweeted about Sephora employees accusing her of stealing and calling security on her while she shopped at a California store. In May 2018, Starbucks shut down more than 8,000 U.S. locations so its 175,000 employees could complete a four-hour anti-bias training program, also following a racial profiling incident in a Philadelphia store.

Over the past few years, it’s been effectively proven that a diverse and inclusive workforce gives businesses a competitive edge and leads to higher profitability. Consequently, millennials and Generation Z rank D&I high among what they value in employers, according to Deloitte’s 2018 and 2019 “Global Millennial Survey” reports.

Case Study


A Hands-On Approach
By Sarah Fister Gale
I

n the war for talent, experienced tradespeople are among the hardest candidates to find. As more high school students pursue four-year college degrees and apprenticeship programs become less common, teenagers have fewer avenues to launch a career in plumbing, HVAC and other trades. Fully 62 percent of organizations in these industries say they are struggling to fill key roles. At the same time, a large portion of the existing workforce is nearing retirement, with more than half now over the age of 45, according to data from staffing agency Adecco.

This growing talent crisis is forcing commercial operations and maintenance companies to rethink their talent development strategy or risk an inability to support future growth. “Today’s tight labor market combined with an aging skilled trade workforce means that we need to invest in building our team,” said Jim Lane, senior vice president of operations and maintenance for UG2, a privately held facility services organization based in Boston. And he’s got just the plan to do it.

Business Intelligence


Bright Budgetary Horizons
When it comes to learning budgets, the future looks bright.
By Ashley St. John
D

uring the past several years, learning leaders have maintained an overall optimistic outlook about the growth and funding of their organization’s learning function.

That optimism continues to grow, according to data from the Chief Learning Officer Business Intelligence Board’s “2019 Learning State of the Industry” report. A whopping 71 percent of those surveyed said their outlook for the next 12-18 months is more optimistic than last year (Figure 1). Twenty-two percent said they feel about the same, and 7 percent feel less optimistic.

The Chief Learning Officer Business Intelligence Board is a group of 1,500 professionals in the learning and development industry who have agreed to be surveyed by the Human Capital Media Research and Advisory Group, the research and advisory arm of Chief Learning Officer magazine. This survey was conducted from January to March 2019.

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In Conclusion


Leading With Grace to Fulfill Your Purpose
Purpose is the why, grace is the how By JOHN BALDONI
John Baldoni
John Baldoni is a globally recognized executive coach and leadership educator. He is the author of 14 books, including “Grace: A Leader’s Guide to a Better Us.”
P

urpose is what gives people, as well as organizations, the get-up-and-go they need to move ahead. Purpose is what sparks what you wish to become (your vision), as well as what you do (your mission). Achieving that mission takes drive, determination and no shortage of gumption.

You push ahead, and often pull people along for the ride. However, there is something that could make the pushing and pulling easier, more compatible and a lot more comfortable: values. Values are the core beliefs that we hold dear, and within an organization, they are the glue that binds us to one another.

Values determine the ways in which we connect. Values that reflect respect and dignity are those that emerge from grace. Grace, then, becomes our how, just as purpose is our why.

Thanks for reading our September 2019 issue!